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Arroyo_Doble
03-13-2011, 12:59 AM
Why aren't we hearing about looting in Japan?

djones520
03-13-2011, 01:02 AM
Some possible reasons.

One, there is some happening, but we just aren't getting the full story.

Two, it's just not happening because they aren't as materialistic as we are.

Three, the devestation was so wide spread, there just wasn't any thing left to loot.

lacarnut
03-13-2011, 01:03 AM
Why aren't we hearing about looting in Japan?

Don't you have a direct pipeline to Obama? I am sure he could answer your question.

RobJohnson
03-13-2011, 01:03 AM
I've found it odd that you have not blamed Bush yet.

Rockntractor
03-13-2011, 01:03 AM
Honor.

djones520
03-13-2011, 01:04 AM
Honor.

That is my belief.

Now I love being American and everything, but my 7+ years in Japan has taught me that in many aspects their culture is superior to ours.

Apocalypse
03-13-2011, 01:11 AM
Why aren't we hearing about looting in Japan?

No Liberals that have a "Give Me" mentality?

megimoo
03-13-2011, 01:12 AM
That is my belief.

Now I love being American and everything, but my 7+ years in Japan has taught me that in many aspects their culture is superior to ours.Very much so,If you drop your wallet on the street they would chase after you to return it.When I was there even if you were at a party and your wallet was left on the table while you danced with a girl no one would even consider taking it,Their concept of honor is far superior to ours.

djones520
03-13-2011, 01:13 AM
Very much so,If you drop your wallet on the street they would chase after you to return it.When I was there even if you were at a party and your wallet was left on the table while you danced with a girl no one would even consider taking it,Their concept of honor is far superior to ours.

It was a frequent thing to see a Japanese person pull up to a store, step out of their car leaving it running, go in for 15 minutes, and come out, without a second thought.

I'd love to see somewhere in America I could do that.

Novaheart
03-13-2011, 01:21 AM
It was a frequent thing to see a Japanese person pull up to a store, step out of their car leaving it running, go in for 15 minutes, and come out, without a second thought.

I'd love to see somewhere in America I could do that.

People do it here. It's illegal, but they do it in the summer. Cops do it. In Fairfax VA people go out in their pj's on icy mornings and start the car, leave it running for 45 minutes while they go back inside, and then leave foe work. It's horribly wasteful.

megimoo
03-13-2011, 01:27 AM
It was a frequent thing to see a Japanese person pull up to a store, step out of their car leaving it running, go in for 15 minutes, and come out, without a second thought.

I'd love to see somewhere in America I could do that.

Japanese law is very strict .A thief is immediately dumped into some dungeon and stays there until someone finally decides to take him before a judge and lock him up for good.

Japanese prisons are brutal .A prisoner isn't allowed to talk or even look at another prisoner.If a prisoner breaks a rule the guards never hesitate to beat him with bamboo bats .A thief dishonors his entire family and brings great shame on their family name.

djones520
03-13-2011, 01:29 AM
Japanese law is very strict .A thief is immediately dumped into some dungeon and stays there until someone finally decides to take him before a judge and lock him up for good.

Japanese prisons are brutal .A prisoner isn't allowed to talk or even look at another prisoner.If a prisoner breaks a rule the guards never hesitate to beat him with bamboo bats .A thief dishonors his entire family and brings great shame on their family name.

Oh I know how bad they are. An acquantance of my family (he was America) tried to kill his Japanese mother in law. He ended up in a pretty nasty pit.

NJCardFan
03-13-2011, 02:42 AM
I'm assuming this honor thing doesn't go for Yakuza?

djones520
03-13-2011, 02:46 AM
I'm assuming this honor thing doesn't go for Yakuza?

Even to an extent it goes for them as well.

Constitutionally Speaking
03-13-2011, 08:36 AM
Why aren't we hearing about looting in Japan?

Because their society does not condone stealing from others simply because they have more than you do. They have not undermined the moral code to nearly the degree we have here, in the U.S.

In the U.S. we have one political party whose ENTIRE reason for existing is to promote theft and envy.

Calypso Jones
03-13-2011, 09:28 AM
no roads.

Calypso Jones
03-13-2011, 10:10 AM
minimal crime in Japan? Maybe you just don't hear about it.

http://www.nationmaster.com/country/ja-japan/cri-crime

Calypso Jones
03-13-2011, 10:33 AM
onthe other hand...just watching video of Japanese in line for water and food. No rioting, no fights, orderly. Now what would you attribute that to? Ethnicity? ;)

Bailey
03-13-2011, 10:38 AM
onthe other hand...just watching video of Japanese in line for water and food. No rioting, no fights, orderly. Now what would you attribute that to? Ethnicity? ;)

For the love of pete its just a comparison between Savages and Non-savages or From the evolved and the Non evolved. Look at any part of a city or country and you tell me if its kept up or not.

NJCardFan
03-13-2011, 11:47 AM
For the love of pete its just a comparison between Savages and Non-savages or From the evolved and the Non evolved. Look at any part of a city or country and you tell me if its kept up or not.

To be fair, Japan, like any other nation, has it's share of knuckleheads, however, being that traditionally they are a much more reserved people(in my experience, Japanese people are the most respectful people I've ever met) and in a case like this, it's better to keep a cool head. Also, they've been through this kind of thing before and no how to handle it and have contingencies for this.

megimoo
03-13-2011, 12:04 PM
For the love of pete its just a comparison between Savages and Non-savages or From the evolved and the Non evolved. Look at any part of a city or country and you tell me if its kept up or not.

You misunderstand the cultural differences.Japan isn't America by any stretch of the imagination .The Japanese have been bred to obey the law and taught from birth to obey family first and then honor authority .Their past social life revolved around worship of their god emperor .

After they were defeated and occupied the emperor,under pressure from MacArthur,
proclaimed that he was a mere mortal not a god. Many of the older Japanese people were never able to adjust to life without a godhead .

Japan smells and looks different than America .For years they had open sewerage in ditches flowing along beside their streets .The Japanese in the past used 'night soil' to fertilize their farmland .They have a very strong social code of honoring and obeying their superiors .the Japanese are scrupulous clean and bathing rituals are observed even in the smallest village with community bathhouses.

Apache
03-13-2011, 03:39 PM
Why aren't we hearing about looting in Japan?

The vast scope of destruction for one. Continuing dangers, after shocks, fires, water, power plants and now a freakin' volcano, second. Finally, and this is the biggest one....IT AIN'T L.A. :rolleyes:

RobJohnson
03-13-2011, 04:35 PM
It was a frequent thing to see a Japanese person pull up to a store, step out of their car leaving it running, go in for 15 minutes, and come out, without a second thought.

I'd love to see somewhere in America I could do that.

I do it all the time. Of course most of the time I lock the doors.

Starbuck
03-13-2011, 07:48 PM
I do it all the time. Of course most of the time I lock the doors.

And it's done routinely in places like Minnesota during the winter out in the boondocks. Naively, I asked whether my friend was not afraid someone would steal his car. He looked around at the frozen prairie, then back at me, aghast. "Where the hell would he come from?", he said.

NJCardFan
03-13-2011, 09:10 PM
I do it all the time. Of course most of the time I lock the doors.

When I was growing up, we never locked the doors.

PoliCon
03-13-2011, 10:55 PM
Honor.

EXACTLY. Their culture does not allow for it.

RobJohnson
03-13-2011, 11:12 PM
And it's done routinely in places like Minnesota during the winter out in the boondocks. Naively, I asked whether my friend was not afraid someone would steal his car. He looked around at the frozen prairie, then back at me, aghast. "Where the hell would he come from?", he said.

Did it in the Midwest all the time...with the doors unlocked. Now I would not try this in Las Vegas, but I do it here often enough....

During the cold winters I remember a popular watering hole, everyone went outside to warm up their cars before leaving..no one stole anyone's car..

Odysseus
03-13-2011, 11:28 PM
EXACTLY. Their culture does not allow for it.

Yep. An interesting paper on the subject was done a few years ago:


Cultures of Corruption: Evidence from Diplomatic Parking Tickets*

Ray Fisman
Edward Miguel
Columbia University and NBER University of California, Berkeley and NBER

First version: March 2006
This version: April 2006

Abstract: Corruption is believed to be a major factor impeding economic development, but the
importance of legal enforcement versus cultural norms in controlling corruption is poorly
understood. To disentangle these two factors, we exploit a natural experiment, the stationing of
thousands of diplomats from around the world in New York City. Diplomatic immunity means
there was essentially zero legal enforcement of diplomatic parking violations, allowing us to
examine the role of cultural norms alone. This generates a revealed preference measure of
corruption based on real-world behavior for government officials all acting in the same setting.
We find tremendous persistence in corruption norms: diplomats from high corruption countries
(based on existing survey-based indices) have significantly more parking violations. In a second
main result, officials from countries that survey evidence indicates have less favorable popular
views of the United States commit significantly more parking violations, providing nonlaboratory
evidence on the role that sentiment and affinity play in economic decision-making.

The countries were ranked in accordance with corruption as correlated by violations per diplomat, from 1-146. Kuwait was the worst offender at number 1, with 246.2 violations per diplomat, with 9 diplomats in the section. Japan placed near the bottom, at 140 out of 146, with 0 violations per diplomat, with 47 diplomats assigned. Out of all of the countries with 0 violations, Japan had the largest number of diplomats.

The study can be found here (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CBQQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usc.edu%2Fschools%2Fbusiness% 2FFBE%2Fseminars%2Fpapers%2FAE_4-28-06_FISMAN-parking.pdf&ei=WJd9Tc_dAejB0QH-tvzzAw&usg=AFQjCNGshNpwk91-XEXk5pxUZQrspcsw7g).

Rockntractor
03-13-2011, 11:43 PM
Yep. An interesting paper on the subject was done a few years ago:


Cultures of Corruption: Evidence from Diplomatic Parking Tickets*

Ray Fisman
Edward Miguel
Columbia University and NBER University of California, Berkeley and NBER

First version: March 2006
This version: April 2006

Abstract: Corruption is believed to be a major factor impeding economic development, but the
importance of legal enforcement versus cultural norms in controlling corruption is poorly
understood. To disentangle these two factors, we exploit a natural experiment, the stationing of
thousands of diplomats from around the world in New York City. Diplomatic immunity means
there was essentially zero legal enforcement of diplomatic parking violations, allowing us to
examine the role of cultural norms alone. This generates a revealed preference measure of
corruption based on real-world behavior for government officials all acting in the same setting.
We find tremendous persistence in corruption norms: diplomats from high corruption countries
(based on existing survey-based indices) have significantly more parking violations. In a second
main result, officials from countries that survey evidence indicates have less favorable popular
views of the United States commit significantly more parking violations, providing nonlaboratory
evidence on the role that sentiment and affinity play in economic decision-making.

The countries were ranked in accordance with corruption as correlated by violations per diplomat, from 1-146. Kuwait was the worst offender at number 1, with 246.2 violations per diplomat, with 9 diplomats in the section. Japan placed near the bottom, at 140 out of 146, with 0 violations per diplomat, with 47 diplomats assigned. Out of all of the countries with 0 violations, Japan had the largest number of diplomats.

The study can be found here (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CBQQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usc.edu%2Fschools%2Fbusiness% 2FFBE%2Fseminars%2Fpapers%2FAE_4-28-06_FISMAN-parking.pdf&ei=WJd9Tc_dAejB0QH-tvzzAw&usg=AFQjCNGshNpwk91-XEXk5pxUZQrspcsw7g).

It would appear the muzzies are the worst offenders.

fettpett
03-13-2011, 11:49 PM
I rarely lock my doors...even my house door when we leave

Odysseus
03-14-2011, 12:45 AM
It would appear the muzzies are the worst offenders.
Pretty much, although Turkey scored surprisingly high on the trust scale.

I rarely lock my doors...even my house door when we leave

And what's your address again...? :D

RobJohnson
03-14-2011, 01:07 AM
When I was growing up, we never locked the doors.

I do now that I live in a more rural area. When I lived in the middle of town in a gated community, I never locked my doors.

fettpett
03-14-2011, 08:11 AM
Pretty much, although Turkey scored surprisingly high on the trust scale.


And what's your address again...? :D

somewhere in Michigan?

Adam Wood
03-14-2011, 09:01 AM
Nobody went looting in lower Manhattan after 9/11, either.

ralph wiggum
03-14-2011, 09:04 AM
I don't know, maybe there are no Democrats in Japan?

fettpett
03-14-2011, 09:15 AM
I don't know, maybe there are no Democrats in Japan?

but they do have liberal/socialist

Odysseus
03-14-2011, 10:17 AM
somewhere in Michigan?
No, I meant a house and street address, and a time when you wouldn't be home. You wouldn't happen to have a big screen TV, would you? :D

Nobody went looting in lower Manhattan after 9/11, either.
But if it had happened in the Bronx...

but they do have liberal/socialist

Not enough to corrupt the social order, apparently.

Adam Wood
03-14-2011, 10:27 AM
But if it had happened in the Bronx...Well, there's a lot of the East Village that ain't much better than the Bronx.

My point was actually more about the trauma that causes the chaos in the first place. I think that there is an inverse correlation between things like looting and events like this. The larger, faster, stronger, and more immediately devastating some event is, the less looting there is. People didn't go loot TVs out of lower Manhattan electronics stores after 9/11 because the whole shock was just so much, so quickly. I think that much of the same applies to Japan in this situation: this earthquake was so much destruction and loss of life so quickly that I think people there are just too much in shock to go out and loot. Contrast that with, say, Katrina, and the long, slow damage that was caused, and people were out looting in no time.

fettpett
03-14-2011, 11:24 AM
No, I meant a house and street address, and a time when you wouldn't be home. You wouldn't happen to have a big screen TV, would you? :D

nope, no big screen.

Odysseus
03-14-2011, 11:59 AM
Well, there's a lot of the East Village that ain't much better than the Bronx.

My point was actually more about the trauma that causes the chaos in the first place. I think that there is an inverse correlation between things like looting and events like this. The larger, faster, stronger, and more immediately devastating some event is, the less looting there is. People didn't go loot TVs out of lower Manhattan electronics stores after 9/11 because the whole shock was just so much, so quickly. I think that much of the same applies to Japan in this situation: this earthquake was so much destruction and loss of life so quickly that I think people there are just too much in shock to go out and loot. Contrast that with, say, Katrina, and the long, slow damage that was caused, and people were out looting in no time.
That's part of it, but a lot of it depends on the local culture. The East Village was not as bad as it used to be (remember that 9/11 came after almost eight years of Giuliani's police reforms) and the various squatters were in the minority. Also, the majority wouldn't have tolerated it and Rudy would not, either. Japan has its criminals and bums, but they aren't treated like anything but criminals and bums. The vast majority of people abide by the social codes that are the underpinning of the legal codes. Without that, you can have all of the laws on the books that you want, but you'll still have public anarchy.

An example of this is the Westboro Baptist Church case. I cannot imagine the founders envisioning a situation where a hate group would disrupt funerals for publicity and use the Constitution for protection. The thought of such conduct would have shocked and appalled Madison, and he would not have believed such depravity possible. We cannot legislate basic human decency and consideration, but we can over-legislate against it and undermine it until it vanishes.

nope, no big screen.

Never-mind, then. :D

ABC in Georgia
03-14-2011, 01:09 PM
No Liberals that have a "Give Me" mentality?

http://i1117.photobucket.com/albums/k592/ABC160/Imaginenoliberals.jpg

Especially here in the USA! :eek:

~ ABC

Oops! Gotta get off this machine ... hubby just came home from golf. Rats!

rjas77
03-15-2011, 03:26 PM
...or people pissing and moaning that the government isn't doing enough to help them in Japan?

Now compare that to Katrina...

Bailey
03-15-2011, 04:38 PM
Its all about the culture, one is a self reliant one and the other cant do anything for itself besides hip hop and pimping ho's.

CaughtintheMiddle1990
03-15-2011, 04:44 PM
From what I've read of Japan and other Eastern cultures, they hold honor in very high regard; They'd rather starve to death with honor than live by dishonoring themselves through theft.

Novaheart
03-15-2011, 04:45 PM
...or people pissing and moaning that the government isn't doing enough to help them in Japan?

Now compare that to Katrina...

I've been thinking about this, and my guess would be that this has a lot to do with the concept of Other.

With some notable exceptions, looting tends to be people trashing and grabbing stuff which belongs to other people. When those other people are a different socio-economic group, then you have the perception of Other.

I'm thinking that in Japan you probably don't have as much Other. I have never been there, so if I am wrong I'm guessing that someone who has lived there for real would correct me.

fettpett
03-15-2011, 06:07 PM
do we really need another thread on this topic?

rjas77
03-15-2011, 06:24 PM
do we really need another thread on this topic?

Didn't know there was another one :confused:

ETA Nevermind..I see the first one

rjas77
03-15-2011, 06:32 PM
Nobody went looting in lower Manhattan after 9/11, either.

What would you think would happen in a place say...Like the Bronx, LA, Detroit, Baltimore or any other city so "ethnically diverse"?

Rockntractor
03-15-2011, 06:45 PM
do we really need another thread on this topic?

feexed.

Adam Wood
03-15-2011, 07:15 PM
What would you think would happen in a place say...Like the Bronx, LA, Detroit, Baltimore or any other city so "ethnically diverse"?Covered back upthread before this got merged. I don't deny that the location and, for lack of a better description, the quality of people in that area would have a definite effect on the reaction of the locals. I just think that sometimes the trauma of certain events are so great that people are basically just too shocked to do stuff like go out and loot. Shock and awe, if you will.

Odysseus
03-16-2011, 12:01 AM
I've been thinking about this, and my guess would be that this has a lot to do with the concept of Other.

With some notable exceptions, looting tends to be people trashing and grabbing stuff which belongs to other people. When those other people are a different socio-economic group, then you have the perception of Other.

I'm thinking that in Japan you probably don't have as much Other. I have never been there, so if I am wrong I'm guessing that someone who has lived there for real would correct me.

It's not the absence of other ethnicities. The Japanese have an extremely ordered society. American Thinker ran an article today on the subject that explains a lot of it.


March 15, 2011
Why The Japanese Aren't Looting

By Thomas Lifson
Foreign observers are noting with curiosity and wonder that the Japanese people in disaster-plagued areas are not looting for desperately-needed supplies like bottled water. This behavior contrasts sharply with what has so often happened in the wake of catastrophes elsewhere, such as Haiti, New Orleans, Chile, and the UK, to name only a few. Most people chalk up the extraordinary good behavior to Japanese culture, noting the legendary politeness of Japanese people in everyday life.

Culture does play a role, but it is not an adequate explanation. After all, in the right circumstances, Japanese mass behavior can rank with the worst humanity has to offer, as in the Rape of Nanking. There are clearly other factors at work determining mass outbreaks of good and bad behavior among the Japanese, and for that matter, anyone else.

There are, in fact, lessons to be learned from the Japanese good behavior by their friends overseas, lessons which do not require wholesale adoption of Japanese culture, from eating sushi to sleeping on tatami mats. It is more a matter of social structure than culture keeping the Japanese victims of catastrophe acting in the civilized and enlightened manner they have displayed over the past few days.

The Cruise Ship and the Ferryboat

Many years ago, a worldly and insightful Japanese business executive offered me an analogy that gets to heart of the forces keeping the Japanese in line, that has nothing to do with culture. "Japanese people," he told me, "are like passengers on a cruise ship. They know that they are stuck with the same people around them for the foreseeable future, so they are polite, and behave in ways that don't make enemies, and keep everything on a friendly and gracious basis."

"Americans," he said, "are like ferryboat passengers. They know that at the end of a short voyage they will get off and may never see each other again. So if they push ahead of others to get off first, there are no real consequences to face. It is every man for himself."

Despite the existence of massive cities like Tokyo, Osaka, and Nagoya, people in their neighborhoods are well known to those around them. There is little urban anonymity. When I first lived in Japan on a work visa and had my own apartment in a residential neighborhood of Tokyo, in 1971, I was paid a friendly visit by a local policeman. It was a completely routine matter: police are required to keep track of every resident of their beats, and they want to know the basics, such as your work, your age, and your living circumstances. In my circumstances, immigration papers were also of concern, but for Japanese, it would be the koseki, a mandatory official family record kept on a household basis, reporting births, acknowledgements of paternity, adoptions, disruptions of adoptions, deaths, marriages and divorces. Every Japanese is not just an individual, he or she is officially is a member of a household (ie), and the state keeps track.

Following the gathering of my information, the policeman no doubt returned to his local substation (koban), which are found every few blocks in urban areas, to record the information for his colleagues. To an American it seemed quite extraordinary, a violation of privacy. But in Japan a lack of anonymity is the norm.

Soon after the beat cop's visit to me, local merchants began nodding to me as I walked to and from the train station, as if they knew me and acknowledged me. I was fairly certain the word had gone out via omawari san (literally, the honorable gentleman who walks around, a polite colloquial euphemism for the police) that I was a Japanese-speaking American in Japan on legitimate, respectable grounds. For a year or so, I was a member of the community.

The Tohoku Region (literally: the Northeast, in practice, the island of Honshu north of Tokyo) where the earthquake and tsunami hit hardest, is far less urbanized than the rest of the main island of Honshu, and has for many decades seen an exodus of young people to the big cities elsewhere in Japan. Going back to the feudal era (i.e., pre-1868), Tohoku was poorer than the other regions of Japan because its northern climate can support only one crop of rice per year, rather than the two (and in the warmest places, even three) which were cultivated in the rest of Japan. Since Japan's industrialization, Tohoku's relative poverty has diminished, but it is still less economically developed and more rural than its neighbors to the south and west in Japan, and has relatively little in-migration from other parts of Japan.

The main city of Tohoku, the green and (once) lovely city of Sendai, had a million people and a state of the art subway, but is a city of neighborhoods with little anonymity. In the smaller cities and villages, it is almost impossible to misbehave and not be recognized by one's neighbors.

Anthropologists speak of Japan as a "shame culture," as opposed to a "guilt culture," meaning that people are constrained to behave themselves properly by an aversion to being judged negatively by those around them, rather than internalizing a moral imperative. Broadly speaking, that is true today. But it is also true that most contemporary Japanese have internalized a deep respect for private property, that is manifested in a ritual of modern life for children, one which we might do well to emulate. When a child finds a small item belonging to another person, even a one yen coin, a parent takes the child to the local koban and reports lost property. As chronicled by T.R. Reid in his wonderful book about living in Tokyo, Confucius Lives Next Door, the police do not resent this as a waste of time but rather see it as part of moral education, solemnly filling out the appropriate forms, thanking the child and telling him or her if the owner does not appear to claim the item, it will revert to the finder after a certain period of time.

Perhaps more successfully than any other people of the world, the Japanese have evolved a social system capable of ensuring order and good behavior. The vast reservoir of social strength brought Japan through the devastation of World War II, compared to which even the massive problems currently afflicting it, are relatively small. Japan has sustained a major blow, but its robust social order will endure, and ultimately thrive.

Thomas Lifson is editor and publisher of American Thinker. In his academic career, he taught East Asian Studies at Harvard and he was a visiting professor at Japan's National Museum of Ethnology, among other scholarly activities.

http://www.americanthinker.com/2011/03/why_the_japanese_arent_looting.html at March 16, 2011 - 12:00:29 AM CDT

fettpett
03-16-2011, 08:04 AM
this is all on top of their fucked up feelings toward sex. I would guess that a large part of their crime comes from molestation on their mass transit rail lines

Bailey
03-16-2011, 08:09 AM
This is just an unscientific opinion but I think the japs exhibit their antisocial behaviors in scat porn and other such endeavors. :D

fettpett
03-16-2011, 08:14 AM
This is just an unscientific opinion but I think the japs exhibit their antisocial behaviors in scat porn and other such endeavors. :D

it's Tentacle anime porn:eek:, get it right dude :D:p

Calypso Jones
03-16-2011, 08:30 AM
I find this ironic. For the past two days i've listened to the media call the Japanese government secretive and untrustworthy. :D

RobJohnson
03-16-2011, 11:23 AM
I heard on the news that in Japan children in school do not have sub teachers..if the teacher is absent, the kids self monitor themselves. Now this worked for me in school, but I went to a private school... I am not sure if it would work in many public schools here, plus the school district would get an ACLU lawsuit saying the kids were being neglected!

namvet
03-17-2011, 09:26 AM
no blacks

Gingersnap
03-17-2011, 09:41 AM
As Ody's post from AT shows, they have an extremely cohesive culture and this is both a blessing and a curse.

We also have examples of the same types of cultures in the U.S. but they are routinely derided or explained away as being unrealistic, quaint, or antiquated. We have the Amish and many other religious groups who live within their own cultural constraints, we have intentional communities (many where I live) who also operate as an organic whole instead of a bunch of private property owners, and we have small rural communities who always pull together and ride out adversity much, much better than any urban areas do.

The upside is low crime, instant assistance, and easy cooperation. The downside is much less privacy, intense peer pressure, and more or less forced behavioral expectations. Everything is a trade-off no matter how you live.

CueSi
03-17-2011, 12:03 PM
no blacks

Excuse me? Stealing isn't endemic to just one culture.

~QC

namvet
03-17-2011, 12:14 PM
Excuse me? Stealing isn't endemic to just one culture.

~QC

but's its funny they're the prime time looters after any disaster. like in LA after the caine hit

CueSi
03-17-2011, 12:18 PM
but's its funny they're the prime time looters after any disaster. like in LA after the caine hit

I didn't loot after Andrew. No one I knew did. Actually there wasn't a lot of looting in Miami/H'stead after Andrew. So I don't know about "any" disaster.

~QC

CueSi
03-17-2011, 01:13 PM
Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Go drink your green beer... :D

~QC

namvet
03-17-2011, 01:38 PM
http://oi55.tinypic.com/ixfi1j.jpg


http://oi56.tinypic.com/1zp77rq.jpg

im talking about Katrina. remember???

CueSi
03-17-2011, 01:46 PM
You said after any disaster before backtracking to Katrina. Hurricane Andrew counts as a disaster, correct?

~QC

namvet
03-17-2011, 01:49 PM
You said after any disaster before backtracking to Katrina. Hurricane Andrew counts as a disaster, correct?

~QC

correct. also after riots as well. and I dare say there was looting in FLA after andrew

CueSi
03-17-2011, 01:51 PM
correct. also after riots as well. and I dare say there was looting in FLA after andrew

I lived in Andrew's strike zone, there wasn't that much looting, and with the small amount that was going on, it wasn't just black people doing it. Looting post-disaster isn't just endemic to one group of people. But your statement is implying that it is.

I am saying through my own life experience that it is not.

~QC

namvet
03-17-2011, 01:52 PM
and now we have a new black looter

http://oi56.tinypic.com/aqeev.jpg

Gingersnap
03-17-2011, 01:53 PM
It's not skin color - it's a culture of dependency coupled with no regard for private property or the law and those elements cross a lot of racial, language, and religious lines.

People all over the world loot and riot after natural disasters. The Japanese are among the exceptions (at this point in time). Let's focus on that. ;)

namvet
03-17-2011, 01:55 PM
It's not skin color - it's a culture of dependency coupled with no regard for private property or the law and those elements cross a lot of racial, language, and religious lines.

People all over the world loot and riot after natural disasters. The Japanese are among the exceptions (at this point in time). Let's focus on that. ;)

its sad. but a fact that crime amoung blacks is more rampant. that's what im implying. and no secret

CueSi
03-17-2011, 01:58 PM
its sad. but a fact that crime amoung blacks is more rampant. that's what im implying. and no secret

I think the root question is... do you think it's due to culture, or . . . something else?

~QC

namvet
03-17-2011, 02:13 PM
I think the root question is... do you think it's due to culture, or . . . something else?

~QC

no home and no families. that's the problem. they're born in ghetto's living on the streets. no other way to survive except crime. its not their fault.

no mama no papa no uncle sam and no one gives a good god damned !!!

namvet
03-17-2011, 02:18 PM
Why is there no looting in Japan?

In the wake of Japanís deadly earthquake, tsunami and nuclear power plant explosions, we have witnessed the almost indescribable chaos that follows a disaster of this magnitude: loss of life, severe injuries, homelessness, lack of water, food and proper medical care, the physical destruction of towns and cities, and a growing fear of radioactive contamination from power plants that seem beyond anyoneís ability to control.

But one heart-wrenching byproduct of disasters like this one has been missing in Japan, and thatís looting and lawlessness.

Looting is something we see after almost every tragedy; for example: last yearís earthquakes in Haiti and Chile, the floods in England in 2007, and of course Hurricane Katrina back in 2005. It happens when some people whoíve seen life as they know it get tossed out the window feel that all morality has been tossed out too. Itís survival of the fittest and whatever you can get your hands on is yours, no matter who it belongs to.

But thatís not happening in Japan.