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SaintLouieWoman
09-02-2011, 04:59 PM
I have often wondered why it is that Conservatives are called the "right"
and Liberals are called the "left."
By chance I stumbled upon this verse in the Bible:
"The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left."
Ecclesiastes 10:2
Thus sayeth the Lord. Amen.
Can't get any simpler than that.


Sent by a neighbor here who's a retired marine.

Rockntractor
09-02-2011, 05:26 PM
I look at it as right and wrong.

BadCat
09-03-2011, 07:26 AM
sin·is·ter
[sin-uh-ster]
adjective
1.
threatening or portending evil, harm, or trouble; ominous: a sinister remark.
2.
bad, evil, base, or wicked; fell: his sinister purposes.
3.
unfortunate; disastrous; unfavorable: a sinister accident.
4.
of or on the left side; left.

Does the technical definition say enough?

AmPat
09-03-2011, 11:08 AM
Clear enough for me.

Novaheart
09-03-2011, 11:17 AM
I have often wondered why it is that Conservatives are called the "right"
and Liberals are called the "left."

It's of settled origin. It has something to do with the French Parliament and what side people sat on. Seriously, no more sinister or biblical than that.

marv
09-03-2011, 11:23 AM
It's of settled origin. It has something to do with the French Parliament and what side people sat on. Seriously, no more sinister or biblical than that.

Well, at last Nova got something correct - or should I have said "right".........:D

AmPat
09-03-2011, 11:45 AM
It's of settled origin. It has something to do with the French Parliament and what side people sat on. Seriously, no more sinister or biblical than that.

The left is "sinister" due to their departure from freedom and their love of government chains.

Novaheart
09-03-2011, 01:14 PM
The left is "sinister" due to their departure from freedom and their love of government chains.

The terms "left" and "right" appeared during the French Revolution of 1789 when members of the National Assembly divided into supporters of the king to the president's right and supporters of the revolution to his left. One deputy, the Baron de Gauville explained, "We began to recognize each other: those who were loyal to religion and the king took up positions to the right of the chair ....


You must be very proud