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Gingersnap
04-20-2011, 01:01 PM
How to Cook an Easter Bunny

By Elena Ferretti

Published April 19, 2011

| FoxNews.com

Variations of brown sugar bourbon-glazed ham or rosemary-garlic roasted lamb, warm, billowy biscuits and roasted root vegetables grace traditional Easter tables, and thankfully so. If you want to go beyond the merely traditional but keep close to the holiday’s theme, consider rabbit. After learning how good they are for you and how great they taste, you may just want Peter Cottontail to ditch the bunny trail and hop on into your Dutch oven.

Rabbit is leaner than chicken, veal or turkey, with less fat and cholesterol. It has half the calories per pound compared to beef and pork and is the most easily digestible protein around. Since it’s both abundant and ubiquitous, low consumption has little to do with availability and lots to do with Thumper (a Cottontail) and Bugs (probably a Lop-Eared Gray.)

“Some people just can’t get beyond that mindset,” says Stephen Edwards. His Aspen Hill Farms in Boyne City, Michigan supplies local three- and four-star resorts and sells nationally through U.S. Wellness Meats. “I’ve had my rump chewed any number of times by people who say, ‘That’s not an appropriate food.’” He just holds his tongue and keeps his cool.

“Speaking for ‘the top of the mitt,’ here in Northern Michigan, there are two types of people who don’t bat an eyelash at eating rabbits,” he says. “Good old country boys, and people who enjoy food. We’ll just call them ‘foodies.’” No one’s going to serve up a Flemish Giant or a Holland Lops, he says of two popular pet breeds.

The Fryer, the Californian and the New Zealand White (it’s actually American) were genetically developed and are specifically raised as meat rabbits. They have good meat-to-bone-ratios, meatier legs, longer spines and grow faster than pet breeds.

Because rabbits mature fast they spend less time on earth than cows or pigs and have no time to accumulate toxins. They reproduce quickly and are grown without hormones or antibiotics. They can be entirely raised on alfalfa, clover or grass, making them a non-competitive species with humans - i.e. they don’t eat what we eat. Simply put, they’re very clean meat.

We raised meat rabbits when I was a kid. Rabbits are cheap to feed and they are tasty (if a little lean). More bunny info and recipes at the link.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2011/04/18/cook-easter-bunny/#ixzz1K5EytYoO

marv
04-20-2011, 03:29 PM
Ahhh, fried rabbit tastes like fried chicken. Fried frog legs tastes like fried chicken. Fried squirrel tastes like fried chicken. Had'em all when I was a kid. :D

Gingersnap
04-20-2011, 03:50 PM
Ahhh, fried rabbit tastes like fried chicken. Fried frog legs tastes like fried chicken. Fried squirrel tastes like fried chicken. Had'em all when I was a kid. :D

LOL! I don't think rabbits taste like chicken but farm-raised bunnies are much, much tastier than their wild brethren. I like to bake rabbit with bacon. Rabbit stew is also much superior to the chicken version (as are the pot pies). If you buy (or make) a shake n bake-type product, use the pork kind on rabbit (the others will work but the pork kind is tastiest).

linda22003
04-20-2011, 03:58 PM
http://www.shangralafamilyfun.com/galp-t/thumper6.gif

fettpett
04-20-2011, 04:44 PM
we raised New Zealand rabbits which are meat rabbits, we didn't eat them obviously, but they sold well at the fair

Gingersnap
04-20-2011, 04:50 PM
Thumper would taste great! Remember, the cuter they are, the more succulent. :)


This obviously doesn't apply to Red Pandas. No one could actually eat a Red Panda.

fettpett
04-20-2011, 04:53 PM
Thumper would taste great! Remember, the cuter they are, the more succulent. :)


This obviously doesn't apply to Red Pandas. No one could actually eat a Red Panda.

too much sinew form running around, want rabbits that sit around and eat all day :p

E.T.
04-23-2011, 07:16 PM
Wild rabbits should only be harvested in a month with the letter 'R' , granny told me so....

Don't count on living on wild rabbit: Though very, very tasty and maximum proteins per pound ( something like 240%) cottontail has virtually no fat whatsoever...brine overnight and soak in a cheap burgandy for about 4 to 8 hours

When I grill a wild one, I have to beat back the dogs and cats with the spatula, true story...I do hate to beat the cats, but, they are wily! They only act like this with the rabbit: venison and hog? they could care less! Why? Can someone explain this?


Cook On!

PoliCon
04-23-2011, 09:15 PM
Ahhh, fried rabbit tastes like fried chicken. Fried frog legs tastes like fried chicken. Fried squirrel tastes like fried chicken. Had'em all when I was a kid. :D

used to eat squirrel and rabbit as kids. mom used to tell us we were eating skinless chicken . . . :D

PoliCon
04-23-2011, 09:16 PM
Thumper would taste great! Remember, the cuter they are, the more succulent. :)


This obviously doesn't apply to Red Pandas. No one could actually eat a Red Panda.

Of course not. You'd never get the chance. They'd stun you with their cuteness and then eat your brains if you even tried. :rolleyes:

Odysseus
04-24-2011, 12:59 PM
Thumper would taste great! Remember, the cuter they are, the more succulent. :)
This obviously doesn't apply to Red Pandas. No one could actually eat a Red Panda.
They don't taste like chicken?

Of course not. You'd never get the chance. They'd stun you with their cuteness and then eat your brains if you even tried. :rolleyes:

Rabbits aren't exactly pushovers either.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IM3z0dd5zw&feature=fvst

BTW, people have been after the Easter Bunny for years. Remember this?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-R4jPvfk_k

Zathras
04-24-2011, 02:50 PM
Rabbits aren't exactly pushovers either.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IM3z0dd5zw&feature=fvst

You just need to have the right weapon to deal with the Vorpal Bunny....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOrgLj9lOwk

ColonialMarine0431
04-24-2011, 03:07 PM
Mommy! Theyr'e talking 'bout cooking the Easter Wabbit!!!