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bijou
05-10-2011, 12:42 PM
When her daughter was born, Nina wanted to surround her child with every blessing in the world. So, she gave her seven names, including Astravaganza and Angeletta, that were Russian, Greek, and even made-up names for Hope, Stars, Butterfly, and more. Today, Nina’s daughter, 15, simply goes by Lola (not on the roster). Her room is decorated with “Hello, My Name Is” stickers, one of which reads: “My name is too long to fit on this tag.” Nina, who like all the parents interviewed asked that only her first name be used, chuckles that when she meets Lola’s friends with “short, sweet names, like Grace,” she thinks: “Oh, that might have been nice, too!”
...
When their first child was born, Allison and her husband looked at him and knew: He was a Miles. But when their second arrived — weighing in at 10 pounds, 12 ounces — they weren’t so sure. “He was so squished that you couldn’t even really see his features,” she says of her then-newborn son. Allison wanted to leave the birth certificate blank and change it later, but her husband didn’t want to bring their baby home nameless. So, they recorded him as Eli.

But after several weeks, Allison realized that her baby was not an Eli at all — he was, without question, a Cailean. So, she and her husband spent more than a year filing court papers, standing before a judge, presenting arguments for why they wanted to change their child’s name. “Names, to me, are who you are,” she explains. “I want my children to really be, to own, their names.” So, was it worth it? Absolutely....

Read more: http://moms.today.com/_news/2011/05/09/6597774-astravaganza-when-parents-regret-their-kids-names?gt1=43001

Poor Lola. :(

NJCardFan
05-10-2011, 12:57 PM
Some parents should be publicly flogged for some of the names they give their kids.

Gingersnap
05-10-2011, 01:09 PM
I kind of feel sorry for kids with trendy names. First of all, it dates you like nothing else. There are names that are so much a part of a particular time/place/mindset that you can never avoid it. Hippie names like River or Sunshine come to mind as well as the glut of Jennifers and Jasons.

Secondly, you have to be prepared to have that name mangled in pronunciation and hopelessly misspelled forever. Other people are just not going to agree with your Mom's pronunciation of Nevaeh or Melayna. A real phonetic spelling involves using characters your Mom probably can't recognize so her fake spell-it-the-way-you-say-it" strategy is doomed.

Thirdly, a parent's interest in real or imagined ancestry may not be shared by the child or may be seen as dull or annoying by the child. This is particularly true if the name is fake ancestral, belongs to the wrong ancestry, is just a super trendy name from 1880 with no real ethnic importance, or just sounds exotic. Even if the name is an excellent example of a traditional (name the ethnicity) name, if your family doesn't practice that culture at home on a day-to-day basis, the child may feel like the name is hypocritical or oppressive.

Lastly, trendy names may not really fit all stages of life.

ABC in Georgia
05-10-2011, 01:10 PM
Some parents should be publicly flogged for some of the names they give their kids.

Flogging isn't good enough. Lobotomies would be better! :D

A friend and I were in a very quiet Barnes and Noble or whatever it was, a few years back, when this little out of control girl went running and screaming throughout the store.

Her mother suddenly yelled ... "Destiny! Get back here!"

The poor kid. I'll never forget it. We laughed out loud!

Then again, what about Chastity Bono for a name, huh? :rolleyes:

~ ABC

djones520
05-10-2011, 01:12 PM
My sister and her fiance are naming their kid Odin.

So yeah... I got one in my family....

Gingersnap
05-10-2011, 01:16 PM
My sister and her fiance are naming their kid Odin.

So yeah... I got one in my family....

Uh.......why? Do they expect the kid to be eaten by a wolf during Ragnarök?

NJCardFan
05-10-2011, 01:32 PM
One of the dumbest was a guy I used to work with and his wife named their kid Mason Storm after the Steven Segal character in Hard to Kill. Hollywood stars are some of the worst. David and Courtney Srquette naming their kid Coco is one. Gwenneth Paltro's daughter is named Apple. Of course there is always Frank Zappa naming his kids Moon Unit and Dweezle.

pyackog
05-10-2011, 01:47 PM
Wait, they named me what? Ashlee Simpson, Pete Wentz and their son Bronx Mowgli: Cause for name inspiration, or regret?

Bronx Mowgli Wentz? I hope all these parents today are also teaching their kids how to fight because they're gonna need to on the schoolyard with these names.

djones520
05-10-2011, 01:50 PM
Uh.......why? Do they expect the kid to be eaten by a wolf during Ragnarök?

Don't get me going. My sister has a lot of stupid in her head sometimes.

marv
05-10-2011, 01:58 PM
Makes you wonder about how all the kids named "Obama" are gonna feel a couple of decades from now....

fettpett
05-10-2011, 03:07 PM
One of the dumbest was a guy I used to work with and his wife named their kid Mason Storm after the Steven Segal character in Hard to Kill. Hollywood stars are some of the worst. David and Courtney Srquette naming their kid Coco is one. Gwenneth Paltro's daughter is named Apple. Of course there is always Frank Zappa naming his kids Moon Unit and Dweezle.

Apple isn't as bad as some of them

Look at Nick Cage, he named his son Kal-El

linda22003
05-10-2011, 03:28 PM
Then you have the occasional offbeat names that are deeply cool, like Penn Jillette's daughter....

Moxie Crimefighter Jillette.

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1144/730112777_729809005e.jpg

Phillygirl
05-10-2011, 06:05 PM
Reilly. Great name for a dog...not so much for a daughter. :rolleyes:

Gingersnap
05-10-2011, 07:41 PM
Reilly. Great name for a dog...not so much for a daughter. :rolleyes:

As someone with a decidedly androgynous name (I was named after my Uncle's nickname of all things), I can tell you that it's not all it's cracked up to be. I am constantly mistaken for a male in correspondence and emails which is insulting given that I work in female-light, hard science field. I never had the luxury of demanding that I be known by my full girly name during certain High Feminine points of my life. My name is not one I would ever consider passing along (even if I had kids). Being a mere nickname (and this would also be true for surnames as first names), there is no heritage, historical associations, religious usage or other exotic baggage to elevate my name as a first name. Basically, it was a bad decision on my mother's part and one made completely on impulse.

Thanks Mom.

Calypso Jones
05-10-2011, 07:43 PM
I had a client who named her son, Smoke.

Gingersnap
05-10-2011, 07:51 PM
I had a client who named her son, Smoke.

Menthol or Lights?

Constitutionally Speaking
05-10-2011, 08:40 PM
A couple I know named their daughter Clementia.

I am NOT kidding.