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NJCardFan
06-08-2011, 04:12 PM
I'm watching a show on History Channel about the Dust Bowl disaster of the early 1930's in the midwest. This was just one aspect of the Great Depression but damn. The next time anyone compares what's going on now to what was going on then, slap them. We're living like kings compared to those people. But I recommend watching this. It's a few years old but it puts things in perspective. http://www.history.com/videos/black-blizzard#black-blizzard

noonwitch
06-08-2011, 04:39 PM
Good point. People were hungry during that time, because there was a food shortage. That's very different from these hard times.

HBO had a really weird show a few years back that was set in that time and place, called Carnivale. It didn't do really well in the ratings, but I liked it. If nothing else, it did a pretty good job of recreating that situation for the camera.

fettpett
06-08-2011, 04:52 PM
yeah, I watched some of it today, very interesting, particularly the parts about how we've expanded on the idea of cloud seeding

Constitutionally Speaking
06-08-2011, 08:11 PM
My dad tells stories about my great grandmother and a family gathering - an all day affair with both lunch and dinner served.

Lunch went fine but at dinner everyone commented at how horrible the salad dressing was - the same salad dressing that was just fine at lunch.

My great grandma, not wanting to waste a thing, had mixed the leftover pickle juice into the salad dressing.

Gingersnap
06-08-2011, 09:51 PM
The human cost during those times was unbelievable compared to what people are facing today. Whole families were uprooted to find work and everybody worked - little kids included.

It makes this financial disaster look pretty lame.

NJCardFan
06-08-2011, 11:01 PM
The human cost during those times was unbelievable compared to what people are facing today. Whole families were uprooted to find work and everybody worked - little kids included.

It makes this financial disaster look pretty lame.

You have people complaining about eating Ramen noodles and mayonnaise sandwiches but what you don't have is people eating ketchup soup. People today don't know how good they have it.

Gingersnap
06-08-2011, 11:05 PM
You have people complaining about eating Ramen noodles and mayonnaise sandwiches but what you don't have is people eating ketchup soup. People today don't know how good they have it.

And the people doing the complaining didn't work for 12 hours picking peaches to afford that ramen, either. Most of them sat on the couch all day long playing games or watching TV. Big difference.

Novaheart
06-09-2011, 12:16 AM
The human cost during those times was unbelievable compared to what people are facing today. Whole families were uprooted to find work and everybody worked - little kids included.

It makes this financial disaster look pretty lame.

Times are completely different now, and conditions varied by region during the Great Depression as well. We have safety nets to help ensure that children have food, and basic medical needs are met (even though they often initiate bankruptcy even for people who have never had credit).

When the GD hit my hometown, few people had mortgages, many had no utility bills, and your average person hadn't recently bought as much house as he could afford. There was still plenty of space for small gardens, people were still connected to farming, and most of the goods and services we rely on now didn't exist or were luxuries. There are people who will tell you, "The Depression never came here." while others like my mother will assure you that that is because it never left.

noonwitch
06-09-2011, 09:36 AM
Times are completely different now, and conditions varied by region during the Great Depression as well. We have safety nets to help ensure that children have food, and basic medical needs are met (even though they often initiate bankruptcy even for people who have never had credit).

When the GD hit my hometown, few people had mortgages, many had no utility bills, and your average person hadn't recently bought as much house as he could afford. There was still plenty of space for small gardens, people were still connected to farming, and most of the goods and services we rely on now didn't exist or were luxuries. There are people who will tell you, "The Depression never came here." while others like my mother will assure you that that is because it never left.



Detroit was still booming during the Great Depression. Michigan's farmland, which was more extensive then, was not affected by the dust storms and was still fertile. My grandpa said times were hard for a lot of people, but he was young and healthy and able to work two jobs to support his family. But as a little kid, he starved on the eastern front during WWI, so his perspective was different than most americans.

Even the poor in Detroit at the time had food, electricity and running water.

djones520
06-09-2011, 09:56 AM
But as a little kid, he starved on the eastern front during WWI, so his perspective was different than most americans.



A prime example of the idea that no matter how bad you have it, there is always someone whose had it worse.

AmPat
06-09-2011, 11:03 AM
All good points. Don't forget that back then more people were agrarian based than now. We have 95% of the population that could not farm or hunt for anything to sustain their families. Back then, people were more self sufficient than now.

Today, we would be killing one another to take what our neighbors have. We don't hunt, fish, or farm. We gave that up for 7-eleven and Food Lion. I doubt inner city Gangtas will take canning classes.

Most of our large metro areas are loaded with dependant citizens. Shut down trucking and our stores would be empty in hours. Destroy our economy and we have no way of sustaining those heavily DIMoRAT metro areas. Liberals would starve in the millions.:cool:

Novaheart
06-09-2011, 03:26 PM
Detroit was still booming during the Great Depression. Michigan's farmland, which was more extensive then, was not affected by the dust storms and was still fertile. My grandpa said times were hard for a lot of people, but he was young and healthy and able to work two jobs to support his family. But as a little kid, he starved on the eastern front during WWI, so his perspective was different than most americans.

Even the poor in Detroit at the time had food, electricity and running water.

I often feel like my experience is rare amongst people my age (50ish). When I was a child, everyone in the city limits (as far as I know) had indoor plumbing, though not all of them had city water. Some had wells. My grandmother's house still had a hand pump on the back porch which had previously been used to fill a ringer washer or rotated to pump water to the kitchen sink through a window. While she had plumbing upstairs and down, she still had a floor furnace which heated the house through gravity vents. My other grandmother's house had a monster coal furnace in the basement providing central heat to multiple rooms.

Not too far outside of town you have people who had bulbs hanging from ceilings, and still had outhouses either as a primary or secondary sanitary facility. A little farther out than that , sharecroppers lived in houses with no utilities.

Even though I was born mid century, I feel like my childhood bridged the turn of the century.