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Gingersnap
05-10-2011, 05:10 PM
25 Manners Every Kid Should Know By Age 9


* by Parents.com, on Tue May 3, 2011 1:21pm PDT

Helping your child master these simple rules of etiquette will get him noticed -- for all the right reasons.
By David Lowry, Ph.D.

Your child's rude 'tude isn't always intentional. Sometimes kids just don't realize it's impolite to interrupt, pick their nose, or loudly observe that the lady walking in front of them has a large behind. And in the hustle and bustle of daily life, busy moms and dads don't always have the time to focus on etiquette. But if you reinforce these 25 must-do manners, you'll raise a polite, kind, well-liked child.-

Manner #1

When asking for something, say "Please."

Manner #2

When receiving something, say "Thank you."

Related: Kid-Made Thank You Notes

Manner #3

Do not interrupt grown-ups who are speaking with each other unless there is an emergency. They will notice you and respond when they are finished talking.

Manner #4

If you do need to get somebody's attention right away, the phrase "excuse me" is the most polite way for you to enter the conversation.

Manner #5

When you have any doubt about doing something, ask permission first. It can save you from many hours of grief later.
Manner #6

The world is not interested in what you dislike. Keep negative opinions to yourself, or between you and your friends, and out of earshot of adults.

More at the link.

Shine Yahoo (http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/parenting/25-manners-every-kid-should-know-by-age-9-2480238/)

djones520
05-10-2011, 05:14 PM
My kid's not even 3 yet, but he's off to a good start on those.

jendf
05-10-2011, 05:43 PM
Manner #19

As you walk through a door, look to see if you can hold it open for someone else.

It's incredible how many people will let the door slam in my face.

And chivalry is not dead but awfully rare these days. When a man actually does hold the door open for me, I get damn near orgasmic.

Another manner I would add to the list is elevator etiquette. For the love of God, please let me leave the elevator before you barrel on in.

NJCardFan
05-10-2011, 05:47 PM
It's incredible how many people will let the door slam in my face.

And chivalry is not dead but awfully rare these days. When a man actually does hold the door open for me, I get damn near orgasmic.

Another manner I would add to the list is elevator etiquette. For the love of God, please let me leave the elevator before you barrel on in.

I'll do you one better. I always hold the door open for people. You'd be amazed how many never say thank you.

Phillygirl
05-10-2011, 05:51 PM
Interesting. These rules were ingrained in me as a kid. For the most part, I continue to follow them (except for saying mean things about other people...I definitely am not very good about that part).

Jen...I agree with you on elevator etiquette and holding the door. Today, two people held the door for me and I was surprised. One of them even waited for me, as I was daydreaming a bit before I entered the courthouse and didn't realize he was holding the door for me to pass through.

Gingersnap
05-10-2011, 07:43 PM
Interesting. These rules were ingrained in me as a kid. For the most part, I continue to follow them (except for saying mean things about other people...I definitely am not very good about that part).

Jen...I agree with you on elevator etiquette and holding the door. Today, two people held the door for me and I was surprised. One of them even waited for me, as I was daydreaming a bit before I entered the courthouse and didn't realize he was holding the door for me to pass through.

This surprises me. Guys hold the door for me all the time (as do a lot of women). Maybe the West is just more polite. :confused:

MrsSmith
05-10-2011, 07:58 PM
This surprises me. Guys hold the door for me all the time (as do a lot of women). Maybe the West is just more polite. :confused:

The west and midwest are definitely more polite.

People hold the door open for all of us fairly regularly...and they get a chorus of thank yous. Even my 2 year old granddaughter is starting to repeat it! :D

#3 on this list is one of my pet peeves. I can't count the number of people I see that stop their adult conversations to speak to an interrupting child...and actually talk to the child. :mad: (I have stopped the conversation to "speak" to my child, also, but it's always "Is anyone bleeding? Then be quiet!") I can't understand why so many parents put up with such rude behavior.

Gingersnap
05-10-2011, 08:06 PM
The one I see a lot that astonishes me is #23. I can't tell you the number of children between 4 and 10 I see who eat with their hands inappropriately. It's like they don't have any experience with food that doesn't come out of a sack. :confused:

ABC in Georgia
05-10-2011, 08:15 PM
More at the link.

Shine Yahoo (http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/parenting/25-manners-every-kid-should-know-by-age-9-2480238/)

Ginger ... I agree 100% with the article.

As a parent, I really did try to instill these rules.

As an *adult* ... well, I have more or less ignored #5 ... I think it was. The one about asking permission first.

A few years back, when I was still living in Florida, used to write comedy for a Health Forum (for adults) and my motto was: Better to beg forgiveness, than to ask permission.

Sorry about that! :p

~ ABC

fettpett
05-10-2011, 08:33 PM
It's incredible how many people will let the door slam in my face.

And chivalry is not dead but awfully rare these days. When a man actually does hold the door open for me, I get damn near orgasmic.

Another manner I would add to the list is elevator etiquette. For the love of God, please let me leave the elevator before you barrel on in.

damn...I should come hold doors open for you



I'll do you one better. I always hold the door open for people. You'd be amazed how many never say thank you.

I have experienced the same thing and I hold the door open as often as I notice people

Articulate_Ape
05-10-2011, 08:47 PM
Manner #26: If you are 14 years old and don't have at least a summer job, run away with the carnival.

Manner #27: If you are over the age of 14 and younger than 18 and don't have at least a summer job, find a carnival and run away with them.

Manner #28: If you are over the age of 18 and not a full-time student, join the military or find a carnival and run away with them.

Manner #29: If you are age 25 or more and we payed for your college and you have a great job, you know where to send the thank you checks.

Manner #30: If you are age 25 or more and we payed for your college and you have a great job and you can't find our address, look for the nearest carnival.

PoliCon
05-10-2011, 08:59 PM
Manner #3

Do not interrupt grown-ups who are speaking with each other unless there is an emergency. They will notice you and respond when they are finished talking.


U don't think anyone teaches this one any more. :(

PoliCon
05-10-2011, 09:01 PM
Manner #26: If you are 14 years old and don't have at least a summer job, run away with the carnival.

Manner #27: If you are over the age of 14 and younger than 18 and don't have at least a summer job, find a carnival and run away with them.

Manner #28: If you are over the age of 18 and not a full-time student, join the military or find a carnival and run away with them.

Manner #29: If you are age 25 or more and we payed for your college and you have a great job, you know where to send the thank you checks.

Manner #30: If you are age 25 or more and we payed for your college and you have a great job and you can't find our address, look for the nearest carnival.

you monkeys and your obsessions with carnivals. :rolleyes:

PoliCon
05-10-2011, 09:08 PM
When I was a tween I spent some time as a guest with a friend and his family - I did not realize he was amazingly crazily wealthy! I knew him because his grandparents and my grandparents had summer cottages next door to each other. So anyhow - I was invited to spend a couple of weeks with them one summer and while I was there - his parents had a formal dinner and I was expected join them. The butler proceeded to drill me on proper table etiquette. It was a real eye opener for me at the time. I am to this day amazed by the number of people who do not know how to properly hold a fork. :eek:

Rockntractor
05-10-2011, 09:13 PM
When I was a tween I spent some time as a guest with a friend and his family - I did not realize he was amazingly crazily wealthy! I knew him because his grandparents and my grandparents had summer cottages next door to each other. So anyhow - I was invited to spend a couple of weeks with them one summer and while I was there - his parents had a formal dinner and I was expected join them. The butler proceeded to drill me on proper table etiquette. It was a real eye opener for me at the time. I am to this day amazed by the number of people who do not know how to properly hold a fork. :eek:

http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv230/upyourstruly/0511-0810-2816-0608_Cartoon_of_a_Cowboy_with_a_Pitchfork_clipart_ image.png

Phillygirl
05-10-2011, 09:55 PM
This surprises me. Guys hold the door for me all the time (as do a lot of women). Maybe the West is just more polite. :confused:

I think. It is more polite. But I also work at a courthose. People tend to forget their manners there (the visitors, not the employees or other regulars)

djones520
05-10-2011, 10:00 PM
damn...I should come hold doors open for you




I have experienced the same thing and I hold the door open as often as I notice people

I went on the food run tonight, and opened the door for a woman while she was leaving. I was in uniform as well. :D

Calypso Jones
05-10-2011, 10:42 PM
When I was a tween I spent some time as a guest with a friend and his family - I did not realize he was amazingly crazily wealthy! I knew him because his grandparents and my grandparents had summer cottages next door to each other. So anyhow - I was invited to spend a couple of weeks with them one summer and while I was there - his parents had a formal dinner and I was expected join them. The butler proceeded to drill me on proper table etiquette. It was a real eye opener for me at the time. I am to this day amazed by the number of people who do not know how to properly hold a fork. :eek:

and that proper way is?

Calypso Jones
05-10-2011, 10:43 PM
It wouldn't hurt for many adults to see these rules of etiquette.

MrsSmith
05-10-2011, 10:49 PM
When I was a tween I spent some time as a guest with a friend and his family - I did not realize he was amazingly crazily wealthy! I knew him because his grandparents and my grandparents had summer cottages next door to each other. So anyhow - I was invited to spend a couple of weeks with them one summer and while I was there - his parents had a formal dinner and I was expected join them. The butler proceeded to drill me on proper table etiquette. It was a real eye opener for me at the time. I am to this day amazed by the number of people who do not know how to properly hold a fork. :eek:

Try learning to eat European style. After drilling us in American table manners, my mom also made us learn how to eat everything with the fork in our left hand, held correctly, and the knife in our right. And eat everything with the fork and knife, even hamburgers and fried chicken! :D Oh, and do NOT forget to lay your utensils down between SMALL bites! :D

Rockntractor
05-10-2011, 10:52 PM
Oh, and do NOT forget to lay your utensils down between SMALL bites! :D

How could you get fat?:confused:

eagleexpress
05-11-2011, 12:08 AM
I may have to foward those rules to a few friend their children are hell :D

noonwitch
05-11-2011, 08:49 AM
This surprises me. Guys hold the door for me all the time (as do a lot of women). Maybe the West is just more polite. :confused:




Same here. It's a more equal thing now, though, than a gender-based one. I hold the door open for anyone whose hands are full, for the obvious situations like parents with a bunch of little ones or the handicapped, and for pretty much anyone that is coming in right after me.


Elderly black men won't let me get the door for them, though, they always hold the door for me unless they are in a wheelchair or something.

Novaheart
05-11-2011, 09:32 AM
Some things have fallen by the wayside for practical reasons or as a consequence of some other change.

Many of the child respect for adults rules are lost because their parents aren't worthy of respect, but others are because "stranger proofing" children in essence teaches them to be disrespectful of adults they are not specifically instructed to obey.

Even so, I am surprised at the number of people who ignore the simplest and most universal rules. Grocery shopping around people who don't understand hallway protocols and common courtesy is a major test of ones patience. But I also decided a long time ago that if the common behavior of other people is upsetting you too much, it's probably because you are disappointed in yourself for not achieving an economic or social position which removes you from the common people.

I am as guilty as anyone. Fifteen years ago I went to True Value covered in sweat and dirt. There was a time when I wouldn't have gone out in public like that, and now I don't even think about it. My great grandfathers were farmers who bathed and put on a suit before dinner. We've collectively lost a lot of that.