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CaughtintheMiddle1990
03-21-2011, 03:28 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkcZAB4_wd4&NR=1

Watch it, please.

Gingersnap
03-21-2011, 03:41 PM
Why? Most of us are familiar with this episode in American history. :confused:

CaughtintheMiddle1990
03-21-2011, 04:19 PM
Why? Most of us are familiar with this episode in American history. :confused:

It's an amazing, yet sad moment. I believe Nixon, for all his flaws, was the last President with any real heart or depth. I believe that seeing these men, our leaders, as PEOPLE, seeing their humanity exposed, is such an eye opening experience. We view these men--even our current President--by their policies, their public face; but all of them are people like us at the end of the day.

fettpett
03-21-2011, 04:32 PM
It's an amazing, yet sad moment. I believe Nixon, for all his flaws, was the last President with any real heart or depth. I believe that seeing these men, our leaders, as PEOPLE, seeing their humanity exposed, is such an eye opening experience. We view these men--even our current President--by their policies, their public face; but all of them are people like us at the end of the day.

really? where were you during Reagan and GW Bush?

Gingersnap
03-21-2011, 04:46 PM
It's an amazing, yet sad moment. I believe Nixon, for all his flaws, was the last President with any real heart or depth. I believe that seeing these men, our leaders, as PEOPLE, seeing their humanity exposed, is such an eye opening experience. We view these men--even our current President--by their policies, their public face; but all of them are people like us at the end of the day.

Which is exactly why so many of them make such poor leaders. Hubris, greed, revenge, indifference, exploitation, and arrogance have always been characteristic of national leaders. What's amazing is that once in a blue moon we get one who isn't just like us.

CaughtintheMiddle1990
03-21-2011, 04:51 PM
really? where were you during Reagan and GW Bush?

I've never seen any hint of regret for any failures by either of those men. No saying, "yeah, I was wrong", always justifications. Show me otherwise if you can.

CaughtintheMiddle1990
03-21-2011, 04:58 PM
Which is exactly why so many of them make such poor leaders. Hubris, greed, revenge, indifference, exploitation, and arrogance have always been characteristic of national leaders. What's amazing is that once in a blue moon we get one who isn't just like us.

Having a leader that's like us is part of our national experience. We haven't had a leader who wasn't just like us since maybe Teddy Roosevelt (a man who was both well read and physically intense), or perhaps going back even further to the Founding Fathers. I say Teddy because he is said to be the most well read president, second only to Thomas Jefferson. Teddy would read several books a day and is said to have read hundreds of thousands of books over his lifetime; He could speak several languages; He bare knuckle boxed, mastered Judo, fought for fun with a cudgel, gave a speech with a bullet in his chest. He was in some ways quite like the Founding Fathers in that he mastered many aspects of life; A perfect balance of the physical and intellectual like the Founding Fathers themselves.

In fact, today, I think, we fear the idea of a leader who isn't JUST LIKE US. Because today, such a leader comes off patrician, elitist, strange, weird, alien. We (I mean America as a whole, not you or I individually) loved seeing LBJ and GW Bush on their ranches, riding horses in their cowboy hats, because we could relate, or appreciate it--the whole mythos surrounding the cowboy, the western man. We loved Reagan cracking jokes because it made us laugh, it made him seem more human, down to Earth. We loved his rugged demeanor because it reminded us of John Wayne. We loved Clinton for his charisma and his post-Hippie demeanor because it reminded so many Baby Boomers of themselves.

Wei Wu Wei
03-21-2011, 06:17 PM
really? where were you during Reagan and GW Bush?

he was in his daddy's ballsack for the first and probably doing fingerpaints for the second

fettpett
03-21-2011, 06:20 PM
he was in his daddy's ballsack for the first and probably doing fingerpaints for the second

each time you come back, you're more and more of an ass

Wei Wu Wei
03-21-2011, 06:23 PM
lol i'm just joshin CITM is pretty cool

CaughtintheMiddle1990
03-21-2011, 06:25 PM
he was in his daddy's ballsack for the first and probably doing fingerpaints for the second

Well, I wasn't doing fingerpaints.
Besides, I wasn't even a wet dream in 1974 or 1977 and yet I can still appreciate Nixon. It's all about the heart, man.

namvet
03-21-2011, 06:28 PM
he didn't do anything any other prez didn't do. he just got caught. if he had owned up to watergate it would have all blown over.

Adam Wood
03-21-2011, 06:32 PM
It's an amazing, yet sad moment. I believe Nixon, for all his flaws, was the last President with any real heart or depth. I believe that seeing these men, our leaders, as PEOPLE, seeing their humanity exposed, is such an eye opening experience. We view these men--even our current President--by their policies, their public face; but all of them are people like us at the end of the day.You should watch this if you think that.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEjXjfxoNXM



Ladies and Gentlemen, I'd planned to speak to you tonight to report on the state of the Union, but the events of earlier today have led me to change those plans. Today is a day for mourning and remembering. Nancy and I are pained to the core by the tragedy of the shuttle Challenger. We know we share this pain with all of the people of our country. This is truly a national loss.

Nineteen years ago, almost to the day, we lost three astronauts in a terrible accident on the ground. But, we've never lost an astronaut in flight; we've never had a tragedy like this. And perhaps we've forgotten the courage it took for the crew of the shuttle; but they, the Challenger Seven, were aware of the dangers, but overcame them and did their jobs brilliantly. We mourn seven heroes: Michael Smith, Dick Scobee, Judith Resnik, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Gregory Jarvis, and Christa McAuliffe. We mourn their loss as a nation together.

For the families of the seven, we cannot bear, as you do, the full impact of this tragedy. But we feel the loss, and we're thinking about you so very much. Your loved ones were daring and brave, and they had that special grace, that special spirit that says, 'Give me a challenge and I'll meet it with joy.' They had a hunger to explore the universe and discover its truths. They wished to serve, and they did. They served all of us.

We've grown used to wonders in this century. It's hard to dazzle us. But for twenty-five years the United States space program has been doing just that. We've grown used to the idea of space, and perhaps we forget that we've only just begun. We're still pioneers. They, the members of the Challenger crew, were pioneers.

And I want to say something to the schoolchildren of America who were watching the live coverage of the shuttle's takeoff. I know it is hard to understand, but sometimes painful things like this happen. It's all part of the process of exploration and discovery. It's all part of taking a chance and expanding man's horizons. The future doesn't belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the brave. The Challenger crew was pulling us into the future, and we'll continue to follow them.

I've always had great faith in and respect for our space program, and what happened today does nothing to diminish it. We don't hide our space program. We don't keep secrets and cover things up. We do it all up front and in public. That's the way freedom is, and we wouldn't change it for a minute. We'll continue our quest in space. There will be more shuttle flights and more shuttle crews and, yes, more volunteers, more civilians, more teachers in space. Nothing ends here; our hopes and our journeys continue. I want to add that I wish I could talk to every man and woman who works for NASA or who worked on this mission and tell them: "Your dedication and professionalism have moved and impressed us for decades. And we know of your anguish. We share it."

There's a coincidence today. On this day 390 years ago, the great explorer Sir Francis Drake died aboard ship off the coast of Panama. In his lifetime the great frontiers were the oceans, and a historian later said, 'He lived by the sea, died on it, and was buried in it.' Well, today we can say of the Challenger crew: Their dedication was, like Drake's, complete.

The crew of the space shuttle Challenger honoured us by the manner in which they lived their lives. We will never forget them, nor the last time we saw them, this morning, as they prepared for the journey and waved goodbye and 'slipped the surly bonds of earth' to 'touch the face of God.'

Thank you.

President Ronald Reagan - January 28, 1986

It's still an absolutely amazing speech all these years later.

Wei Wu Wei
03-21-2011, 06:39 PM
Well, I wasn't doing fingerpaints.
Besides, I wasn't even a wet dream in 1974 or 1977 and yet I can still appreciate Nixon. It's all about the heart, man.

yes the only thing people remember about Nixon is Watergate but he was better than most presidents since

CaughtintheMiddle1990
03-21-2011, 07:40 PM
To me it's just powerful to see a man many vilified and still vilify to this day actually show more humanity than probably a lot of his opponents ever would show. To see this supposedly cold hearted, evil man on the brink of tears, knowing what he did was wrong, knowing he ruined himself...It's moving. I think that Nixon redeemed himself then. He admitted that on some level, he had committed a wrong, he had let America down. And I think the man paid enough, as it were...Because the good things he did as President, in my mind, outweigh the bad.

He's probably one of the most interesting, complex Presidents we ever had because the man was so flawed, yet so brilliant; He had greatness just beyond his reach and that same ruthless ambition which made him a success and brought him close to greatness is what ultimately destroyed him. His life, unlike most Presidents, is like that of a Greek tragedy. He was a casualty of the 1960s era as much as everyone else who lived through it was.

AmPat
03-21-2011, 07:47 PM
It's an amazing, yet sad moment. I believe Nixon, for all his flaws, was the last President with any real heart or depth. I believe that seeing these men, our leaders, as PEOPLE, seeing their humanity exposed, is such an eye opening experience. We view these men--even our current President--by their policies, their public face; but all of them are people like us at the end of the day.

Not O Blah Blah. He shows his lack of character every day. He is a timid, weak, cowardly little pencil necked geek that woke up president. Now he runs and hides from anything difficult or demands a decision. He waits for polls or sure outcomes before he makes a decision.

A man with character would provide leadership and vision. This impostor provides empty words strung together by smarter men than himself.