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The Night Owl
06-30-2011, 12:48 PM
Submitted without comment...


Storm Warnings: Extreme Weather Is a Product of Climate Change
More violent and frequent storms, once merely a prediction of climate models, are now a matter of observation. Part 1 of a three-part series

By John Carey | June 28, 2011

In North Dakota the waters kept rising. Swollen by more than a month of record rains in Saskatchewan, the Souris River topped its all time record high, set back in 1881. The floodwaters poured into Minot, North Dakota's fourth-largest city, and spread across thousands of acres of farms and forests. More than 12,000 people were forced to evacuate. Many lost their homes to the floodwaters.

Yet the disaster unfolding in North Dakota might be bringing even bigger headlines if such extreme events hadn't suddenly seemed more common. In this year alone massive blizzards have struck the U.S. Northeast, tornadoes have ripped through the nation, mighty rivers like the Mississippi and Missouri have flowed over their banks, and floodwaters have covered huge swaths of Australia as well as displaced more than five million people in China and devastated Colombia. And this year's natural disasters follow on the heels of a staggering litany of extreme weather in 2010, from record floods in Nashville, Tenn., and Pakistan, to Russia's crippling heat wave.

These patterns have caught the attention of scientists at the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C., part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). They've been following the recent deluges' stunning radar pictures and growing rainfall totals with concern and intense interest. Normally, floods of the magnitude now being seen in North Dakota and elsewhere around the world are expected to happen only once in 100 years. But one of the predictions of climate change models is that extreme weather—floods, heat waves, droughts, even blizzards—will become far more common. "Big rain events and higher overnight lows are two things we would expect with [a] warming world," says Deke Arndt, chief of the center's Climate Monitoring Branch. Arndt's group had already documented a stunning rise in overnight low temperatures across the U.S. So are the floods and spate of other recent extreme events also examples of predictions turned into cold, hard reality?

...

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=extreme-weather-caused-by-climate-change

:eek:

Rebel Yell
06-30-2011, 12:57 PM
If climate change is causing massive flooding, why can't we get any rain here?

The Night Owl
06-30-2011, 01:00 PM
If climate change is causing massive flooding, why can't we get any rain here?

RTFA:


But one of the predictions of climate change models is that extreme weather—floods, heat waves, droughts, even blizzards—will become far more common.

:D

Rebel Yell
06-30-2011, 01:03 PM
RTFA:



:D

I missed that part.:o

My poop was runny this morning. Was that climate change, too?;)

obx
06-30-2011, 01:30 PM
Yeah, there was never any extreme weather before global warming.

Rockntractor
06-30-2011, 01:39 PM
I think it would be news if the climate didn't change.

lacarnut
06-30-2011, 01:41 PM
I think it would be news if the climate didn't change.

But then the loonies on the left would have nothing to bitch about.

Rockntractor
06-30-2011, 01:46 PM
But then the loonies on the left would have nothing to bitch about.

Our rodent eating friend wouldn't make any money spamming forums either.

lacarnut
06-30-2011, 01:56 PM
Our rodent eating friend wouldn't make any money spamming forums either.

NICE

SarasotaRepub
06-30-2011, 08:05 PM
When we see 10 inches of snow here in Sarasota I MIGHT get alarmed. :rolleyes::D

Novaheart
06-30-2011, 08:57 PM
Submitted without comment...



http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=extreme-weather-caused-by-climate-change

:eek:

Even when I was a kid, in a water oriented community where people had the sense to build houses either away from the shoreline or up on stilts, I would see the footage on TV and ask, "Daddy, why don't they put their houses up higher?"

Ten years later, I simply looked the other way, as the same places got flooded again. If you build in the flood plain, you will probably get flooded. This is true of Ocean City Maryland, Arlandria Virginia, or East Bumfock Midwest.

Rockntractor
06-30-2011, 09:02 PM
Even when I was a kid, in a water oriented community where people had the sense to build houses either away from the shoreline or up on stilts, I would see the footage on TV and ask, "Daddy, why don't they put their houses up higher?"

Ten years later, I simply looked the other way, as the same places got flooded again. If you build in the flood plain, you will probably get flooded. This is true of Ocean City Maryland, Arlandria Virginia, or East Bumfock Midwest.

That's because they always have plenty of your money to rebuild with.