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megimoo
09-08-2008, 06:11 PM
30 A.M. (0730 GMT) on Wednesday,The World Will Fall Into A Black Hole !

CERN has had to launch a PR campaign aimed at reassuring the public that the LHC will not create black holes that could engulf the planet or an unpleasant hypothetical particle called a strangelet that would turn the Earth into a lump of goo.

It has commissioned a panel to verify its calculations that such risks are, by any reasonable thinking, impossible, and France too has carried out its own safety probe.

Either way, the end of the world will not happen on Wednesday, for the simple reason that the LHC will not generate any collisions that day.

the first protons will be injected into a 27-kilometre (16.9-mile) ring-shaped tunnel, straddling the Swiss-French border at the headquarters of the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN).
snip
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Physicists have long puzzled over how particles acquire mass.

In 1964, a British physicist, Peter Higgs, came up with this idea: there must exist a background field that would act rather like treacle.

Particles passing through it would acquire mass by being dragged through a mediator, which theoreticians dubbed the Higgs Boson.

The standard quip about the Higgs is that it is the "God Particle" -- it is everywhere but remains frustratingly elusive.

French physicist Yves Sacquin says that heroic work by the LEP and Fermilab has narrowed down the energy range at which the devious critter is likely to spotted.

Given the LHC's capabilities, "there's a very strong probability that it will be detected," he said.

Some experts are also hopeful about an early LHC breakthrough on the question of supersymmetry.

The supersymmetry theory goes way beyond even the Higgs. It postulates that particles in the Standard Model have related, but more massive, counterparts.

Such particles could explain the unsettling discovery of recent years that visible matter only accounts for some four percent of the Universe. Enigmatic phenomena called dark matter and dark energy account for the rest.
snip
..................................
The CERN atom-smasher: A factfile

Here is a snapshot of the world's biggest atom-smasher, due to start operations on Wednesday at CERN (the European Organisation for Nuclear Research) near Geneva:

-- The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will accelerate hydrogen protons or lead ions to more than 99.9999 percent of the speed of light. The experiments will take place in a ring-shaped tunnel 27 kilometres (16.9 miles) long and up to 175 metres (568 feet) below the ground. The tunnel stretches out from Swiss territory and into France, looping back into Switzerland.

-- The beams run in parallel in opposite directions. Powerful superconducting magnets then "bend" the beams so that streams of particles collide within four large chambers. The smashups will fleetingly generate temperatures 100,000 hotter than the Sun, replicating the conditions that prevailed just after the "Big Bang" that created the Universe 13.7 billion years ago.

-- Swathing the chambers are detectors which will give a 3-D image of the traces of sub-atomic particles hurled out from the protons' destruction. These traces are then closely analysed in the search for movements, properties or novel particles that could advance our understanding of matter.

-- In top gear, the LHC will generate nearly a billion collisions per second. Above ground, a farm of 3,000 computers, one of the largest in the world, will instantly crunch this number down to about 100 collisions that are of the most interest. The data will then be sent out to a grid of institutions and universities around the world for analysis -- a sort of mini-World Wide Web of its own.

-- The tunnel is the world's largest fridge. The super-magnets are chilled to a temperature as low as -271 degrees Celsius (-456.25 degrees Fahrenheit), which is colder than deep outer space, to help them overcome resistance.

-- The collision chambers are herculean in scale. The biggest, called ATLAS, is 46 metres (149.5 feet) long and 25 metres (81.25 feet) high, or about half the size of the Notre Dame Catheral in Paris. At 7,000 tonnes, ATLAS weighs almost as much as the Eiffel Tower, and has 3,000 kilometres (1,875 miles) of cabling. Nearly 300,000 tonnes of rock were dug to house ATLAS and 50,000 tonnes of concrete were poured. In one year, ATLAS will generate 3,200 terabytes of raw data, equivalent to 160 times the three billion books in the US Library of Congress.

-- In the course of a 10-hour experiment, a beam might travel more than 10 billion kilometres (six billion miles), enough to get to Neptune and back. At full intensity, each beam will have the equivalent energy of a car travelling at 1,600 kilometres (1,000 miles) per hour. The LHC will use up 120 megawatts of power, equal to all the households in the Geneva area.

-- LHC collisions will generate 14 teraelectron volts (TeV), amounting to a high concentration of energy but only at an extraordinarily tiny scale. One TeV is the equivalent energy of motion of a flying mosquito. There is no safety risk, says CERN.

-- The LHC cost 6.03 billion Swiss francs (5.46 billion dollars, 3.9 3.76 billion euros) to build.

http://www.physorg.com/news140059929.html

LogansPapa
09-08-2008, 06:26 PM
STOP THE MADNESS!!!

http://www.claytoncramer.com/pictures/kitty-thumb.gif

hampshirebrit
09-08-2008, 06:29 PM
Shit.

At least you Americans will be tucked up with your teddy-bears at 0730 Zulu.

I'll be awake, deciding what time to get out of bed.

Just damn.

LogansPapa
09-08-2008, 06:39 PM
Earth from the moon's perspective on Wednesday:

http://beautifulgoddess.files.wordpress.com/2007/08/04_jupiter2010.jpg

JB
09-08-2008, 06:45 PM
Stop panicking!!! We won't be dead for about another month.

They're firing it up on Wednesday. They're going to test the beams in one direction and then test the beams in the other direction.

The smashy-smash won't start until about a month from now.

I'll be in confession every night if anyone needs me.

megimoo
09-08-2008, 07:03 PM
Shit.

At least you Americans will be tucked up with your teddy-bears at 0730 Zulu.

I'll be awake, deciding what time to get out of bed.

Just damn.Hampshirebrit: A question if you will :"a background field that would act rather like treacle. " What is a treacle?One source has it as molasses but that makes no sense in his useage ?"

Bubba Dawg
09-08-2008, 08:48 PM
Shit.

At least you Americans will be tucked up with your teddy-bears at 0730 Zulu.

I'll be awake, deciding what time to get out of bed.

Just damn.

Come on Hamps, it's not like it's the end of the wor.....um

Eat pancakes that morning. With whipped cream. :D

Bubba Dawg
09-08-2008, 08:50 PM
I'm gonna do an End of the World Jukebox that night.

Gotta have a soundtrack to such a momentous event.

hampshirebrit
09-09-2008, 04:39 AM
Hampshirebrit: A question if you will :"a background field that would act rather like treacle. " What is a treacle?One source has it as molasses but that makes no sense in his useage ?"

It's sort of a thinner molasses..very sticky.

Sonnabend
09-09-2008, 07:41 AM
..and yet another Chicken Little panic merchant heard from :rolleyes:

I have been hearing this twaddle for weeks..it, like Global Warming and other doomsday scenarios, will pass away when the sun rises, the birds sing and people head off for work.

Tell me again why I should believe any of these bullshit artists....I meant to ask, has anyone checked with Night Owl to see if the collider has been peer reviewed..? :rolleyes:

(I see the joke..I also see that this is yet another ":he worlds going to end" BS story..did you know that the scientists received death threats?)

patriot45
09-09-2008, 01:55 PM
..and yet another Chicken Little panic merchant heard from :rolleyes:

I have been hearing this twaddle for weeks..it, like Global Warming and other doomsday scenarios, will pass away when the sun rises, the birds sing and people head off for work.

Tell me again why I should believe any of these bullshit artists....I meant to ask, has anyone checked with Night Owl to see if the collider has been peer reviewed..? :rolleyes:

(I see the joke..I also see that this is yet another ":he worlds going to end" BS story..did you know that the scientists received death threats?)

Because this, unlike GW, IS man made, and they have no idea of the outcome! Let the pniheads end the world testing thier theory. Don't they watch the sci-fi channel. Doom!

megimoo
09-09-2008, 02:03 PM
It's sort of a thinner molasses..very sticky.thank you !

noonwitch
09-09-2008, 02:30 PM
Whatever news show I was watching this morning was really scaring me about this, but then I figured, I've lived a good life and if this is it, I guess this is it.

There is one thing I'd like to do before I die, but somehow I think I could get my 20-something male coworker, who told us all "I'm a freak", to indulge me if it came down to it.

LogansPapa
09-09-2008, 02:46 PM
http://www.stardestroyer.net/Empire/Tech/Beam/Boom.jpg

Not to worry - they have back-up systems. (now everybody back-up):rolleyes:

JB
09-09-2008, 02:52 PM
There is one thing I'd like to do before I die, but somehow I think I could get my 20-something male coworker, who told us all "I'm a freak", to indulge me if it came down to it.:eek:

Nothing ventured, nothing gained. ;)

hampshirebrit
09-09-2008, 03:12 PM
thank you !

You're most welcome.

This is what my mother used to use when she made treacle pudding:

https://www.surfasonline.com/images/products/12180L.jpg

I believe it's still available, in the UK.

The relevance to the OP thread is that, were one to drop one's treacle pudding, not only would it have attracted instant maternal wrath, but it would have attracted and permanently attached itself to any object it came into contact with, including coins, carpet fibres, dropped airfix parts,in fact, pretty much anything.

It's not a bad analogy for a black hole, in other words.

hampshirebrit
09-09-2008, 03:25 PM
..and yet another Chicken Little panic merchant heard from :rolleyes:



The East Coasters will still be asleep, the Left Coasters will still be stoned, I'll be just waking up, and you will be getting back home after work.

It'd be a real bummer to get sucked in to a black hole AFTER a full day's work.

Looks like you get the front seat for this one. Let us know how it went for you. :p :D

gator
09-09-2008, 03:34 PM
The East Coasters will still be asleep, the Left Coasters will still be stoned, I'll be just waking up, and you will be getting back home after work.

It'd be a real bummer to get sucked in to a black hole AFTER a full day's work.

Looks like you get the front seat for this one. Let us know how it went for you. :p :D


I understand that matter is pulled into a Black Hole at the speed of light so we will never what hit us. It will happen in an instant.

You know Bud, this is really a bummer. I never saw it coming. I never figured I would die being pulled into a man made Black Hole here on earth. I always thought I would die of a heart attack or a disease or something like that.

Rebel Yell
09-09-2008, 03:47 PM
I understand that matter is pulled into a Black Hole at the speed of light so we will never what hit us. It will happen in an instant.

You know Bud, this is really a bummer. I never saw it coming. I never figured I would die being pulled into a man made Black Hole here on earth. I always thought I would die of a heart attack or a disease or something like that.

Old, cranky farts like you don't die. You just rust.:D

megimoo
09-09-2008, 04:24 PM
Will the world end on Wednesday?


Be a bit of a pain if it did, wouldn't it? And the most frustrating thing is that we won't know for sure either way until the European laboratory for particle physics (Cern) in Geneva switches on its Large Hadron Collider the day after tomorrow.

If you think it's unlikely that we will all be sucked into a giant black hole that will swallow the world, as German chemistry professor Otto Rössler of the University of Tübingen posits, and so carry on with your life as normal, only to find out that it's true, you'll be a bit miffed, won't you?

If, on the other hand, you disagree with theoretical physicist Prof Sir Chris Llewellyn Smith of the UK Atomic Energy Agency, who argues that fears of possible global self-ingestion have been exaggerated, and decide to live the next two days as if they were your last, and then nothing whatsoever happens, you'd feel a bit of a fool too.

Rössler apparently thinks it "quite plausible" that the "mini black holes" the Cern atom-smasher creates "will survive and grow exponentially and eat the planet from the inside". So convinced is he that he has lodged an EU court lawsuit alleging that the project violates the right to life guaranteed under the European Convention of Human Rights.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2008/sep/08/particlephysics.physics

megimoo
09-09-2008, 06:33 PM
-Five facts about CERN's Large Hadron Collider


- Following are five facts about the 10 billion Swiss franc ($9 billion) Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will smash together particles at close to the speed of light after its start-up on Wednesday at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN):

* Though built to study the smallest known building blocks of all things -- known as particles -- the LHC is the largest and most complex machine ever made. It has a circumference of 27 km (17 miles) and lies 100 metres (330 feet) under the ground, straddling French and Swiss territory.

* At full power, trillions of protons will race around the LHC accelerator ring 11,245 times a second, travelling at 99.99 percent the speed of light. It is capable of engineering 600 million collisions every second.

* When two beams of protons collide, they will generate temperatures more than 100,000 times hotter than the heart of the sun, concentrated within a miniscule space. Meanwhile, the cooling system that circulates superfluid helium around the LHC's accelerator ring keeps the machine at minus 271.3 degrees Celsius (minus 456.34 degrees Fahrenheit).

* To collect data of up to 600 million proton collisions per second, physicists and scientists have built devices to measure the passage time of a particle to a few billionths of a second. The trigger system also registers the location of particles to millionths of a metre.

* The data recorded by the LHC's big experiments will fill around 100,000 dual-layer DVDs each year. Tens of thousands of computers around the world have been harnessed in a computing network called "The Grid" that will hold the information.

http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/L8102127.htm

Sonnabend
09-10-2008, 05:02 AM
We are still here.

The world did not come to an end.

The doomsayers and panic merchants are hereby invited to go play in the traffic.

Goldwater
09-10-2008, 05:51 AM
Hey, we're not dead.

Damn you science!

FlaGator
09-10-2008, 06:30 AM
We are still here.

The world did not come to an end.

The doomsayers and panic merchants are hereby invited to go play in the traffic.

They aren't actually crashing anything right now. It was merely a test of one of the particle streams. The collisions start next month.

Goldwater
09-10-2008, 06:49 AM
They aren't actually crashing anything right now. It was merely a test of one of the particle streams. The collisions start next month.

So we die next month?

Excellent.

GrumpyOldLady
09-10-2008, 10:34 AM
It was just a test.

We don't have to worry for a few more weeks until they start their Frankenstein like experiments.

If I die, I don't care. I'm sick as a dog all the time anyways (many health problems).

FlaGator
09-10-2008, 10:37 AM
So we die next month?

Excellent.

Being a Christian I'd have to say that I'm covered in any event :D

LogansPapa
09-10-2008, 10:46 AM
Being a Christian I'd have to say that I'm covered in any event :D

:rolleyes:Oh, who didn't see that coming?:cool:

LogansPapa
09-10-2008, 10:55 AM
Q&A: The Big Bang Machine

NPR.org, September 9, 2008 · Physicists threw the switch Wednesday on what is arguably the most powerful and most complex science experiment ever conducted.

It's an underground ring of superconducting magnets, reaching from Switzerland into France, that will smash together subatomic particles with terrifying force.

For the next month, scientists will be testing the ability to send beams of protons around the 17-mile tunnel at the international CERN laboratory. The Large Hadron Collider will push these proton beams close to the speed of light.

The first actual collisions may begin in about a month, when proton beams traveling in opposite directions are brought together.

When the experiment is fully operational, collisions will occur 600 million times every second, producing a spray of subatomic debris. Scientists hope this debris will resemble conditions close to those just after the big bang, the theorized colossal explosion that created the universe.

Somewhere in that subatomic smashup haystack, physicists may find the following needles:

The Hypothetical Higgs Particle

What do we think it does?

It gives things mass. The Higgs particle, named after physicist Peter Higgs, would be a companion to an (also hypothetical) Higgs "field." The field would pervade the universe and act like cosmic molasses, making everything hard to move. That's what we call mass.

Why do we need it?

Without the Higgs particle, electrons would have no mass and atoms wouldn't stick together. We would fall apart into piles of atomic nuclei.

How likely is it that it's real?

High. Physicists generally agree the Higgs or something like it must exist.

How hard would it be to find?

It depends on the Higgs particle's characteristics. Scientists think the Higgs doesn't live long and quickly decays into other particles. Depending on what those are, physicists might be able to pick out Higgs fingerprints quickly, or it could take years of sifting through data.

Dark Matter

What is it?

Dark matter is the name given to the mysterious invisible material that seems to hang around galaxies. Estimates are that 20 percent of the stuff in the universe is dark matter. Astronomers call it dark because they can't see it.

If it's invisible, how do you find it?

You don't — or at least not directly. If the LHC makes dark matter particles, they will escape without leaving a trace. But physicists are prepared. They should be able to notice its absence.

What is the likelihood it will appear?

Unclear. Many physicists believe that dark matter particles are part of a whole family of new particles. This theory, known as Supersymmetry (SUSY), says that every known particle has a heavier sibling. The problem is, no one has ever observed one of these hefty partners.

Miniature Black Holes

What are they?

Teeny, tiny, superdense objects.

Should I be worried?

No, they wouldn't live long. Estimates are a thousandth of a trillionth of a trillionth of a second.

How do you detect one?

A miniature black hole would collapse and can create all particle types that exist.

What is the likelihood mini black holes really will appear?

Physicists agree they're a long shot. Miniature black holes appear in some theories that say there are extra, tiny dimensions to space-time. And while the idea of extra dimensions is popular — as part of something called string theory for instance — they don't necessarily allow for mini black holes.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=94422852

megimoo
09-10-2008, 10:59 AM
Stephen Hawking: Large Hadron Collider vital for humanity

Prof Hawking said the £4.4bn machine, in which scientists are about to recreate conditions just after the Big Bang, is "vital if the human race is not to stultify and eventually die out."

And he sought to ease fears that the machine could have apocalyptic effects. "The world will not come to an end when the LHC turns on," Prof Hawking said, adding: "The LHC is absolutely safe."

Scientists at the CERN research centre in Switzerland are aiming to use the machine to gain a better understanding of the birth and structure of the universe, and to fill gaps in our knowledge of physics.

They hope that by recreating the moments after the Big Bang - the massive explosion thought to have created the universe - the experiment will make clearer what the universe is made of, what makes it expand and also to predict its future.

Prof Hawking, the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, said: "The LHC will increase the energy at which we can study particle interactions by a factor of four."

However, he doubts that the machine will have the power to unravel some of the universe's more elusive secrets such as the putative Higgs boson particle - thought to have given mass to all other particles.

Prof Hawking said he has placed a bet of $100 that the scientists won't find the Higgs boson - the so-called "God particle."

"Another discovery that we might make is superpartners, partners for all the particles we know ... they could make up the mysterious dark matter that holds galaxies together," he told BBC Radio 4.

"Whatever the LHC finds or fails to find, the results will tell us a lot about the structure of the universe," Prof Hawking added.

However he dismissed speculation that the world could be put in grave danger by the force of the experiment.

"The LHC is absolutely safe. If the collisions in the LHC produced a micro black hole - and this is unlikely - it would just evaporate away again, producing a correctoristic pattern of particles," he said.

"Collisions releasing greater energy occur millions of times a day in the earth's atmosphere and nothing terrible happens. The world will not come to an end when the LHC turns on."

However he pointed out that if the LHC were indeed to create minor black holes, his own work on the subject could be verified and he chould receive the highest acclaim in the field.

He said: "If the LHC were to produce little black holes, I don't think there is any doubt I would get a Nobel Prize, if they showed the properties I predict.

"However I think the the probability that the LHC has enough energy to produce little black holes is less than 1 per cent - so I'm not holding my breath."

Asked whether the results of the LHC experiment would offer immediate practical benefits for our day-to-day lives, Prof Hawking urged patience.

He said: "Throughout history, people have studied pure science from a desire to understand the universe, rather than practical applications for commercial gain. But their discoveries later turned out to have great practical benefits.

"It is difficult to see an economic return from research at the LHC, but that doesn't mean there wont be any."

Prof Hawking made clear that the LHC project is one of the most important in the history of scientific endeavour. Asked to choose between it and the space program, he said: "That is like asking which of my children I would choose to sacrifice.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2710348/Stephen-Hawking-Large-Hadron-Collider-vital-for-humanity.html

cowbell
09-10-2008, 11:01 PM
SCIENCE RAP!

http://www.blogsmithmedia.com/www.engadget.com/media/2008/08/lhc_rap.jpg

Sonnabend
09-11-2008, 06:27 AM
:rolleyes:Oh, who didn't see that coming?:cool:

Faith is an anchor, and a source of strength when the storm comes.

No one expects you to believe, shitwit. Many of us here do. Deal with it.

LogansPapa
09-11-2008, 10:25 AM
Faith is an anchor, and a source of strength when the storm comes.

No one expects you to believe, shitwit. Many of us here do. Deal with it.

It was an inside joke, fuctard. FlaGator and I understand each other's religious position - and you're not a part of that - so kindly piss off.

us marriage
06-11-2009, 11:34 AM
LIMA, May 6 - A Peruvian air force Boeing 737, chartered by U.S.-based Occidental Petroleum Corp., crashed in the Amazon jungle late on Tuesday, killing up to 74 of the 87 people aboard, Occidental said on Wednesday. "We have accounted for 13 (survivors), and that's all we can say at this time," Occidental executive vice-president Bob Ireland told a news conference in Lima.

"Early indications were that there was a crash with a fire and when we overflew it with a helicopter that was what we determined," Ireland said. Some of the survivors were found almost unhurt and on their feet, but others were more seriously injured, an Occidental spokeswoman said earlier. Rescue workers combing the wreckage in swampy ground under heavy rain found bodies but others were still unaccounted for.

Dazed, weeping relatives of victims gathered at Occidental's Iquitos offices as the day wore on. A local funeral director told reporters that Occidental had ordered 40 coffins. The jet, carrying 79 Occidental workers and oil subcontractors and a crew of eight, crashed at about 9:30 p.m. on Tuesday (0230 GMT on Wednesday) when it was coming in to land at Andoas, Occidental's main base camp in the jungle near the border with Ecuador in northern Peru.

Gingersnap
06-11-2009, 11:45 AM
Thanks, Moo! I was looking for something to jazz up the Doom Forum. :D

megimoo
06-11-2009, 05:19 PM
I understand that matter is pulled into a Black Hole at the speed of light so we will never what hit us. It will happen in an instant.

You know Bud, this is really a bummer. I never saw it coming. I never figured I would die being pulled into a man made Black Hole here on earth. I always thought I would die of a heart attack or a disease or something like that.
Not exactly true,first you go into orbit around the event horizon like the water spiraling around a sink drain and you are stretched out in length while being bombarded with every known radiation in creation as you spiral around.

If you were still alive, which is highly unlikely, after several hundred years you would arrive at the vortex and disappear into the singularity stretched out into infinity !

Rebel Yell
06-12-2009, 09:40 AM
Not exactly true,first you go into orbit around the event horizon like the water spiraling around a sink drain and you are stretched out in length while being bombarded with every known radiation in creation as you spiral around.

If you were still alive, which is highly unlikely, after several hundred years you would arrive at the vortex and disappear into the singularity stretched out into infinity !

I thought it would be more like this on the other side of the vortex......
www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0MRU1f2SJ0

Dan D. Doty
06-12-2009, 12:57 PM
Guys CERN is about to change the world is ways you can't imagine; this will be like the moon landing, a great date in history.

Rebel Yell
06-12-2009, 01:08 PM
Guys CERN is about to change the world is ways you can't imagine; this will be like the moon landing, a great date in history.

What's so great about it?

While we're at it, what was so great about the moon landing? How, exactly, did it benefit us? Don't give me the touchy - feely, liberal "It made us feel good" answer.

megimoo
06-12-2009, 02:42 PM
What's so great about it?

While we're at it, what was so great about the moon landing? How, exactly, did it benefit us? Don't give me the touchy - feely, liberal "It made us feel good" answer.We have real Moon Stones now .The moon fairies now can dance in about in secular purity !
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjkYjoyeyWg&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Etruveo%2Ecom%2Fsailor%2Dmo on%2Dfairy%2Dtale%2Fid%2F2229050033&feature=player_embedded

FlaGator
06-12-2009, 02:55 PM
What's so great about it?

While we're at it, what was so great about the moon landing? How, exactly, did it benefit us? Don't give me the touchy - feely, liberal "It made us feel good" answer.

The enhancements in technology due to the development of lunar travel advanced just about every major engineering industry from computers to propulsion to aerodynamics to climate control technology to to communications industry to ... well just about everything. The technology that the moon program gave us and the stuff that was later developed from it has more than paid for the cost of the program itself, in my opinion.

megimoo
06-12-2009, 07:20 PM
The enhancements in technology due to the development of lunar travel advanced just about every major engineering industry from computers to propulsion to aerodynamics to climate control technology to to communications industry to ... well just about everything. The technology that the moon program gave us and the stuff that was later developed from it has more than paid for the cost of the program itself, in my opinion.

Every time we do something together of this magnitude the results always improve technology .
Unfortunately most often it happens to be warfare but the moon mission was different.The computer on the LEM (Lunar Excursion Module ) failed at landing due to a faulty power switch but they were able to fix it on the spot.The technology of that computer was an MIT hybrid design that didn't even match what most people have in their home PC'S today.

Even today's AEGIS missile defence systems on board our latest DDG or CG's are using old technology and primitive non windows operating system software yet it was able to destroy a dead satellite at 133 miles
(nautical miles = 6000ft=1 mile) over the pacific ocean .http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RH5mtp0mjE&NR=1

A single modified tactical Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) launches from the U.S. Navy AEGIS cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG 70), successfully impacting a non-functioning National Reconnaissance Office satellite approximately 247 kilometers (133 nautical miles) over the Pacific Ocean, as it traveled in space at more than 17,000 mph. President George W. Bush decided to bring down the satellite because of the likelihood that the satellite could release hydrazine fuel upon impact, possibly in populated areas.

Our Main ABM system with the SBX radar The radar is described by Lt. Gen Trey Obering (director of MDA) as being able to track an object the size of a baseball over San Francisco in California from the Chesapeake Bay in Virginia, approximately 2,900 miles (4,700 km). The radar will guide land-based missiles from Alaska and California, as well as in-theatre assets.

Dan D. Doty
06-12-2009, 10:31 PM
What's so great about it?

While we're at it, what was so great about the moon landing? How, exactly, did it benefit us? Don't give me the touchy - feely, liberal "It made us feel good" answer.

Mirco Blackholes will be a new power source that will one day give us unlimited free energy; as fore the Moon landing it was our first into the reaches of the Universe. Man is an inventor and explorer, forever moving ahead.

MBH will become one the main power system space ships ( maybe even star ships). One day you tell people you were there when everything changed.

megimoo
06-12-2009, 11:54 PM
Mirco Blackholes will be a new power source that will one day give us unlimited free energy; as fore the Moon landing it was our first into the reaches of the Universe. Man is an inventor and explorer, forever moving ahead.

MBH will become one the main power system space ships ( maybe even star ships). One day you tell people you were there when everything changed.
The problem with the Micro black hole theory is they haven't sufficient mass to even exist.Black holes are the results of enormous gravitational fields that need stupendous amounts of collapsed mass to generate .

Collapsed stellar mass is a sort of 'nuclear soup' of matter with crushed atoms all jammed together without orbiting electrons .The resulting density creates gravitational waves that draw all matter and even bend photons of light into orbit around them .

There is no known shielding from Gravity so anything in the vicinity would be drawn inward and torn apart by the tidal forces.Black holes are a sort of mid Galactic Stellar drain hole where excess stellar matter spirals into and stays crushed into packed matter at the singularity .These gravity monsters and the tides that they create are what cause the galaxies to rotate .

Think of a blanket held by the corners and streatched between four strong men with a bowling ball in the center and what happens when you spin an eight ball around the blankets surface !

Dan D. Doty
06-17-2009, 02:26 PM
June 17th, the count down is on.

Will we be here tomorrow, or Friday? I think so.