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View Full Version : Sweet Tea Brown Loses it Over Cold Pancakes



megimoo
06-19-2011, 10:19 PM
An inmate who fought with jail guards about a plate of undercooked pancakes has drawn a term of more than five years in prison. The incident took place four months before he would have been released from the Calhoun County jail on a previous offense.

The pancake incident resulted in three new charges being filed. Talris Terrell “Sweet Tea” Brown, 43, eventually entered a no contest plea to the new charges of aggravated assault, resisting an officer with violence, and the introduction of contraband into the Calhoun County jail. The contraband charge was leveled because Brown armed himself with a broken mop handle in his fight with the guards. Sentencing occurred Wednesday.

According to a press release from the State Attorney’s office, Calhoun County Deputy Gary McGee was called to the jail early one morning in January to deal with Brown. When McGee got there, he found Brown holding each end of the mop handle in his hands and facing off with the guard in his cell. When McGee asked him what the problem was, Brown said his pancakes were not properly cooked that morning.

McGee told him to put the mop handle down, but Brown said, “Bring all you can. You will have to kill me,” according to the press release.

McGee pointed his Taser at Brown and ordered him again to drop the handle but Brown swung at him, instead. MGee then Tased Brown in the chest. Brown dropped to the cell floor and officers got the broken handle away from him. Brown continued to struggle, however, and McGee Tasered him again. This allowed officers to get Brown under control and he was then moved to isolation.

http://www2.jcfloridan.com/news/2011/jun/17/cold-pancakes-lead-five-year-sentence-ar-1985764/

NJCardFan
06-20-2011, 06:28 AM
Wow, they have tazers in that jail? Anyhoo, just goes to show you that prison inmates are just a tad above infants. Cold pancakes? Next time don't go to jail.

djones520
06-20-2011, 06:34 AM
Wow, they have tazers in that jail? Anyhoo, just goes to show you that prison inmates are just a tad above infants. Cold pancakes? Next time don't go to jail.

I often sit here and wonder how they can justify acting the way they do, but when you think about how stress in your life can lead to some behavior changes that you don't normally exhibit, it becomes a bit more apparent how this happens.

Still doesn't justify actions like this though. I wonder how "indoctrinated" he is in the system, and if this wasn't an attempt to spend more time there. At just four months to go, you'd think they'd be doing everything that can to try not to extend that time.

NJCardFan
06-20-2011, 06:40 AM
I often sit here and wonder how they can justify acting the way they do, but when you think about how stress in your life can lead to some behavior changes that you don't normally exhibit, it becomes a bit more apparent how this happens.

Still doesn't justify actions like this though. I wonder how "indoctrinated" he is in the system, and if this wasn't an attempt to spend more time there. At just four months to go, you'd think they'd be doing everything that can to try not to extend that time.

I had an inmate on my housing unit once who was 4 days from going home on parole. Then he decided to attack his cellmate with a lock in a sock. Sometimes they just don't want to go home. Oh, and don't get me started on the one's who go home and end up coming back a few months later.

Novaheart
06-20-2011, 11:25 AM
I often sit here and wonder how they can justify acting the way they do, but when you think about how stress in your life can lead to some behavior changes that you don't normally exhibit, it becomes a bit more apparent how this happens.

Still doesn't justify actions like this though. I wonder how "indoctrinated" he is in the system, and if this wasn't an attempt to spend more time there. At just four months to go, you'd think they'd be doing everything that can to try not to extend that time.

I watch Lock Up, and over the episodes it has become clear that prison is made miserable for the majority by the minority. By housing different levels of criminals together, they seem to be making it worse overall. I have to assume there is logic to it, but one still imagines that if the prisoners were sorted and segregated better, that there might be five relative quiet and monastic prisons to the one loud, obnoxious, and continually problematic one.

Novaheart
06-20-2011, 11:30 AM
I had an inmate on my housing unit once who was 4 days from going home on parole. Then he decided to attack his cellmate with a lock in a sock. Sometimes they just don't want to go home. Oh, and don't get me started on the one's who go home and end up coming back a few months later.

Have you ever watched the Lock Up episode in Eastern Europe? It really seems like the entire experience is quite different. Of course, the dynamics are different. In a monocultural society you don't have an entire group of people being told and believing that the real reason they are in prison is because of who they are rather than what they have done. You also have relatively few lifers in the European prison.

I think we may be shooting ourselves in the foot with the severity of sentencing in this country. If these people have little hope of ever getting out, or getting out before they are in a young person's mind the walking dead, then what reason do they really have for behaving themselves?

NJCardFan
06-20-2011, 05:26 PM
Have you ever watched the Lock Up episode in Eastern Europe? It really seems like the entire experience is quite different. Of course, the dynamics are different. In a monocultural society you don't have an entire group of people being told and believing that the real reason they are in prison is because of who they are rather than what they have done. You also have relatively few lifers in the European prison.

I think we may be shooting ourselves in the foot with the severity of sentencing in this country. If these people have little hope of ever getting out, or getting out before they are in a young person's mind the walking dead, then what reason do they really have for behaving themselves?

You're actually on the right track. Worse yet, some sentences aren't equal to other crimes. For instance, at least in NJ, I've seen loner sentences involving drugs than child molestation. As for segregating the population, easier said than done. The only group we segregate from the rest of GP is special needs. However, we try to separate the more violent criminals and they use a point system for that. If you're a violent inmate in for violent crime, you more than likely end up in Trenton or Rahway. Inmates actually have to earn their way to my jail or other jails like it.

Novaheart
06-21-2011, 11:47 AM
You're actually on the right track. Worse yet, some sentences aren't equal to other crimes. For instance, at least in NJ, I've seen loner sentences involving drugs than child molestation. As for segregating the population, easier said than done. The only group we segregate from the rest of GP is special needs. However, we try to separate the more violent criminals and they use a point system for that. If you're a violent inmate in for violent crime, you more than likely end up in Trenton or Rahway. Inmates actually have to earn their way to my jail or other jails like it.

I peruse the arrest reports for Pinellas County frequently. I also have something of a photographic memory, so I notice when I see repeat offenders. Several times, I have placed the mugshots of repeat offenders in a row to see the progression. I have seen middle class young men (usually arrested for simple possession, open container, house party, racing, admin violations, or DUI) go through a remarkable change over as few as three visits to jail. They don't even have to go to prison for this to happen, but prison has its effect for sure.

What I see is the transformation from the surprised or arrogant young man, into a criminal. There is a physical change in their appearance, their expression, the look in their eyes. If you go to six arrests you also see new tattoos and other "thug" and "gansta" bullshit.

I know that parenting is a huge part of this. I know that the schools are messed up. I know that some people make bad choices. And still, I can't help but think that something can be done once the process has started. We could send these kids to military academies or residential trade schools (as we used to do) for less than it costs to keep them in the revolving door of police, justice, correction and probation services. We're watching a critical ten years of their lives slip away when they start at 17 and gat arrested multiple times over the years.

Instead, I see a young man whose first mugshot has real tears in his eyes and his last one has a tattooed tear beneath a cold stare.