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Gingersnap
03-11-2011, 12:01 PM
Illinois Governor Signs Amazon Internet Sales Tax Law
Mar. 10 2011 - 6:33 pm | 71,701 views | 0 recommendations | 9 comments
By JANET NOVACK

After two-months of fence-sitting, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn today signed controversial legislation requiring Internet retailers like Amazon.com and Overstock.com to collect Illinois’ 6.25% sales tax if they have affiliate sellers in the state. House Bill 3659, the Mainstreet Fairness Bill, was passed by the state’s lame duck legislature in early January. Since then, the bill has been the subject of fierce lobbying by traditional bricks and mortar retailers, who supported it, and Illinois-based Internet-only businesses, who warned that if Quinn didn’t veto it some of them would flee the state. Had Quinn done nothing, the bill would have become law tomorrow without his signature.

Amazon has already said it will terminate its Illinois affiliates, just as it has said it will drop 10,000 California based “associates” if similar legislation pending in that state becomes law. Affiliates are paid a fee by Amazon and other retailers for sales brought in through advertisements and links on the affiliates’ web sites. In an escalating PR war, Wal-Mart, Sears, Best Buy and Barnes & Noble have all issued public invitations to Amazon’s spurned associates to join their affiliate marketing programs instead. Yesterday, the Alliance for Main Street Fairness, a bricks and mortar retailers organization, even announced a new web site to connect affiliates “about to get thrown under the bus” by online-only sellers with retailers who already collect sales taxes on line. Quinn’s office said today that the affiliate matchmaking service had been launched at his request.

In a statement, Scott Kluth, founder and CEO of Chicago-based CouponCabin.com called the Governor’s approval of the bill “deeply disappointing” and said he is “actively exploring” moving his seven year-old business to Indiana. Kluth, a long time resident of Chicago, had previously threatened such a move, telling Forbes, “I can see Indiana form the roof of our business.”

But Quinn, a Democrat, described the law as necessary to put the state’s “main street businesses” on “a level playing field” with online retailers and to protect main street jobs. In a statement issued by Quinn’s office, David Vite, president of the Illinois Retail Merchants Association praised the law as a matter of “fairness for retailers, fairness for the economy but most importantly, fairness for taxpayers.”

Forbes (http://blogs.forbes.com/janetnovack/2011/03/10/illinois-governor-signs-amazon-internet-sales-tax-law/)

megimoo
03-11-2011, 12:06 PM
Forbes (http://blogs.forbes.com/janetnovack/2011/03/10/illinois-governor-signs-amazon-internet-sales-tax-law/)This will end up costing them more than they would gain in taxes,typical mindless Liberal Democrat grab the money tax .

Gingersnap
03-11-2011, 03:39 PM
This will end up costing them more than they would gain in taxes,typical mindless Liberal Democrat grab the money tax .

I expect it will in the long run.

fettpett
03-11-2011, 03:45 PM
Some states collect sales taxes on items bought online. Here in Michigan you're suppose to report said purchase when you do your taxes....How many people do? only the idiots that don't know better.


Typical libtard Dem, lets raise taxes on everyone then put a tax on internet sales

malloc
03-11-2011, 03:46 PM
But Quinn, a Democrat, described the law as necessary to put the state’s “main street businesses” on “a level playing field” with online retailers and to protect main street jobs. In a statement issued by Quinn’s office, David Vite, president of the Illinois Retail Merchants Association praised the law as a matter of “fairness for retailers, fairness for the economy but most importantly, fairness for taxpayers.”

The ignorance of this statement is just confounding. Those "main street business[es]" are already on a level playing field with online retailers as there is nothing barring those business from retailing online. This is simple intrastate protectionism, the type of behavior the commerce clause was specifically designed to curtail.

Madisonian
03-11-2011, 04:02 PM
Some states collect sales taxes on items bought online. Here in Michigan you're suppose to report said purchase when you do your taxes....How many people do? only the idiots that don't know better.


Typical libtard Dem, lets raise taxes on everyone then put a tax on internet sales

Biggest con is when you buy something off Ebay and it states "xxx residents must pay x% sales tax."
Yeah, right. They report it.:D

Next time, ask them for their state sales tax ID number. Seems they aren't in such a big hurry to collect it at that point.

fettpett
03-11-2011, 05:44 PM
Biggest con is when you buy something off Ebay and it states "xxx residents must pay x% sales tax."
Yeah, right. They report it.:D

Next time, ask them for their state sales tax ID number. Seems they aren't in such a big hurry to collect it at that point.

lol...I didn't bother to tell them I had bought anything...it was around $1,500 in computer part, fuck them if they think i'm going to pay on that

PoliCon
03-11-2011, 08:08 PM
I buy things off Amazon specifically to avoid the sales tax!

Arroyo_Doble
03-11-2011, 08:15 PM
Fuck Amazon.

I am glad Texas sent them a bill. Like those fucking roads you guys are driving on? That police protection? An educated work force? Water? Sewage? Solid waste disposal?

Pay the fuck up and stop leeching off the rest of us.

PoliCon
03-11-2011, 08:47 PM
Fuck Amazon.

I am glad Texas sent them a bill. Like those fucking roads you guys are driving on? That police protection? An educated work force? Water? Sewage? Solid waste disposal?

Pay the fuck up and stop leeching off the rest of us.

In the grand tradition of the founding fathers - I'm gonna avoid excessive taxes at every chance.

Arroyo_Doble
03-11-2011, 08:50 PM
In the grand tradition of the founding fathers - I'm gonna avoid excessive taxes at every chance.

Yea. The Brits rid us of the damn French and when the bill came due, we blanche.

Rockntractor
03-11-2011, 08:55 PM
Pay the fuck up and stop leeching off the rest of us.

You are calling the Illinois Governor the "fuck up"?

Arroyo_Doble
03-11-2011, 08:57 PM
You are calling the Illinois Governor the "fuck up"?

Possibly. Why not?

Rockntractor
03-11-2011, 09:01 PM
Possibly. Why not?

Works for me.:D

PoliCon
03-11-2011, 09:09 PM
Yea. The Brits rid us of the damn French and when the bill came due, we blanche.

Need I remind you that defense of it's colonies was one of the duties of the mother country - nor that we had no problem paying back the money? The problem was excessive taxation and taxation without representation.

Arroyo_Doble
03-11-2011, 09:12 PM
Need I remind you that defense of it's colonies was one of the duties of the mother country - nor that we had no problem paying back the money? The problem was excessive taxation and taxation without representation.

I was being glib.

Gingersnap
03-12-2011, 12:01 AM
Aside from the wear and tear on infrastructure (roads, runways, etc.), how does online buying impact local communities?

If it was possible for me to find what I wanted locally, I'd buy it. Local businesses have to cater to the majority consumer and I'm not in that category aside from food, hardware, discount miscellany, and animal feed and services.

There isn't going to be a local business that caters to my taste in Gothic fiction, raw silk fabric, handspun yarns, exotic Hostas, and loose tea. And there never was. Americans have been ordering from catalogs for well over 100 years. We've never been able to get all our consumer needs met locally. The only difference is that now city people are using the type of methods country people have relied on for decades.

And suddenly, it's an issue.

fettpett
03-12-2011, 08:57 AM
Aside from the wear and tear on infrastructure (roads, runways, etc.), how does online buying impact local communities?

If it was possible for me to find what I wanted locally, I'd buy it. Local businesses have to cater to the majority consumer and I'm not in that category aside from food, hardware, discount miscellany, and animal feed and services.

There isn't going to be a local business that caters to my taste in Gothic fiction, raw silk fabric, handspun yarns, exotic Hostas, and loose tea. And there never was. Americans have been ordering from catalogs for well over 100 years. We've never been able to get all our consumer needs met locally. The only difference is that now city people are using the type of methods country people have relied on for decades.

And suddenly, it's an issue.

125 years :D

like said above it's nothing more than protectionism and it's bullshit. It's just another way that IL Dems are fucking over their constituents. This whole this is sad considering Chicago was the center of Mail-Order catalogs

RobJohnson
03-16-2011, 01:05 AM
Aside from the wear and tear on infrastructure (roads, runways, etc.), how does online buying impact local communities?

If it was possible for me to find what I wanted locally, I'd buy it. Local businesses have to cater to the majority consumer and I'm not in that category aside from food, hardware, discount miscellany, and animal feed and services.

There isn't going to be a local business that caters to my taste in Gothic fiction, raw silk fabric, handspun yarns, exotic Hostas, and loose tea. And there never was. Americans have been ordering from catalogs for well over 100 years. We've never been able to get all our consumer needs met locally. The only difference is that now city people are using the type of methods country people have relied on for decades.

And suddenly, it's an issue.

Some of us live in an area where shopping choices are very limited without spending fifty bucks on gas...I shop online quite often. It's also nice to be able to make a purchase online and have it sent to someone else as a gift without leaving my chair.

In fact, I actually spend more money due to online shopping being so easy....I guess I am killing the economy??? :p

Ginger makes a good point. I remember catalogs that only required sales tax if you lived in certain states... It's funny how soon people forget...

lacarnut
03-16-2011, 01:46 AM
I worked as a sales tax auditor for the LA Dept of Revenue. States have been trying to collect sales taxes on interstate commerce sales for many years. The Supreme Court has stated over and over if the sale involves interstate (not intrastate) commerce then no sales tax is due. Therefore, if Amazon ships merchandise out of the state of IL, the state is not due the tax unless title or possession takes place in IL.

If Amazon is located in IL and shipped merchandise to CA who has nexus (a location, a salesman, warehouse, etc), Amazon would collect CA sales tax not IL and report it to the state of CA.

Amazon is going to get whacked by Texas because a warehouse does give them nexus there.