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Gingersnap
05-02-2011, 10:29 AM
Two thirds of joggers may be damaging themselves

Published: 27 Apr 11 09:06 CET
Online: http://www.thelocal.de/society/20110427-34641.html
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Up to two thirds of casual joggers may actually be risking their health by overstraining themselves and ignoring body stress and pain, a study commissioned by German health insurer AOK has found.

Professor Henning Allmer from the Cologne Institute for Applied Health Sciences has surveyed more than 10,000 joggers on behalf of AOK and concluded that many joggers may be doing harm as well as good.

“People who regularly overstrain their bodies and don’t listen to the body’s signs when jogging have to expect in the end permanent damage, tiredness and exhaustion,” Allmer said this week, according to daily Die Welt. “Ultimately even muscular and cardiovascular problems may arise.”

Allmer developed a questionnaire for joggers to help them determine whether their running style is safe or could be damaging. The test is available on the health insurer’s website.

Between December 2006 and November 2010, more than 10,000 German runners took the test, the paper reported.

Seven in 10 of the respondents to the online test were women. Four fifths of respondents said they jogged alone with just one in five jogging with others. Seven out of 10 were aged between 21 and 50.

Questions included, “Do you get out of breath?”, “Do you take a break?” and “Do you get muscular cramps or some other pain?”

Based on the answers, respondents were classed into three categories. Joggers who took a break when they got a cramp or some other reaction such as an unusually high pulse were considered to be healthy runners.

But those for whom the strain and effort was the main feature of jogging, who were clearly overstepping their physical limits and for whom pain and exhaustion were the dominant sensations after a jog could be considered unhealthy runners who could be doing damage, Allmer said.

The only way I'd run is out of a burning a building.

The Local (http://www.thelocal.de/society/20110427-34641.html)

djones520
05-02-2011, 10:32 AM
I blame the military. I experience pain everytime I run. But if I fail my PT test, it has huge impacts on my career. If I visit a doctor about it, I only have 1 year to recover before I get medical boarded.

Last year I spent 6 months trying to recover from some of my issues, and today I'm still experiencing the same symptoms.

Now, I can do what needs to be done to pass. But I don't know what impacts it will have on me after I get out of the military.

noonwitch
05-02-2011, 10:34 AM
I always thought that jogging was less healthy for the knees than running. The slower motion involved seems to put more weight on the knees and not balance it throughout the legs.

Arroyo_Doble
05-02-2011, 10:35 AM
I'm a runner. Have been for decades. Pain has never been that uncommon.

Gingersnap
05-02-2011, 10:44 AM
I'm a runner. Have been for decades. Pain has never been that uncommon.

Let me introduce you to a couple of crazy concepts:

http://i54.tinypic.com/2efm1pu.jpg

http://i51.tinypic.com/10gd3me.jpg

Arroyo_Doble
05-02-2011, 10:48 AM
Let me introduce you to a couple of crazy concepts:

http://i54.tinypic.com/2efm1pu.jpg

http://i51.tinypic.com/10gd3me.jpg



I am too old to change.

Starbuck
05-02-2011, 12:17 PM
What model bike is that? Wife thought it was pretty cool. Her colors, even!

I'm a stretcher and walker..about 4 miles, maybe 5 times a week.....streeeeetch every day. Just like my dogs. They're smart.

Novaheart
05-02-2011, 12:43 PM
I blame the military. I experience pain everytime I run. But if I fail my PT test, it has huge impacts on my career. If I visit a doctor about it, I only have 1 year to recover before I get medical boarded.

Last year I spent 6 months trying to recover from some of my issues, and today I'm still experiencing the same symptoms.

Now, I can do what needs to be done to pass. But I don't know what impacts it will have on me after I get out of the military.

Is the goal that you have the stamina to do the run? Or is the goal that you be able to do a Pheidippides?

If the goal is fitness, then one should be able to substitute bicycling for running. If the goal is running, then using bicycles to generate fitness while saving the ankles and knees would still seem to make sense.

Novaheart
05-02-2011, 12:44 PM
I always thought that jogging was less healthy for the knees than running. The slower motion involved seems to put more weight on the knees and not balance it throughout the legs.

I thought that bouncing up and down was bad for the kidneys.

Zafod
05-02-2011, 12:46 PM
cardio bunnies.....

MountainMan
05-02-2011, 11:35 PM
I'm a runner. Have been for decades. Pain has never been that uncommon.Till I got married, I used to run 20 miles a week.....Now I get tired just thinking about it..


Though I am considering trying to start again....Just worried about my knees.

Gingersnap
05-02-2011, 11:40 PM
Till I got married, I used to run 20 miles a week.....Now I get tired just thinking about it..


Though I am considering trying to start again....Just worried about my knees.

Why start again? It's not like you're in the right demographic for a quick knee-replacement within the evolving health care situation. Get a bike. At least you can fix the bike yourself if it goes to pot.

djones520
05-03-2011, 10:36 AM
Is the goal that you have the stamina to do the run? Or is the goal that you be able to do a Pheidippides?

If the goal is fitness, then one should be able to substitute bicycling for running. If the goal is running, then using bicycles to generate fitness while saving the ankles and knees would still seem to make sense.

There is several differant reasons that they "justify" it. I can do cardio any way, but the test has to be done as a run. And biking, and even doing the elliptical, is just no substitute for running. Especially when so much of my career rests on how quickly I can do it.