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View Full Version : Did you know?: Walt Disney was a rabid anticommunist



CaughtintheMiddle1990
03-06-2011, 03:20 PM
I found this factoid of history rather interesting:

"Walt Disney was a founding member of the anti-communist Motion Picture Alliance for the Preservation of American Ideals. In 1947, during the early years of the Cold War,[74] Disney testified before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), where he branded Herbert Sorrell, David Hilberman and William Pomerance, former animators and labor union organizers, as Communist agitators. All three men denied the allegations. Sorrell testified before the HUAC in 1946 and there was insufficient evidence to link him to the Communist Party.[75][76]
Additionally, Disney accused the Screen Actors Guild of being a Communist front, and charged that the 1941 strike was part of an organized Communist effort to gain influence in Hollywood.[74]"

Rockntractor
03-06-2011, 03:29 PM
I knew it at one time but forgot about it 25 years ago.:D

Sonnabend
03-07-2011, 01:00 AM
Yeah, McCarthy....get railroaded or destroy your friends.....:rolleyes:

NJCardFan
03-07-2011, 01:47 AM
Yeah, McCarthy....get railroaded or destroy your friends.....:rolleyes:

UH, the HUAC was the HOUSE Un-American Activities Commitee. McCarthy was a Senator.

txradioguy
03-07-2011, 03:16 AM
Yeah, McCarthy....get railroaded or destroy your friends.....:rolleyes:

McCarthy got a raw deal. As history has proven he was right.

Nubs
03-07-2011, 07:28 AM
Yeah, McCarthy....get railroaded or destroy your friends.....:rolleyes:

Read up on the Venona Papers

Odysseus
03-07-2011, 09:51 AM
If you substitute communists for Nazis, this becomes a warm, fuzzy story. If you think about the similarities between communists and Nazis (totalitarianism, mass murder, erc.), then it's still a warm, fuzzy story.


I found this factoid of history rather interesting:

"Walt Disney was a founding member of the anti-Nazi Motion Picture Alliance for the Preservation of American Ideals. In 1941, during the early years of World War II,[74] Disney testified before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), where he branded Herbert Sorrell, David Hilberman and William Pomerance, former animators and labor union organizers, as Bundist agitators. All three men denied the allegations. Sorrell testified before the HUAC in 1946 and there was insufficient evidence to link him to the Nazi Party.[75][76]
Additionally, Disney accused the Screen Actors Guild of being a fascist front, and charged that the 1941 strike was part of an organized fascist effort to gain influence in Hollywood.[74]"

CaughtintheMiddle1990
03-07-2011, 12:05 PM
UH, the HUAC was the HOUSE Un-American Activities Commitee. McCarthy was a Senator.


Not only that, but Walt's testimony was in 1947. McCarthy didn't become a renowned anti-communist until 1950.

People blame McCarthy for the '50s Red Scare (and he was a bit overzealous and his methods were crude, and his accusing the army of hiding communists was disgraceful), but he didn't start the Red Scare. Truman did by starting the Cold War and Nixon made anti-communism an American virtue with the Alger Hiss case. We were already against Socialism (Wilson had refused to recognize the USSR because of it being a Bolshevist state) since the 1920s but in the 1950s it really heated up.

Odysseus
03-07-2011, 12:17 PM
Not only that, but Walt's testimony was in 1947. McCarthy didn't become a renowned anti-communist until 1950.

People blame McCarthy for the '50s Red Scare (and he was a bit overzealous and his methods were crude, and his accusing the army of hiding communists was disgraceful), but he didn't start the Red Scare. Truman did by starting the Cold War and Nixon made anti-communism an American virtue with the Alger Hiss case. We were already against Socialism (Wilson had refused to recognize the USSR because of it being a Bolshevist state) since the 1920s but in the 1950s it really heated up.

It helped that by the 1950s, the Soviets now had control of Eastern Europe and China had fallen to Mao and both were intent on expanding their spheres of control to, well, everywhere. When roughly half the population of the world was living in totalitarian misery, it became harder to ignore the facts.

txradioguy
03-07-2011, 12:19 PM
Truman did by starting the Cold War

How exactly did Truman start the Cold War? I seem to recall the Russians provoking things first.

It wasn't the Berlin Airlift that fueled things.




Nixon made anti-communism an American virtue with the Alger Hiss case.

So busting a Communist infiltrator within the State Department made anti-Communism a "virtue"?

How about the fact that Communism in and of itself is brutal and murderous to the people subjected to it and ruinous to any economy it touches?

Americanism is the anti-Communism and the best reason to fight it at every turn whether it's within our own borders or in places far away.

obx
03-07-2011, 12:58 PM
Another reason to love Walt Disney.

CaughtintheMiddle1990
03-07-2011, 01:35 PM
How exactly did Truman start the Cold War? I seem to recall the Russians provoking things first.

It wasn't the Berlin Airlift that fueled things.





So busting a Communist infiltrator within the State Department made anti-Communism a "virtue"?

How about the fact that Communism in and of itself is brutal and murderous to the people subjected to it and ruinous to any economy it touches?

Americanism is the anti-Communism and the best reason to fight it at every turn whether it's within our own borders or in places far away.

I wasn't criticizing them. I'm just saying, from an American perspective, Nixon helped fuel American sentiment against communism, and Truman took the first real hardline against communism from the position of the Presidency. Which was a good thing. You have to remember in the '20s and so there were a LOT of American communists--Eugene Debbs for example had a lot of followers.

I never said Communism wasn't brutal.....I'm an anti-communist myself.

Sonnabend
03-08-2011, 06:39 PM
McCarthyism is still an epithet and a foul name, no matter how much people try to whitewash what he did. Lives wrecked, the famous "black list".....funny how I see so many Americans so fond of McCarthy...and I ask if they are also fond of the First and Fourth amendments, or the Fifth, the right to the presumption of innocence...so what about it, CU

Is the Constitution really "the law of the land", or why is it that you seem to defend a man who took that same Constitution and used it for toilet paper? Can't have it both ways...either he violated the very basic civil rights of US citizens...or are those rights simply a matter of convenience?

You admire a man whose very existence and actions negate the spirit and letter of that very same law your Founders created.

So HUAC did good? Sure, if you call a repeat of the Salem hysteria and paranoia "good".

Not from where I sit. McCarthy and his "hearings" are an obscenity.

Now and always.


McCarthy got a raw deal. As history has proven he was right.

"Are you now or have you ever been...."


No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb (http://www.usconstitution.net/glossary.html#DOUBLEJ); nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived (http://www.usconstitution.net/glossary.html#DEPRIVE) of life, liberty, or property, without due process (http://www.usconstitution.net/consttop_duep.html) of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

"Are you now or have you ever been"....


The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Searches_and_seizures), shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

"Are you now or have you ever been"....


In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence

Either you live by those laws or you are a hypocrite.

Which is it?

txradioguy
03-08-2011, 11:29 PM
Either you live by those laws or you are a hypocrite.

Look Champ...oh never mind.

I could point out where you're tragically wrong on McCarthy but I don't want you whinging about it forever.

Odysseus
03-09-2011, 11:22 AM
McCarthyism is still an epithet and a foul name, no matter how much people try to whitewash what he did. Lives wrecked, the famous "black list".....funny how I see so many Americans so fond of McCarthy...and I ask if they are also fond of the First and Fourth amendments, or the Fifth, the right to the presumption of innocence...so what about it, CU

You're confusing McCarthy with HUAC, which was a house committee. The Hollywood 10 were interviewed by HUAC and took the fifth when asked if they were communists. Remember that at that time, the FBI knew that the CPUSA was being financed and run directly by the Soviet GRU. It was a criminal conspiracy to undermine the US. The blacklist wasn't imposed by the feds, either. Hollywood created it because the studio heads were mostly immigrants or descendants of immigrants who were deeply patriotic, and refused to have communists using their studios to subvert the nation.


Is the Constitution really "the law of the land", or why is it that you seem to defend a man who took that same Constitution and used it for toilet paper? Can't have it both ways...either he violated the very basic civil rights of US citizens...or are those rights simply a matter of convenience?

You admire a man whose very existence and actions negate the spirit and letter of that very same law your Founders created.

So HUAC did good? Sure, if you call a repeat of the Salem hysteria and paranoia "good".

Not from where I sit. McCarthy and his "hearings" are an obscenity.

Now and always.

"Are you now or have you ever been...."

"Are you now or have you ever been"....

"Are you now or have you ever been"....

Either you live by those laws or you are a hypocrite.

Which is it?

Or, we live by the laws and are not hypocrites, but decline to allow our country to be destroyed. Most of what you know about McCarthy has been filtered through leftist media and academics who were, if not outright communists, at least willing to be manipulated by those who were. First, you need to know the background. Ann Coulter has written as accurate a summary as you will find:


In the fall of 1949, three men brought to McCarthy's office a 100-page FBI report alleging extensive communist penetration of the State Department. The trio had asked three other senators to awaken the American people to this dangerous situation, but only McCarthy was willing to take on this volatile project.

Communist infiltration of the State Department began in the 1930s. On September 2, 1939, former communist Whittaker Chambers provided Assistant Secretary of State Adolph Berle with the names and communist connections of two dozen spies in the government, including Alger Hiss. Berle took the information to President Roosevelt, but FDR laughed it off and said that some of his friends were communists.

Hiss moved rapidly up the State Department ladder and served as an adviser to Roosevelt at the disastrous 1945 Yalta Conference that paved the way for the Soviet conquest of Central and Eastern Europe. Hiss also functioned as secretary-general of the founding meeting of the United Nations in San Francisco, helped to draft the UN Charter, and later filled dozens of positions at the UN with American communists before he was publicly exposed as a Soviet spy by Whittaker Chambers in 1948.
-------------------------------------------------------

McCARTHY HAD LIST OF STATE DEPARTMENT COMMUNISTS

On February 9, 1950, McCarthy made an electrifying speech at Wheeling, West VA, that he had a list of Communists in the State Department. By July he was a major political force. John F. Kennedy told Harvard students that "he knew Joe pretty well, and he may have something." In February 1952, John Kennedy called McCarthy a "great American patriot".

During McCarthy's entire 1947 to 1957 career, no American citizen was interrogated without benefit of legal counsel, none arrested or detained without due judicial process, and no one went to jail without trial.

Now, here's where most people got their view of McCarthy, the hearing at which Joseph Welch made his famous "Have you no decency?" screed. The background (http://www.knology.net/~bilrum/mccarth4.htm):


The Fred Fisher Episode. On June 9th, the 30th day of the hearings, Welch was engaged in baiting Roy Cohn, challenging him to get 130 communists or subversives out of defense plants "before the sun goes down." The treatment of Cohn angered McCarthy and he said that if Welch were so concerned about persons aiding the Communist Party, he should check on a man in his Boston law office named Fred Fisher, who had once belonged to the National Lawyers Guild (NLG), which Attorney General Brownell had called "the legal mouthpiece of the Communist Party." Welch then delivered the most famous lines from the Army-McCarthy Hearings, accusing McCarthy of "reckless cruelty" and concluding: "Let us not assassinate this lad further, senator. You've done enough. Have you no sense of decency, sir, at long last?"

The fact of the matter was that Fred Fisher's connection with the National Lawyers Guild had been widely publicized two months earlier. Page 12 of the April 16th New York Times had carried a picture of Fisher and a story about his removal from Welch's team because of his past association with the NLG. If Mr. Welch was so worried that McCarthy's remarks might inflict a lifelong "scar" on Fisher's reputation, why did he dramatize the incident in such histrionic fashion? The reason, of course, was that McCarthy had fallen into a trap in raising the Fisher issue, and Welch, superb showman that he was, played the scene for all it was worth. Was Fred Fisher hurt by the incident? Not at all. He became a partner in Welch's Boston law firm, Hale & Dorr, and was elected president of the Massachusetts Bar Association in the mid-1970s.

Odysseus
03-09-2011, 11:22 AM
So you have Welch, who had sarcastically demanded that McCarthy and Cohn publicize the names of any communists that they had and get them out of the government by sundown, now confronted with the fact that not only did he know of a communist who had been recommended to the government for work on a sensitive committee, but that he was the one who had put him forward. Welch's response was to lie and scream. Keep that in mind when you read the transcript:


Senator McCarthy:
Mr. Chairman, in view of that request by Mr. --

Senator Mundt:
Point of Order?

Senator McCarthy:
Not exactly, Mr. Chairman. But in view of Mr. Welch's request that the information be given once we know of anyone who might be performing any work for the Communist Party, I think we should tell him that he has in his law firm a young man named Fisher whom he recommended, incidentally, to do the work on this Committee, who has been, for a number of years, a member of an organization which is named, oh, years and years ago, as the legal bulwark of the Communist Party, an organization which always springs to the defense of anyone who dares to expose Communists.

Knowing that, Mr. Welch, I just felt that I had a duty to respond to your urgent request that "before sundown," when we know of anyone serving the Communist cause we let the agency know. Now, we're now letting you know that your man did belong to this organization for either three or four years, belonged to it long after he was out of law school. And I have hesitated bringing that up, but I have been rather bored with your phony requests to Mr. Cohn here, that he, personally, get every Communist out of Government before sundown. Whether you knew that he was a member of that Communist organization or not, I don't know. I assume you did not, Mr. Welch, because I get the impression that while you are quite an actor, you play for a laugh, I don't think you have any conception of the danger of the Communist Party. I don't think you, yourself, would ever knowingly aid the Communist cause. I think you're unknowingly aiding it when you try to burlesque this hearing in which we're attempting to bring out the facts.

Mr. Welch:
Mr. Chairman....

Senator Mundt:
The Chair may say that he has no recognition or no memory of Mr. Welch recommending either Mr. Fisher or anybody else as counsel for this Committee.

Senator McCarthy:
I refer to the record, Mr. Chairman...to the news story on that.

Mr. Welch:
Mr. Chairman. Under these circumstances, I must myself have something approaching a personal privilege.

Senator Mundt:
You may have, sir --

Mr. Welch:
Senator McCarthy, I did not know, Senator -- Senator, sometimes you say may I have your attention --

Senator McCarthy:
I'm listening....

Mr. Welch:
May I have your attention?

Senator McCarthy:
I can listen with one ear and talk with --

Mr. Welch:
No, this time, sir, I want you to listen with both. Senator McCarthy, I think until this moment --

Senator McCarthy:
-- Good. Just a minute. Jim, Jim, will you get the news story to the effect that this man belongs to the -- to this Communist front organization....

Mr. Welch:
I will tell you that he belonged to it.

Senator McCarthy:
Jim, will you get the citation, one of the citations showing that this was the legal arm of the Communist Party, and the length of time that he belonged, and the fact that he was recommended by Mr. Welch. I think that should be in the record....

Mr. Welch:
Senator, you won't need anything in the record when I finish telling you this. Until this moment, Senator, I think I never really gauged your cruelty, or your recklessness. Fred Fisher is a young man who went to the Harvard Law School and came into my firm and is starting what looks to be a brilliant career with us. When I decided to work for this Committee, I asked Jim St. Clair, who sits on my right, to be my first assistant. I said to Jim, "Pick somebody in the firm to work under you that you would like." He chose Fred Fisher, and they came down on an afternoon plane. That night, when we had taken a little stab at trying to see what the case is about, Fred Fisher and Jim St. Clair and I went to dinner together. I then said to these two young men, "Boys, I don't know anything about you, except I've always liked you, but if there's anything funny in the life of either one of you that would hurt anybody in this case, you speak up quick."

And Fred Fisher said, "Mr. Welch, when I was in the law school, and for a period of months after, I belonged to the Lawyers' Guild," as you have suggested, Senator. He went on to say, "I am Secretary of the Young Republican's League in Newton with the son of [the] Massachusetts governor, and I have the respect and admiration of my community, and I'm sure I have the respect and admiration of the twenty-five lawyers or so in Hale & Dorr." And I said, "Fred, I just don't think I'm going to ask you to work on the case. If I do, one of these days that will come out, and go over national television, and it will just hurt like the dickens." And so, Senator, I asked him to go back to Boston. Little did I dream you could be so reckless and so cruel as to do an injury to that lad. It is, I regret to say, equally true that I fear he shall always bear a scar needlessly inflicted by you. If it were in my power to forgive you for your reckless cruelty, I would do so. I like to think I'm a gentle man, but your forgiveness will have to come from someone other than me.

Senator McCarthy:
Mr. Chairman, may I say that Mr. Welch talks about this being cruel and reckless. He was just baiting. He has been baiting Mr. Cohn here for hours, requesting that Mr. Cohn before sundown get out of any department of the government anyone who is serving the Communist cause. Now, I just give this man's record and I want to say, Mr. Welch, that it had been labeled long before he became a member, as early as 1944 --

Mr. Welch:
Senator, may we not drop this? We know he belonged to the Lawyers' Guild.

Senator McCarthy:
Let me finish....

Mr. Welch:
And Mr. Cohn nods his head at me. I did you, I think, no personal injury, Mr. Cohn?

Mr. Cohn:
No, sir.

Mr. Welch:
I meant to do you no personal injury.

Mr. Cohn:
No, sir.

Mr. Welch:
And if I did, I beg your pardon. Let us not assassinate this lad further, Senator.

Senator McCarthy:
Let's, let's --

Mr. Welch:
You've done enough. Have you no sense of decency, sir, at long last? Have you left no sense of decency?

Senator McCarthy:
I know this hurts you, Mr. Welch.

Mr. Welch:
I'll say it hurts!

Senator McCarthy:
Mr. Chairman, as point of personal privilege, I'd like to finish this.

Mr. Welch:
Senator, I think it hurts you, too, sir.

Senator McCarthy:
I'd like to finish this. I know Mr. Cohn would rather not have me go into this. I intend to, however, and Mr. Welch talks about any "sense of decency." I have heard you and everyone else talk so much about laying the truth upon the table. But when I heard the completely phony Mr. Welch, I've been listening now for a long time, he's saying, now "before sundown" you must get these people "out of government." So I just want you to have it very clear, very clear that you were not so serious about that when you tried to recommend this man for this Committee.

Mr. Welch:
Mr. McCarthy, I will not discuss this further with you. You have sat within six feet of me and could ask -- could have asked me about Fred Fisher. You have seen fit to bring it out, and if there is a God in heaven, it will do neither you nor your cause any good. I will not discuss it further. I will not ask, Mr. Cohn, any more witnesses. You, Mr. Chairman, may, if you will, call the next witness.

You now know more than most people about Joe McCarthy and the history of Welch's tirade.