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megimoo
06-02-2011, 10:46 PM
MTA Officers Detain Man For Taking Pictures

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The Maryland Transit Administration says more training may be called for after three MTA officers detained a man for taking pictures at a light rail station.
SNIP
According to the ACLU, this isn’t the first time MTA Police have overstepped their bounds........
In a YouTube posting, Christopher Fussell left the camera rolling when he was confronted by three MTA officers for taking pictures at the Baltimore Cultural Light Rail Station.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_iMr76atjUA&feature=youtu.be

“It is my understanding that I am free to take pictures as long as it’s not for commercial purposes but for personal use,” Fussell said in the video......“Not on state property, not without proper authorization,” an officer said.....Fussell: “From who?”
Officer: “Nobody’s allowed to take pictures.”..The MTA admits the officers were in error.

“They can most certainly take photos of our system,” Ralign Wells, the MTA Administrator, said.
In addition to being wrong about MTA and state policy, the officer incorrectly cites the Patriot Act.

http://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2011/06/01/mta-officers-detain-man-for-taking-pictures/

Novaheart
06-02-2011, 10:59 PM
The punishment for the officers should be that on unpaid time, they have to walk through the MTA station wearing signs that reads, "I am sorry. I unlawfully detained and annoyed a US citizen because I was ignorant of the law and my duties." In addition , they should have to take a constitutional law class on their own time and own dime, and pass it with a B or better.

pyackog
06-03-2011, 12:01 AM
The punishment for the officers should be that on unpaid time, they have to walk through the MTA station wearing signs that reads, "I am sorry. I unlawfully detained and annoyed a US citizen because I was ignorant of the law and my duties." In addition , they should have to take a constitutional law class on their own time and own dime, and pass it with a B or better.

Agreed. Although I think the man who was detained illegally should also be allowed to kick them in the nuts. :D

Phillygirl
06-03-2011, 12:04 AM
What am I missing? The police made a mistake. It happens. But I don't necessarily think it's a bad thing to investigate when someone is taking pictures of mass transportation.

Novaheart
06-03-2011, 11:52 AM
What am I missing? The police made a mistake. It happens. But I don't necessarily think it's a bad thing to investigate when someone is taking pictures of mass transportation.

I think it's a pattern of ignorance or indifference where there is a common perception that constitutional rights are a hindrance to law enforcement rather than a check on government abuse.

Look at the case in Philadelphia with open carry. Not only will the police not admit that they were and are wrong, they have said that they intend to continue to force law abiding citizens to lay on the ground like crack dealers , when the law abiding citizen has done nothing wrong.

The notion that the police are entitled to your time to satisfy their idle curiosity is offensive to me. I don't have animosity towards the police, I don't have animosity towards a waiter either, but when either one is intrusive or demanding, then I have a problem.

noonwitch
06-03-2011, 12:49 PM
What am I missing? The police made a mistake. It happens. But I don't necessarily think it's a bad thing to investigate when someone is taking pictures of mass transportation.


That's what I was thinking. There are obviously innocent pictures-someone taking pictures of friends or something. I can see why the police would be suspicious about someone alone taking pictures of the trains. It's enough to merit asking some questions.

pyackog
06-03-2011, 01:51 PM
What am I missing? The police made a mistake. It happens. But I don't necessarily think it's a bad thing to investigate when someone is taking pictures of mass transportation.

Yeah but their mistakes come with a higher cost to us because of the power they hold over us. Besides, they didn't investigage, they merely told him to stop.

Phillygirl
06-03-2011, 01:56 PM
Yeah but their mistakes come with a higher cost to us because of the power they hold over us. Besides, they didn't investigage, they merely told him to stop.

Well, that was definitely the mistake aspect of it, and training is a solution to that. I just don't really view it as a huge constitutional infringement. I can recall a few years ago being at a mall near my house which is fairly large and seeing security tell a man that was taking a lot of detailed pictures of the inside of the mall to stop. As I recall, it was closer in time to 9/11 and I felt like security was taking that stance due to those types of security threats, but I didn't have a whole lot to base that opinion on, other than the appearance of the photographer. I remember thinking that since it was a privately owned business the security officer was within his rights to demand that he stop.

SaintLouieWoman
06-03-2011, 10:09 PM
That's what I was thinking. There are obviously innocent pictures-someone taking pictures of friends or something. I can see why the police would be suspicious about someone alone taking pictures of the trains. It's enough to merit asking some questions.
Agreed. I doubt if there's much reason to photograph tracks in mass transit. Since the info gleaned from UBL's hideout, it seems that the transit person was doing his job. What would be said if the facilities were blown up, with God only knows how many people on the train?They should cut those workers some slack.

Kay
06-04-2011, 11:23 AM
What am I missing? The police made a mistake. It happens. But I don't necessarily think it's a bad thing to investigate when someone is taking pictures of mass transportation.

I think if the guy taking the pictures was of middle eastern decent,
then they should have detained him and sent him off to Gitmo for
further questioning.

If he was not of ME decent, then they over stepped.