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View Full Version : Fallout: The state of Virginia drops the law firm that dropped the House’s DOMA case



PoliCon
04-29-2011, 06:14 PM
Emily Belz

Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli dropped the state’s business with King & Spaulding after the Atlanta-based law firm dropped the U.S. House of Representatives’ case defending the Defense of Marriage Act earlier this week.

Cuccinelli told the firm in a biting letter Wednesday that he did not object to working with law firms who defend objectionable people or causes, like the firm’s work defending terrorist suspects. But he said the firm’s unprofessional behavior—taking the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) case and then dropping it after coming under pressure from gay rights groups—was the cause for his decision to terminate its appointment as special counsel to the attorney general.

“[I]t is crucial for us to be able to trust and rely on the fact that our outside counsel will not desert Virginia due to pressure by an outside group or groups,” he wrote. “Virginia seeks firms of commitment, courage, strength, and toughness, and unfortunately what the world has learned of King & Spaulding is that your firm utterly lacks those qualities.” Cuccinelli went on to call the firm’s decision to drop the DOMA case an “obsequious act of weakness.”

“For future reference, your firm is not welcome to reapply for special counsel status at any time as long as I am the attorney general of Virginia,” he concluded. The Washington Examiner first reported Cuccinelli’s decision.

King & Spaulding has not yet responded to the letter. The attorney general had worked with the firm since 2009, contracting out legal work, but Cuccinelli said he could not leave cases, like one involving the University of Virginia Medical Center, “in the hands of a law firm of such weakness.”

As a result of the decision to drop the DOMA case, the firm also lost one of its prominent partners, Paul Clement, the solicitor general under President George W. Bush. Clement resigned to continue as counsel on the DOMA case as part of a smaller law firm in Washington.

DOMA, which Congress passed in 1996 and President Bill Clinton signed into law, defines marriage as between one man and one woman, and bars federal benefits for same-sex couples. The law faces a number of court challenges. Previously the Justice Department had defended it as established law, despite President Obama’s personal opposition, but in February the president and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder announced that they no longer deemed the law constitutional and the Justice Department would no longer defend it in court. A number of lawyers said the administration’s defense of the law was half-hearted to begin with.

Congress, which passed the law, is likely the only other entity that has standing in court to defend the law, so the House convened a rare legal advisory group in March that contracted with King & Spalding to defend the statute. House Democratic leaders objected to the decision. Once the firm agreed to take the case in April, gay rights groups began to exert pressure. Human Rights Campaign and Georgia Equality had planned a protest Tuesday morning outside King & Spalding’s Atlanta offices, and the two groups planned to buy ads attacking the firm. Several gay rights legal groups publicly condemned the firm before it withdrew from the case.

Robert Hays Jr., chairman of King & Spalding, said in a statement that his firm withdrew from the case because it had not done enough “vetting” before taking the case and he apologized “for the challenges this may have created.”

FROM - http://www.worldmag.com/webextra/17982

hazlnut
04-29-2011, 06:33 PM
Jeez, Virginia, Homophobia is so 1996...

PoliCon
04-29-2011, 06:58 PM
I love how you guys always paint any opposition to your agenda as some sort of bigotry. Racism . . . homophobia . . . :rolleyes:

lacarnut
04-29-2011, 07:23 PM
Jeez, Virginia, Homophobia is so 1996...

Go hug a Fag and you will feel better. :eek:

Zathras
04-29-2011, 08:11 PM
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_aqJmo_zPg9I/TFC6W8C2nbI/AAAAAAAAAAk/7Rn8D8nN-9Q/s1600/Herp_Derp_by_Helrouis.jpg

Fixed

Odysseus
04-29-2011, 10:23 PM
Jeez, Virginia, Homophobia is so 1996...

Because naturally, marriage is whatever you want it to be, and anyone who says otherwise is a bigot, right?

Novaheart
04-29-2011, 10:56 PM
“[I]t is crucial for us to be able to trust and rely on the fact that our outside counsel will not desert Virginia due to pressure by an outside group or groups,” he wrote.

I wasn't aware that Americans or Virginians became "outside groups" by virtue of being gay. Naturally, it amuses me when someone named Cuccinelli presumes to refer to me as an outsider. After all, we had only lived in Virginia for 300 years when the first Cuccinelli was born in my country.

Gingersnap
04-29-2011, 11:08 PM
I wasn't aware that Americans or Virginians became "outside groups" by virtue of being gay. Naturally, it amuses me when someone named Cuccinelli presumes to refer to me as an outsider. After all, we had only lived in Virginia for 300 years when the first Cuccinelli was born in my country.

Referring to someone's ancestral origins as a means of denigrating their opinion seems kind of "racist", dude. LMAO!

Novaheart
04-29-2011, 11:21 PM
Referring to someone's ancestral origins as a means of denigrating their opinion seems kind of "racist", dude. LMAO!

I've always considered someone making a territorial claim to be an invitation to a pissing contest, in this case one I am almost certain to win.

lacarnut
04-30-2011, 12:00 AM
I wasn't aware that Americans or Virginians became "outside groups" by virtue of being gay. Naturally, it amuses me when someone named Cuccinelli presumes to refer to me as an outsider. After all, we had only lived in Virginia for 300 years when the first Cuccinelli was born in my country.

It amuses me when a fag like you inserts themselves into the business of a state's right to hire and fire whomever law firm they choose.

CueSi
04-30-2011, 02:19 AM
He did something that black people call, "My whole thing is this..." the story didn't say if he was for DOMA. His objection was over the firms action of dropping it's defense, not out of principle, but out of pressure. Lawyers have to do slimy shit all the time, because the law is the law. Yes, taking a case because you believe or don't believe in it is a plus, but refusal to see a client through after taking a case. . . not even as a matter of principle, but because of pressure?

THAT IS WEAK. This isn't about homophobia. That's a distraction. It's about doing a job you were assigned and paid to do. The firm knew what they were getting into, and to back out now is a pussy move.

~QC

Rockntractor
04-30-2011, 03:03 AM
He did something that black people call, "My whole thing is this..." the story didn't say if he was for DOMA. His objection was over the firms action of dropping it's defense, not out of principle, but out of pressure. Lawyers have to do slimy shit all the time, because the law is the law. Yes, taking a case because you believe or don't believe in it is a plus, but refusal to see a client through after taking a case. . . not even as a matter of principle, but because of pressure?

THAT IS WEAK. This isn't about homophobia. That's a distraction. It's about doing a job you were assigned and paid to do. The firm knew what they were getting into, and to back out now is a pussy move.

~QC

You are so right, I would never consider hiring a firm for anything no matter how small with this on their record!

txradioguy
04-30-2011, 04:04 AM
Referring to someone's ancestral origins as a means of denigrating their opinion seems kind of "racist", dude. LMAO!

Except when it's done to a Conservative/Republican...then it's called "perfectly rational thinking".

Novaheart
04-30-2011, 12:17 PM
It amuses me when a fag like you inserts themselves into the business of a state's right to hire and fire whomever law firm they choose.

Another wetback heard from?

NJCardFan
04-30-2011, 12:44 PM
I wasn't aware that Americans or Virginians became "outside groups" by virtue of being gay. Naturally, it amuses me when someone named Cuccinelli presumes to refer to me as an outsider. After all, we had only lived in Virginia for 300 years when the first Cuccinelli was born in my country.

So you're justifying your position with xenophobia? :rolleyes:

lacarnut
04-30-2011, 01:27 PM
Another wetback heard from?

You have me confused with one of your queer buddies.

Novaheart
04-30-2011, 02:56 PM
So you're justifying your position with xenophobia? :rolleyes:

Xenophobia is such a strong word. Don't take it poissenilly.

Odysseus
04-30-2011, 04:17 PM
I wasn't aware that Americans or Virginians became "outside groups" by virtue of being gay. Naturally, it amuses me when someone named Cuccinelli presumes to refer to me as an outsider. After all, we had only lived in Virginia for 300 years when the first Cuccinelli was born in my country.
They are outside groups to the lawsuit, i.e., they are not litigants.

He did something that black people call, "My whole thing is this..." the story didn't say if he was for DOMA. His objection was over the firms action of dropping it's defense, not out of principle, but out of pressure. Lawyers have to do slimy shit all the time, because the law is the law. Yes, taking a case because you believe or don't believe in it is a plus, but refusal to see a client through after taking a case. . . not even as a matter of principle, but because of pressure?

THAT IS WEAK. This isn't about homophobia. That's a distraction. It's about doing a job you were assigned and paid to do. The firm knew what they were getting into, and to back out now is a pussy move.

~QC
Exactly. A lawyer who drops a case in mid-trial must have compelling grounds to do so, and those grounds must be related to the case. For example, if an attorney found that his client had suborned perjury, an attorney could ask the court for relief, but it is not automatic. Simply deciding that you no longer like the case because your client's position is not popular undermines the whole concept of the right to a defense.


Xenophobia is such a strong word. Don't take it poissenilly.

As opposed to homophobia or bigotry?

Sonnabend
04-30-2011, 07:11 PM
But he said the firm’s unprofessional behavior—taking the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) case and then dropping it after coming under pressure from gay rights groups—was the cause for his decision to terminate its appointment as special counsel to the attorney general.

“[i]t is crucial for us to be able to trust and rely on the fact that our outside counsel will not desert Virginia due to pressure by an outside group or groups,” he wrote. “Virginia seeks firms of commitment, courage, strength, and toughness, and unfortunately what the world has learned of King & Spaulding is that your firm utterly lacks those qualities.”

Translation: you caved in to a pressure group instead of doing what we told you to do.

You're fired.

txradioguy
05-01-2011, 03:06 AM
Translation: you caved in to a pressure group instead of doing what we told you to do.

You're fired.

With this being a Virginia law firm...most likely they caved to what ever K Street Lobbyists they count as clients...not some little known state level anti-DOMA group.

Either way it's wrong.