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View Full Version : The Gun Walker Cover Up Unravels Congressional investigations are intensified.



megimoo
09-02-2011, 04:28 PM
The Gun Walker investigative team of Rep. Darrell Issa and Senator Charles Grassley announced yesterday that their probe into this almost unbelievable scandal will be growing wider. ......They’ve got evidence of a cover-up at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms to pursue, as reported by CBS News – which deserves kudos for being the mainstream news organized most determined to get to the bottom of this story:

Congressional investigators tell CBS News there's evidence the U.S. Attorney's office in Arizona sought to cover up a link between their controversial gunwalking operation known as "Fast and Furious" and the death of Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry.

Terry was murdered in Arizona near the US border last December. Two assault rifles ATF had allegedly allowed onto the street without interdiction were found at the scene.

But the US Attorney​'s office working both the Terry murder and the "Fast and Furious" operation did not immediately disclose the two had any link. Two Republicans investigating the scandal, Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA) and Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA) say there's evidence that officials at ATF and the US Attorney's office sought to hide the connection.

In a letter, Grassley and Issa say the lead prosecutor on Fast and Furious, Assistant US Attorney Emory Hurley, learned almost immediately that guns allowed onto the street in his case, had been recovered at Terry's murder. "(I)n the hours after Agent Terry's death," says the letter from Grassley and Issa, Hurley apparently "contemplated the connection between the two cases and sought to prevent the connection from being disclosed." The Justice Department recently transferred Hurley out of the criminal division into the civil division.

That’s not all Hurley did, according to the letter from Issa and Grassley:

Witnesses have reported that AUSA Hurley may have stifled ATF agents’ attempts to interdict weapons on numerous occasions. Many ATF agents working on Operation Fast and Furious were under the impression that even some of the most basic law enforcement techniques typically used to interdict weapons required the explicit approval of your office, specifically from AUSA Hurley. It is our understanding that this approval was withheld on numerous occasions. It is unclear why all the available tools, such as civil forfeitures and seizure warrants, were not used in this case to prevent illegally purchased guns from being trafficked to Mexican drug cartels and other criminals. We have further been informed that AUSA Hurley improperly instructed ATF agents that they needed to meet unnecessarily strict evidentiary standards merely in order to temporarily detain or speak with suspects.

Issa and Grassley describe U.S. Attorney Dennis Burke’s refusal to grant crime victim status to the family of slain Border Patrol agent Brian Terry, in the trial of Gun Walker straw buyer Jaime Avila, as “disquieting.” Such status would be granted to people like the Terry family as a matter of routine in any other case… but in this particular case, it would constitute the official admission of a crime that would suck in a lot of alphabet-soup federal agencies.

http://www.humanevents.com/article.php?id=45940

megimoo
09-02-2011, 04:33 PM
The Gun Walker investigative team of Rep. Darrell Issa and Senator Charles Grassley announced yesterday that their probe into this almost unbelievable scandal will be growing wider. ......They’ve got evidence of a cover-up at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms to pursue, as reported by CBS News – which deserves kudos for being the mainstream news organized most determined to get to the bottom of this story:

Congressional investigators tell CBS News there's evidence the U.S. Attorney's office in Arizona sought to cover up a link between their controversial gunwalking operation known as "Fast and Furious" and the death of Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry.

Terry was murdered in Arizona near the US border last December. Two assault rifles ATF had allegedly allowed onto the street without interdiction were found at the scene.

But the US Attorney​'s office working both the Terry murder and the "Fast and Furious" operation did not immediately disclose the two had any link. Two Republicans investigating the scandal, Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA) and Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA) say there's evidence that officials at ATF and the US Attorney's office sought to hide the connection.

In a letter, Grassley and Issa say the lead prosecutor on Fast and Furious, Assistant US Attorney Emory Hurley, learned almost immediately that guns allowed onto the street in his case, had been recovered at Terry's murder. "(I)n the hours after Agent Terry's death," says the letter from Grassley and Issa, Hurley apparently "contemplated the connection between the two cases and sought to prevent the connection from being disclosed." The Justice Department recently transferred Hurley out of the criminal division into the civil division.

That’s not all Hurley did, according to the letter from Issa and Grassley:

Witnesses have reported that AUSA Hurley may have stifled ATF agents’ attempts to interdict weapons on numerous occasions. Many ATF agents working on Operation Fast and Furious were under the impression that even some of the most basic law enforcement techniques typically used to interdict weapons required the explicit approval of your office, specifically from AUSA Hurley. It is our understanding that this approval was withheld on numerous occasions. It is unclear why all the available tools, such as civil forfeitures and seizure warrants, were not used in this case to prevent illegally purchased guns from being trafficked to Mexican drug cartels and other criminals. We have further been informed that AUSA Hurley improperly instructed ATF agents that they needed to meet unnecessarily strict evidentiary standards merely in order to temporarily detain or speak with suspects.

Issa and Grassley describe U.S. Attorney Dennis Burke’s refusal to grant crime victim status to the family of slain Border Patrol agent Brian Terry, in the trial of Gun Walker straw buyer Jaime Avila, as “disquieting.” Such status would be granted to people like the Terry family as a matter of routine in any other case… but in this particular case, it would constitute the official admission of a crime that would suck in a lot of alphabet-soup federal agencies.

http://www.humanevents.com/article.php?id=45940

The L.A. Times has uncovered other links between the Gun Walker debacle and the White House, and in this case, the name of Operation Fast and Furious was invoked:

Newly obtained emails show that the White House was better informed about a failed gun-tracking operation on the border with Mexico than was previously known.

Three White House national security officials were given some details about the operation, dubbed Fast and Furious. The operation allowed firearms to be illegally purchased, with the goal of tracking them to Mexican drug cartels. But the effort went out of control after agents lost track of many of the weapons.

The supervisor of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives operation in Phoenix specifically mentioned Fast and Furious in at least one email to a White House national security official, and two other White House colleagues were briefed on reports from the supervisor, according to White House emails and a senior administration official.
http://www.humanevents.com/article.php?id=45940
.........
SNIP
Weich said that although the "ATF does not have complete information" on all of the lost guns, "it is our understanding that ATF is aware of 11 instances" beyond the Border Patrol agent's killing where a Fast and Furious firearm "was recovered in connection with a crime of violence in the United States."

Justice Department officials did not provide any more details about the crimes or how many guns were found.

But a source close to the controversy, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the continuing investigation, said that as early as January 2010, just after the operation began, weapons had turned up at crime scenes in Phoenix, Nogales, Douglas and Glendale in Arizona, and in El Paso. The largest haul was 40 weapons at one crime scene in El Paso.

In all, 57 of the operation's weapons were recovered at those six crime scenes, in addition to the two seized where Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry was killed.

Is the Gun Walker cover-up worse than the crime? It’s hard to tell. We haven’t finished tallying up the body count from the crimes yet.

Chuck58
09-02-2011, 04:38 PM
They've got several emails to the White House regarding Fast and Furious. Apparently, these emails bypassed Holder who denies knowledge of the operation. :rolleyes:

What I'm wondering is, if they'll discover that a whole lot of money changed hands between the cartels and some of these people, and how high that money went.

I hope Issa and Grassley crank up the pressure. This shows signs of going all the way to the top.