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Odysseus
05-31-2011, 03:10 PM
Dennis Prager on the squeamishness of those who will not celebrate the triumph of good over evil.
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Dennis Prager
May 31, 2011 12:00 A.M.
Should We Cheer Osama’s Death?

There’s nothing wrong with celebrating when evil men die.

Osama bin Laden — a man whose purpose in life was to inflict death and suffering on as many innocent people as possible — was finally killed, and much of the Western world’s religious — and, of course, secular liberal — elite has expressed moral objections to those who celebrated this death.

Pastor Brian McLaren was named one of Time magazine’s “25 Most Influential Evangelicals in America” in 2005. This is how he reacted to television images of young Americans chanting “USA! USA!” the night bin Laden’s death was announced: “Joyfully celebrating the killing of a killer who joyfully celebrated killing carries an irony that I hope will not be lost on us. Are we learning anything, or simply spinning harder in the cycle of violence?”

CNN reported this reaction by an Episcopal priest, Danielle Tumminio, whose Long Island neighborhood lost scores of people in the 9/11 attacks:


When she saw images of Americans celebrating, “My first reaction was, ‘I wish I was with them,’ ‘My second reaction was, ‘This is disgusting. We shouldn’t be celebrating the death of anybody.’ It felt gross.”

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, reacted to the killing of bin Laden in this way: “I think the killing of an unarmed man is always going to leave a very uncomfortable feeling; it doesn’t look as if justice is seen to be done.”

Likewise many rabbis have objected to celebrating the death of one of history’s great Jew-haters.

In the New Jersey Jewish Standard, Rabbi David-Seth Kirshner, a prominent rabbi in the Conservative (not conservative) denomination of Judaism, eloquently wrote of his gratitude to both Presidents Bush and Obama for the killing of bin Laden, blessed the Navy SEALS, and blessed America. “But,” he then wrote, “even with all of those feelings, I cannot celebrate a death. It does not feel right. It does not feel Jewish. When I saw hundreds of young people chanting and cheering in front of the White House, at Times Square and with Ground Zero in the background last evening before the President addressed the nation, I had a hard time differentiating between us and them.”

Rabbi Steven Wernick, executive vice-president of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, wrote in the Washington Post that “Judaism [finds] the celebration of a person’s death, even if he is guilty of a heinous crime, as immoral.”

Many Reform rabbis have expressed similar sentiments.

On the other hand, nearly all “fundamentalist” Christian and Jewish clergy wrote of the permissibility, even goodness of celebrating bin Laden’s death. As Orthodox Rabbi Tzvi Freeman wrote on the Chabad website Ask the Rabbi,“Someone who is not celebrating at this time is apparently not so concerned by the presence of evil upon our lovely planet.” And as Chuck Colson wrote in the Washington Post, “The death of bin Laden is being rightly celebrated by the Western world, and indeed by Christians.”

The Christian and Jewish clergy who objected to celebration of bin Laden’s death cited the Bible — and in the Jewish instances, the ancient rabbis.

Nearly all cited the Book of Proverbs: “When your enemy falls, do not rejoice, and when he stumbles, let your heart not exult.”

And the rabbis all cited the famous rabbinic legend from the Talmud: “When the Egyptians were drowning in the Sea of Reeds, the angels wanted to sing. But God said to them, ‘The work of my hands is drowning in the sea, and you want to sing?’”

On the other hand, the Book of Proverbs also states, “When the wicked perish, there is joyful song.” And the Talmud also states, “When the wicked perish from the world, good comes to the world.”

So what is one to make of these seemingly contradictory sentiments?

They are not in fact contradictory.

God may chastise angels for singing at the drowning of the Egyptian army. But God does not chastise Moses and the Children of Israel for singing at the Egyptians’ drowning. People are not angels, and they not expected to be.

Second, it is indeed inappropriate to celebrate the fall of one’s personal enemy; it is quite another not to celebrate the fall of evil individuals. Therefore, the two Proverbs citations are not contradictory. One proverb is about personal enemies, the other is about evil individuals. The vast majority of our personal enemies — from a difficult boss to a betraying friend — are not necessarily evil people. Therefore we should not exult at their downfall. And the vast majority of the truly evil are not our personal enemies. Bin Laden was not my personal enemy; he harmed neither me nor anyone I knew. But he was the enemy of all that is good on earth.

It seems to me that if one does not celebrate the death of a truly evil person, one is not celebrating the triumph of good over evil. I do not see how one can honestly say, “I celebrate that bin Laden can no longer murder men, women, and children, but I do not celebrate his death.”

The British historian Andrew Roberts, whose history of World War II was published last week, has summed up the situation well:


My countrymen’s reactions to the death of Osama bin Laden have made me doubt my pride in being British. The foul outpouring of sneering anti-Americanism, legalistic quibbling, and concern for the supposed human rights of our modern Hitler have left me squirming in embarrassment and apology before my American friends. . . . Britons utterly refuse to obey the natural instincts of the free-born to celebrate the death of a tyrant. . . . When the Mets-Phillies baseball game erupted into cheers on hearing the wonderful news, or the crowds chanted “USA! USA!” outside the White House, they were manifesting the finest emotional responses of a great people.
As I believe there is an afterlife, I believe that those rabbis and others who think it immoral or un-Jewish or un-Christian to celebrate bin Laden’s death may one day have to confront a Jew named Arie Hassenberg, a prisoner at Auschwitz-Birkenau. After one of the Auschwitz sub-camps, Monowitz, was bombed by the Allies, Hassenberg’s reaction (as quoted by Holocaust historian Saul Friedlander) was: “To see a killed German; that was why we enjoyed the bombing.”

Was Hassenberg’s reaction morally wrong or “un-Jewish” — or “un-Christian”? I don’t think so.

Celebrating the death of bin Laden is not only moral. It is a religious and moral imperative.

— Dennis Prager is a nationally syndicated radio talk-show host and columnist. He may be contacted through his website,dennisprager.com.

linda22003
05-31-2011, 03:14 PM
Since Hitler, we've gotten out of the habit of seeing Good vs. Evil, but sometimes it still applies.
As Moms Mabley said, "We should only speak good of the dead. He's dead. Good." ;)

noonwitch
05-31-2011, 03:17 PM
It's a relief he's dead. I'm otherwise of the McLaren take on it, I don't feel the need to celebrate. I also didn't lose any loved ones on 9-11, so I'm not going to judge the people who did lose loved ones and celebrated bin Laden's death.

CueSi
05-31-2011, 03:18 PM
Since Hitler, we've gotten out of the habit of seeing Good vs. Evil, but sometimes it still applies.
As Moms Mabley said, "We should only speak good of the dead. He's dead. Good." ;)

It made me giggle. :D

~QC

Rcd
05-31-2011, 03:21 PM
Ron Paul wanted his ass brought back to stand trial. I find comfort in knowing that the last image he saw in his life was that of a member of the USN. Yeah, I cheered.

Odysseus
05-31-2011, 04:21 PM
I wanted his body to be stuffed with pork, embalmed, and put on permanent display in the Smithsonian.

Arroyo_Doble
05-31-2011, 04:33 PM
Christianity is a difficult religion. Christ demands a great deal from His followers.

Odysseus
05-31-2011, 04:43 PM
Christianity is a difficult religion. Christ demands a great deal from His followers.

I wouldn't know. I'm Jewish. But, is there a point to your blather?

Arroyo_Doble
05-31-2011, 04:45 PM
I wouldn't know. I'm Jewish. But, is there a point to your blather?

Yes. But being Jewish, you probably didn't see it.

Rcd
05-31-2011, 05:01 PM
I wouldn't know. I'm Jewish. But, is there a point to your blather?

Has there ever been a point to his seemingly aimles ramblings.

Odysseus
05-31-2011, 05:15 PM
Yes. But being Jewish, you probably didn't see it.
Then why don't you explain it to me? Since you've apparently become an authority on Christianity, you can enlighten me as to your point.

Has there ever been a point to his seemingly aimles ramblings.
Yes, the same point that Vidkun Quisling made when he sold out Norway to the Germans.

noonwitch
05-31-2011, 05:47 PM
I wouldn't know. I'm Jewish. But, is there 'a point to your blather?


It could be the whole radical forgiveness thing preached by Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount. I think that's what McClaren was getting at.


Most of the christians here don't consider Brian McClaren or Rowan Williamson to be true christians. The former is probably the first leader of what is now called emergent christianity, and Rowan Williamson is pro gay rights and other things that make traditional christians uncomfortable.

fettpett
05-31-2011, 06:56 PM
Then why don't you explain it to me? Since you've apparently become an authority on Christianity, you can enlighten me as to your point.


him, wiiiiiillllburr and nova all seem to be

Odysseus
05-31-2011, 06:58 PM
It could be the whole radical forgiveness thing preached by Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount. I think that's what McClaren was getting at.

Most of the christians here don't consider Brian McClaren or Rowan Williamson to be true christians. The former is probably the first leader of what is now called emergent christianity, and Rowan Williamson is pro gay rights and other things that make traditional christians uncomfortable.

Okay... So Christians are supposed to love Bin Laden. This is why I'm strictly Old Testament.

FlaGator
05-31-2011, 07:49 PM
Then why don't you explain it to me? Since you've apparently become an authority on Christianity, you can enlighten me as to your point.


Here is an Old Testament Proverb that is applicable to Jews as well as Christians.

Do not rejoice when your enemy falls, and let not your heart be glad when he stumbles, lest the LORD see it and be displeased, and turn away his anger from him.

Proverbs 24:17-18

Phillygirl
05-31-2011, 07:51 PM
Here is an Old Testament Proverb that is applicable to Jews as well as Christians.

Do not rejoice when your enemy falls, and let not your heart be glad when he stumbles, lest the LORD see it and be displeased, and turn away his anger from him.

Proverbs 24:17-18

Yeah, God and Christ expect a lot from us. I presume the Holy Spirit does as well.

FlaGator
05-31-2011, 07:54 PM
Yeah, God and Christ expect a lot from us. I presume the Holy Spirit does as well.

Being a person of faith is certainly hard sometimes. God expects us to act in ways that run contrary to our fallen nature.

hampshirebrit
05-31-2011, 07:56 PM
Fuck yeah. We should cheer it. Who in their right mind wouldn't cheer it?

I'd dance on his grave, but they dumped his sorry ass at sea.

FlaGator
05-31-2011, 07:58 PM
Fuck yeah. We should cheer it. Who in their right mind wouldn't cheer it?

I'd dance on his grave, but they dumped his sorry ass at sea.

Then you have more in common with Muslims than you do with decent people.

Odysseus
05-31-2011, 07:58 PM
Here is an Old Testament Proverb that is applicable to Jews as well as Christians.

Do not rejoice when your enemy falls, and let not your heart be glad when he stumbles, lest the LORD see it and be displeased, and turn away his anger from him.

Proverbs 24:17-18

Prager addresses this point in his column:


Nearly all cited the Book of Proverbs: “When your enemy falls, do not rejoice, and when he stumbles, let your heart not exult.”

And the rabbis all cited the famous rabbinic legend from the Talmud: “When the Egyptians were drowning in the Sea of Reeds, the angels wanted to sing. But God said to them, ‘The work of my hands is drowning in the sea, and you want to sing?’”

On the other hand, the Book of Proverbs also states, “When the wicked perish, there is joyful song.” And the Talmud also states, “When the wicked perish from the world, good comes to the world.”

So what is one to make of these seemingly contradictory sentiments?

They are not in fact contradictory.

God may chastise angels for singing at the drowning of the Egyptian army. But God does not chastise Moses and the Children of Israel for singing at the Egyptians’ drowning. People are not angels, and they not expected to be.

Second, it is indeed inappropriate to celebrate the fall of one’s personal enemy; it is quite another not to celebrate the fall of evil individuals. Therefore, the two Proverbs citations are not contradictory. One proverb is about personal enemies, the other is about evil individuals. The vast majority of our personal enemies — from a difficult boss to a betraying friend — are not necessarily evil people. Therefore we should not exult at their downfall. And the vast majority of the truly evil are not our personal enemies. Bin Laden was not my personal enemy; he harmed neither me nor anyone I knew. But he was the enemy of all that is good on earth.

Rcd
05-31-2011, 08:01 PM
Then you have more in common with Muslims than you do with decent people.

Judge not lest ye be judged, jackwagon.

FlaGator
05-31-2011, 08:03 PM
Judge not lest ye be judged, jackwagon.
You should really understand that before you quote it.

Bailey
05-31-2011, 08:04 PM
I'll only sing when the whole misbegotten religion is stamped out along with their followers.

FlaGator
05-31-2011, 08:07 PM
Prager addresses this point in his column:

Nearly all cited the Book of Proverbs: “When your enemy falls, do not rejoice, and when he stumbles, let your heart not exult.”

And the rabbis all cited the famous rabbinic legend from the Talmud: “When the Egyptians were drowning in the Sea of Reeds, the angels wanted to sing. But God said to them, ‘The work of my hands is drowning in the sea, and you want to sing?’”

On the other hand, the Book of Proverbs also states, “When the wicked perish, there is joyful song.” And the Talmud also states, “When the wicked perish from the world, good comes to the world.”

So what is one to make of these seemingly contradictory sentiments?

They are not in fact contradictory.

God may chastise angels for singing at the drowning of the Egyptian army. But God does not chastise Moses and the Children of Israel for singing at the Egyptians’ drowning. People are not angels, and they not expected to be.

Second, it is indeed inappropriate to celebrate the fall of one’s personal enemy; it is quite another not to celebrate the fall of evil individuals. Therefore, the two Proverbs citations are not contradictory. One proverb is about personal enemies, the other is about evil individuals. The vast majority of our personal enemies — from a difficult boss to a betraying friend — are not necessarily evil people. Therefore we should not exult at their downfall. And the vast majority of the truly evil are not our personal enemies. Bin Laden was not my personal enemy; he harmed neither me nor anyone I knew. But he was the enemy of all that is good on earth.

I don't believe that they were singing so much at the drowning of the Egypts as they were for God saving them. The interpretation that Prager is using is one of many. I tend to side with the one that best fits in with the entire context of Scripture. Based on Christ's teaching I believe that the interpretation that I am using is the safest.

hampshirebrit
05-31-2011, 08:07 PM
Then you have more in common with Muslims than you do with decent people.

Bollocks. You're talking thru your ass, G.

FlaGator
05-31-2011, 08:08 PM
I'll only sing when the whole misbegotten religion is stamped out along with their followers.

God will stamp them out when they have served His purpose, whatever that may be.

Rcd
05-31-2011, 08:08 PM
You should really understand that before you quote it.

As should you.

FlaGator
05-31-2011, 08:13 PM
Bollocks. You're talking thru your ass, G.

How do you figure? You just described behaving in a manner similar to the behavior of the Muslims and implied that you would enjoy it.

What I happy that Bin Laden was killed? Yes. Did it inspire me to dance in the streets? No. I reserve that for more important things. Besides, your an atheist so what does it matter? He has returned to the nothingness from wince he came.

hampshirebrit
05-31-2011, 08:14 PM
God will stamp them out when they have served His purpose, whatever that may be.

LOL. :D:D

Wait a sec ... you really think that, don't you.

FlaGator
05-31-2011, 08:15 PM
As should you.

Being a minister, I think that I do. At least I've studied it quite a bit. What do you feel it means?

FlaGator
05-31-2011, 08:16 PM
LOL. :D:D

Wait a sec ... you really think that, don't you.

Yes, much like he used the Babylonians and the Asyrians and all the others He has used through out history. Even Hitler served some purpose. Just because I don't necessarily see it doesn't mean that it doesn't exist.

hampshirebrit
05-31-2011, 08:18 PM
How do you figure? You just described behaving in a manner similar to the behavior of the Muslims and implied that you would enjoy it.

What I happy that Bin Laden was killed? Yes. Did it inspire me to dance in the streets? No. I reserve that for more important things. Besides, your an atheist so what does it matter? He has returned to the nothingness from wince he came.

I think you meant whence, but wince will do fine.

Listen, that sonofabitch has hurt a lot of good people.

I will dance on his grave if I feel like it, and I will enjoy it.

Don't get all holy-roller on me, that won't work.

FlaGator
05-31-2011, 08:24 PM
I think you meant whence, but wince will do fine.

Listen, that sonofabitch has hurt a lot of good people.

I will dance on his grave if I feel like it, and I will enjoy it.

Don't get all holy-roller on me, that won't work.

I didn't get holler than thou on you, I just stated my belief as you did yours. I agree he hurt a lot of good people, does you dance bring them back? Does it bring closure for those who lost loved ones on his orders? To say that it makes you feel better is fine and I under stand that but to associate it with those who have losses that are up close and personal is another matter all together.

FlaGator
05-31-2011, 08:25 PM
I think you meant whence, but wince will do fine.

Listen, that sonofabitch has hurt a lot of good people.

I will dance on his grave if I feel like it, and I will enjoy it.

Don't get all holy-roller on me, that won't work.

Thank you for the correction. I can't even say that it was a typo. Just sloppy.

Also my use of the word decent was wrong. Sorry another bad choice on my part.

Speedy
05-31-2011, 10:41 PM
I celebrate it! I am glad the piece of shit follower of that goat fucking, pedophile and general all around pig fart, Muhammed is dead. Pigs be upon both of them! And the words of no one will coerce me into feeling any different. I am so fucking glad that Osama is no longer around breathing the oxygen that could be put to better use by someone else.

CaughtintheMiddle1990
05-31-2011, 11:25 PM
George Washington's Rules for Civility:

22d Shew not yourself glad at the Misfortune of another though he were your enemy.

23d When you see a Crime punished, you may be inwardly Pleased; but always shew Pity to the Suffering Offender.

noonwitch
06-01-2011, 10:07 AM
Okay... So Christians are supposed to love Bin Laden. This is why I'm strictly Old Testament.

It doesn't mean love in a gushy, huggy, touchy-feely kind of way.

Christians believe that Jesus died to reconcile mankind with God, because our sins have made it impossible to do so any other way. Part of that belief is that we are all in the same boat, whether we are Mother Theresa or Osama bin Laden. We are sinners in need of forgiveness.


Jesus taught to forgive other's sins-it makes sense not just from a spiritual point of view, but from a psychological point of view. To hold grudges keeps people from becoming all they were meant to be.

wilbur
06-01-2011, 11:05 AM
Psychology is complex. Very complex. While science certainly hasn't unraveled all (or even that much) of it...

Bronze-age nomads sure-as-shit didn't know much about it, and have absolutely nothing informative to say about how you should feel after the death of Osama Bin Laden, and what strategies might increase your own well-being, and the well-being of society in the long term in dealing both with his death, or his previously intact life and its affect on us all.

So good grief Prager, just stop it.

Its probably pretty healthy to feel relief, happiness, a renewed senses of security, and the like after OBL's death... and perhaps some trepidation, and sadness. Just don't get carried away with it.

It may even be healthy to forgive.

Rcd
06-01-2011, 12:32 PM
Psychology is complex. Very complex. While science certainly hasn't unraveled all (or even that much) of it...

Bronze-age nomads sure-as-shit didn't know much about it, and have absolutely nothing informative to say about how you should feel after the death of Osama Bin Laden, and what strategies might increase your own well-being, and the well-being of society in the long term in dealing both with his death, or his previously intact life and its affect on us all.

So good grief Prager, just stop it.

Its probably pretty healthy to feel relief, happiness, a renewed senses of security, and the like after OBL's death... and perhaps some trepidation, and sadness. Just don't get carried away with it.

It may even be healthy to forgive.

Forgive the deaths of 3000 innocent non-combatants? You're asking a helluva lot from some people, namely friends and families of the victims. Perhaps you can, and maybe already have, but consider that it is doubtful that bin ladens work is done.

wilbur
06-01-2011, 02:28 PM
Forgive the deaths of 3000 innocent non-combatants? You're asking a helluva lot from some people, namely friends and families of the victims. Perhaps you can, and maybe already have, but consider that it is doubtful that bin ladens work is done.

I'm not asking anyone to forgive anybody.

I see people on either side of this debate saying, 'its obviously great and good for everyone to celebrate, throw parties, etc', and 'the other side saying - no its obviously bad, immoral etc'. I'm pretty much just saying the right way to be isnt so obvious... and caution is probably a good thing, when answers arent so obvious.

Odysseus
06-01-2011, 06:36 PM
I don't believe that they were singing so much at the drowning of the Egypts as they were for God saving them. The interpretation that Prager is using is one of many. I tend to side with the one that best fits in with the entire context of Scripture. Based on Christ's teaching I believe that the interpretation that I am using is the safest.
Based on Christ's teaching, it may be the safest interpretation, but I'm not a Christian. The Old Testament has a number of references to rejoicing over the destruction of evil. The Book of Esther and the celebration of Purim are not just about the deliverance from evil, but about the punishment of the wicked, specifically Haman, whose name is always drowned out with noisemakers and other party favors during the Purim services.

George Washington's Rules for Civility:

22d Shew not yourself glad at the Misfortune of another though he were your enemy.

23d When you see a Crime punished, you may be inwardly Pleased; but always shew Pity to the Suffering Offender.

You are forgetting that he also wrote:

62d Speak not of doleful Things in a Time of Mirth or at the Table; Speak not of Melancholy Things as Death and Wounds, and if others Mention them Change if you can the Discourse tell not your Dreams, but to your intimate Friend.
Bin Laden's death is a time for mirth among his victims' survivors.

It doesn't mean love in a gushy, huggy, touchy-feely kind of way.

Christians believe that Jesus died to reconcile mankind with God, because our sins have made it impossible to do so any other way. Part of that belief is that we are all in the same boat, whether we are Mother Theresa or Osama bin Laden. We are sinners in need of forgiveness.

Jesus taught to forgive other's sins-it makes sense not just from a spiritual point of view, but from a psychological point of view. To hold grudges keeps people from becoming all they were meant to be.
I didn't mean it that way, either. But I think that there is a difference between those who sin while striving for virtue (and therefore fall short of their ideals) and those whose ideals are inherently evil. A person who didn't cheer at the death of Hitler, for example, would make me wonder about their worldview.

Psychology is complex. Very complex. While science certainly hasn't unraveled all (or even that much) of it...

Bronze-age nomads sure-as-shit didn't know much about it, and have absolutely nothing informative to say about how you should feel after the death of Osama Bin Laden, and what strategies might increase your own well-being, and the well-being of society in the long term in dealing both with his death, or his previously intact life and its affect on us all.

So good grief Prager, just stop it.

Its probably pretty healthy to feel relief, happiness, a renewed senses of security, and the like after OBL's death... and perhaps some trepidation, and sadness. Just don't get carried away with it.

It may even be healthy to forgive.
It's also easy to forgive, when you're not the victim. If you had lost someone because of Bin Laden, for example, or because of his followers, you might find forgiving him a bit less easy. If you had missed a year of your first child's life because you had to go halfway around the world to defeat his minions, or if you had seen friends wounded or maimed, perhaps you might be less inclined to forgive him. Prager got it right, and the fact that you disagree is even more proof of that.

I'm not asking anyone to forgive anybody.

I see people on either side of this debate saying, 'its obviously great and good for everyone to celebrate, throw parties, etc', and 'the other side saying - no its obviously bad, immoral etc'. I'm pretty much just saying the right way to be isnt so obvious... and caution is probably a good thing, when answers arent so obvious.
What's not obvious? A mass murderer who sought to destroy our civilization is dead at the hands of our military. The elimination of a hateful monster is a cause for celebration.

wilbur
06-02-2011, 01:00 AM
It's also easy to forgive, when you're not the victim. If you had lost someone because of Bin Laden, for example, or because of his followers, you might find forgiving him a bit less easy. If you had missed a year of your first child's life because you had to go halfway around the world to defeat his minions, or if you had seen friends wounded or maimed, perhaps you might be less inclined to forgive him. Prager got it right, and the fact that you disagree is even more proof of that.

What's not obvious? A mass murderer who sought to destroy our civilization is dead at the hands of our military. The elimination of a hateful monster is a cause for celebration.

Or perhaps somber reflection, or grieving for those lost, or just plain moving on, or forgiveness, or any or possibly all of the above.

What will help heal, and what will hurt more (both society and the individual)? Those are the important questions. The answers arent obvious. And I'm not alone in questioning these things, given the multitudes of responses similar to mine (many from right-wing Christians) to the euphoria and celebration following OBL's death.

Perhaps we're on the right track, perhaps we arent.

Rockntractor
06-02-2011, 01:36 AM
They should have dried him like a mummy and sold souvenirs!

Arroyo_Doble
06-02-2011, 10:51 AM
They should have dried him like a mummy and sold souvenirs!

Like the Ferengi?

fettpett
06-02-2011, 12:38 PM
Like the Ferengi?

I don't care who you are, thats funny right there :D ;)

Odysseus
06-02-2011, 12:45 PM
Or perhaps somber reflection, or grieving for those lost, or just plain moving on, or forgiveness, or any or possibly all of the above.

What will help heal, and what will hurt more (both society and the individual)? Those are the important questions. The answers arent obvious. And I'm not alone in questioning these things, given the multitudes of responses similar to mine (many from right-wing Christians) to the euphoria and celebration following OBL's death.

Perhaps we're on the right track, perhaps we arent.
The best way to heal is to win this war. The best way to hurt is to lose it. The rest is just equivocation.

Like the Ferengi?

But with better teeth.