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View Full Version : " Thirteen illegals All in Marine Camos with the name 'Perez' ."



megimoo
03-22-2011, 06:27 PM
Border Patrol agents recently arrested 13 illegal immigrants disguised as U.S. Marines and riding in a fake military van, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said Tuesday.

The illegal immigrants were clad in Marine uniforms when they were apprehended at the Campo Border Patrol Westbound I-8 checkpoint at 11 p.m. on March 14 near Pine Valley, Calif., border officials said. Two U.S. citizens in the van also were arrested.

After the suspicious white van was subjected to secondary inspection, it was determined that the driver of the vehicle and its front seat passenger were U.S. citizens who were attempting to smuggle 13 illegal immigrants into the United States. All of the vehicle's occupants wore U.S. Marine uniforms, reportedly emblazoned with the name "Perez."

"This effort is an example of the lengths smugglers will go to avoid detection, and the skilled and effective police work and vigilance displayed everyday by Customs and Border Protection personnel," the agency said in a written statement.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/03/22/report-13-illegal-immigrants-apprehended-marine-uniforms/

djones520
03-22-2011, 06:37 PM
This is why the military tries to keep control of uniforms. Your supposed to remove all name and insignia tapes before you dispose of them, and they really prefer you just turn them in if your done using them.

malloc
03-22-2011, 06:39 PM
The Border Patrol agents who noticed the problem shouldn't have said anything. They should have just taken over the driver seat and driven the van to MCRD San Diego. Let the illegals get off on the yellow footprints.....

That would have been priceless.

Odysseus
03-23-2011, 12:14 PM
The Border Patrol agents who noticed the problem shouldn't have said anything. They should have just taken over the driver seat and driven the van to MCRD San Diego. Let the illegals get off on the yellow footprints.....

That would have been priceless.

ROFLOL!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pvNScJgcgo

Novaheart
03-23-2011, 12:50 PM
At least they weren't wearing uniforms that said, Lunquist, MacMannis, or Rothermel. Don't you just love having an operator in Bombay tell you that his name is Brian?

Odysseus
03-23-2011, 01:38 PM
At least they weren't wearing uniforms that said, Lunquist, MacMannis, or Rothermel. Don't you just love having an operator in Bombay tell you that his name is Brian?

http://blogs.friendlybeings.com/fun/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/microsoft-support-bombay.jpg

Please do not be messing with my very good friend Brian. He is most sensitive to such things.

NJCardFan
03-23-2011, 02:02 PM
ROFLOL!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pvNScJgcgo

Can somebody please tell me exactly what in the blue hell this is supposed to accomplish?

Wei Wu Wei
03-23-2011, 02:13 PM
Can somebody please tell me exactly what in the blue hell this is supposed to accomplish?

it's called American Masculinity

Odysseus
03-23-2011, 02:15 PM
Can somebody please tell me exactly what in the blue hell this is supposed to accomplish?

Aside from the fun of it?

It teaches you to think and act under stress. The point of boot camp, in any branch of the service, is to impose as much stress as possible on the trainees and then force them to perform, so that executing missions can be done under the worst possible circumstances. In OCS, the goal is to stress the candidates and force them to make decisions when every decision is the wrong one.

NJCardFan
03-23-2011, 02:22 PM
But the trainee is just standing there. It would make more sense to do this at the range when he's actually firing his weapon so see if he can shoot accurately with a bunch of crazy people yelling at him. When I got this in the academy, I had to really restrain myself not to laugh.

CueSi
03-23-2011, 03:44 PM
it's called American Masculinity

I see what you did there, and you can go fuck yourself. :D

~QC

Odysseus
03-23-2011, 03:58 PM
it's called American Masculinity
And how would you know?

But the trainee is just standing there. It would make more sense to do this at the range when he's actually firing his weapon so see if he can shoot accurately with a bunch of crazy people yelling at him. When I got this in the academy, I had to really restrain myself not to laugh.

You can't see his face, but he's probably either having the same struggle or he's trying to answer one of the barrage of questions, shouts, etc., before he gets dropped.

Wei Wu Wei
03-23-2011, 04:03 PM
What happens if someone burst into laughter? i'm guessing they are made pretty damn miserable and learn pretty quickly but for the love of god it seems impossible not to laugh at least the first time they do this

Wei Wu Wei
03-23-2011, 04:04 PM
when the dude on the right squaks right into his ear like a god damn bird i lost it. i can't stop watching this lmao

Odysseus
03-23-2011, 04:15 PM
What happens if someone burst into laughter? i'm guessing they are made pretty damn miserable and learn pretty quickly but for the love of god it seems impossible not to laugh at least the first time they do this

It's a lot less funny when you're in the middle of it. And bursting into laughter would result in being smoked, that is, being made to do push-ups or some other form of physical exercise until you were no longer capable of movement, then doing it again. I don't expect you to get it, but it's part of an overall process that breaks you down and rebuilds you.

NJCardFan
03-23-2011, 04:55 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8Nf1MK7lts

Novaheart
03-23-2011, 06:49 PM
Aside from the fun of it?



It is, however, stuff like that which keeps a great many people from considering a military career. I had a friend quit boot because he said he wasn't going to put up with being yelled at by (insert unkind epithet), (insert unkind epithet), and (insert unkind epithet) .

Now you can say good riddance, but this is a person who would score very high on the test and bring the averages up.

NJCardFan
03-23-2011, 06:59 PM
It is, however, stuff like that which keeps a great many people from considering a military career. I had a friend quit boot because he said he wasn't going to put up with being yelled at by (insert unkind epithet), (insert unkind epithet), and (insert unkind epithet) .

Now you can say good riddance, but this is a person who would score very high on the test and bring the averages up.
But who would fold like a little girl in a firefight. Being a soldier isn't just about being intelligent. It's about being able to handle yourself when the tough got going as well. If you can't take being yelled at then you can't take being shot at.

djones520
03-24-2011, 02:22 AM
But who would fold like a little girl in a firefight. Being a soldier isn't just about being intelligent. It's about being able to handle yourself when the tough got going as well. If you can't take being yelled at then you can't take being shot at.

Or any of the other countless tasks we can be called on to do in extremely stressful environments.

It all serves a purpose. It is why we are the greatest military this world has ever seen.

Odysseus
03-24-2011, 09:03 AM
It is, however, stuff like that which keeps a great many people from considering a military career. I had a friend quit boot because he said he wasn't going to put up with being yelled at by (insert unkind epithet), (insert unkind epithet), and (insert unkind epithet) .

Now you can say good riddance, but this is a person who would score very high on the test and bring the averages up.
From all appearances, Bradley Manning is a bright guy. There's more to it than that. As NJ and DJ have said, it's about being able to think under stress, to work as part of a team and to be able to put the mission first. The guy who "won't put up with being yelled at" isn't going to put up with long deployments away from home, hardships of the field, orders from above that don't appeal to him, etc. He's an individual, not a member of the team, and his refusal to endure verbal abuse in training is indicative of a lack of maturity and commitment that would have destroyed him and the people around him in combat. So, yeah, good riddance.

But who would fold like a little girl in a firefight. Being a soldier isn't just about being intelligent. It's about being able to handle yourself when the tough got going as well. If you can't take being yelled at then you can't take being shot at.
Or something less dramatic, like just staying at your post when you're bored and cold and don't see the point of what you're doing. I had an epiphany in basic training, which was that the Army had been making Soldiers for more than 200 years, and that I was a link in a very long chain. If I gave myself to the program and took everything that it had to offer, instead of trying to fight it, I would become a better Soldier and man. That led me to realize that no matter how smart I was, I couldn't see everything, and that the people who were giving the orders usually had a view of a bigger picture than I did. It didn't make them right, but it meant that they had a better idea of what was going, and that my part of the mission may not seem very logical or important, but my job was to use my brain to figure out what they wanted and do it to the best of my ability, and if I did that long enough, I'd eventually get to the position where I'd be able to make some of the decisions about how best to employ guys like me.

Or any of the other countless tasks we can be called on to do in extremely stressful environments.

It all serves a purpose. It is why we are the greatest military this world has ever seen.
Yeah, but we could always improve. Don't get complacent, troop. :D

NJCardFan
03-24-2011, 01:03 PM
Or something less dramatic, like just staying at your post when you're bored and cold and don't see the point of what you're doing. I had an epiphany in basic training, which was that the Army had been making Soldiers for more than 200 years, and that I was a link in a very long chain. If I gave myself to the program and took everything that it had to offer, instead of trying to fight it, I would become a better Soldier and man. That led me to realize that no matter how smart I was, I couldn't see everything, and that the people who were giving the orders usually had a view of a bigger picture than I did. It didn't make them right, but it meant that they had a better idea of what was going, and that my part of the mission may not seem very logical or important, but my job was to use my brain to figure out what they wanted and do it to the best of my ability, and if I did that long enough, I'd eventually get to the position where I'd be able to make some of the decisions about how best to employ guys like me.

Yeah, but we could always improve. Don't get complacent, troop. :D
I thought the same way going through the academy. The only difference is that while the instructors were yelling at us like that, all I would think is that these are the same guys who were going to be working side by side with us. I did the best I could and graduated the academy with honors. Then I started working and found out real quick how individualized my line of work is. We aren't a team, just a group of cliques.

linda22003
03-24-2011, 01:07 PM
It's a lot less funny when you're in the middle of it. And bursting into laughter would result in being smoked, that is, being made to do push-ups or some other form of physical exercise until you were no longer capable of movement, then doing it again. I don't expect you to get it, but it's part of an overall process that breaks you down and rebuilds you.

My response would be to slap them, or since their hands are up near their faces, to kick them in the nuts. What they are doing is just RUDE and I would NOT participate in it.

linda22003
03-24-2011, 01:08 PM
But who would fold like a little girl in a firefight. Being a soldier isn't just about being intelligent. It's about being able to handle yourself when the tough got going as well. If you can't take being yelled at then you can't take being shot at.

Yes, but by your own SIDE? You expect to be attacked by the ENEMY.

NJCardFan
03-24-2011, 01:13 PM
Yes, but by your own SIDE? You expect to be attacked by the ENEMY.

Nice of you to comment on something you know nothing about. I have a feeling that in a firefight, there is a bit of yelling orders and such over the din.

linda22003
03-24-2011, 01:15 PM
Nice of you to comment on something you know nothing about. I have a feeling that in a firefight, there is a bit of yelling orders and such over the din.

I would be a VERY bad fit in the military. I really think a lot of that yelling is just because they can, like fraternity hazing. My husband knows a great deal about this and he agrees.

NJCardFan
03-24-2011, 01:18 PM
I would be a VERY bad fit in the military. I really think a lot of that yelling is just because they can, like fraternity hazing. My husband knows a great deal about this and he agrees.

Yeah, you 2 know more than Ody. :rolleyes:

Zafod
03-24-2011, 01:24 PM
Aside from the fun of it?

It teaches you to think and act under stress. The point of boot camp, in any branch of the service, is to impose as much stress as possible on the trainees and then force them to perform, so that executing missions can be done under the worst possible circumstances. In OCS, the goal is to stress the candidates and force them to make decisions when every decision is the wrong one.

bingo

boot is somthing I feel everyone should do just for the experience alone

linda22003
03-24-2011, 01:25 PM
Yeah, you 2 know more than Ody. :rolleyes:

You said that, not I.

Zafod
03-24-2011, 01:26 PM
It's a lot less funny when you're in the middle of it. And bursting into laughter would result in being smoked, that is, being made to do push-ups or some other form of physical exercise until you were no longer capable of movement, then doing it again. I don't expect you to get it, but it's part of an overall process that breaks you down and rebuilds you.

in GA when I got smoked steam actually came off my skin because of the humidity.

And that red dirt....stained my skin it did.

Odysseus
03-24-2011, 05:06 PM
bingo

boot is somthing I feel everyone should do just for the experience alone
Not everyone can hack it.


in GA when I got smoked steam actually came off my skin because of the humidity.
Winter in Kentucky had its own challenges. We used to steam in the cold, especially during PT, but during ruck marches, we'd get hot under our clothes and then, as the sweat dried, we'd be freezing. I learned early on that I could slip my field jacket off my shoulders without removing the ruck or LBE, and then put it back on when I needed to warm up. Later, in OCS, we got the order to unblouse in the heat, and a TAC Officer saw me unbuttoning without removing my web gear. She started screaming at me, demanding to know how I was going to remove my top, and I just pulled my sleeve off through the straps, then did the same on the other side. She stopped halfway through the rant and just stared, and I came to attention, saluted and requested permission to ground my top. :D


And that red dirt....stained my skin it did.

FT Knox had this clay that stuck to our boots in the winter, and which I thought was the hardest thing to clean off that there was, until I got to Iraq. I wasn't there in the summer, but several years later, I came back for OBC and SPLC, and discovered that the clay became a fine powder that stained very nicely and caked when you washed it, but nothing compares to that really fine sand in Iraq. Dry, it got into everything and wet, it would form mud that was like a cross between peanut butter and crazy glue. Nothing would get it off our boots except for heavy brushes mounted at each entrance to a building. You know how you would walk across a gravel field to get mud off your boots? Do that with Iraqi mud and you just get taller.

Zafod
03-24-2011, 05:28 PM
Not everyone can hack it.


Winter in Kentucky had its own challenges. We used to steam in the cold, especially during PT, but during ruck marches, we'd get hot under our clothes and then, as the sweat dried, we'd be freezing. I learned early on that I could slip my field jacket off my shoulders without removing the ruck or LBE, and then put it back on when I needed to warm up. Later, in OCS, we got the order to unblouse in the heat, and a TAC Officer saw me unbuttoning without removing my web gear. She started screaming at me, demanding to know how I was going to remove my top, and I just pulled my sleeve off through the straps, then did the same on the other side. She stopped halfway through the rant and just stared, and I came to attention, saluted and requested permission to ground my top. :D



FT Knox had this clay that stuck to our boots in the winter, and which I thought was the hardest thing to clean off that there was, until I got to Iraq. I wasn't there in the summer, but several years later, I came back for OBC and SPLC, and discovered that the clay became a fine powder that stained very nicely and caked when you washed it, but nothing compares to that really fine sand in Iraq. Dry, it got into everything and wet, it would form mud that was like a cross between peanut butter and crazy glue. Nothing would get it off our boots except for heavy brushes mounted at each entrance to a building. You know how you would walk across a gravel field to get mud off your boots? Do that with Iraqi mud and you just get taller.

I know about the sandbox.

lol get taller, thats about right.

Zafod
03-24-2011, 05:29 PM
I remember trying to peel that shit off my boots.

Like denture cream.

Starbuck
03-24-2011, 07:26 PM
I would be a VERY bad fit in the military. I really think a lot of that yelling is just because they can, like fraternity hazing. My husband knows a great deal about this and he agrees.

The yelling and carrying on that you see is reserved, for the most part, for those who will be at the bottom of the chain of command. It is important that those personnel understand that their opinion does not count. And it really does not count. Really. You're not used to that concept. The service has no room for junior personnel who believe there is something negative about taking orders and doing as they are told.

Later, when training for, say Navy SEAL Teams, all that yelling goes away. At that point you are expected to find the motivation and discipline within yourself, and you are always welcome to quit.

See if you can catch a special on The Discovery Channel called Two Weeks in Hell, and you'll see what I mean. Candidates for Army Special Forces are pushed absolutely to the brink of unconscious exhaustion, but there is never any yelling and getting in their face.

And you just may not be as bad a fit as you think. Aside from age, of course

linda22003
03-24-2011, 08:44 PM
Of course junior personnel do what they're told. It's too bad if that's the only way it can be conveyed.