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View Full Version : Cop-killer Is Media's Latest Baby Seal



txradioguy
09-22-2011, 05:23 AM
For decades, liberals tried persuading Americans to abolish the death penalty, using their usual argument: hysterical sobbing.

Only when the media began lying about innocent people being executed did support for the death penalty begin to waver, falling from 80 percent to about 60 percent in a little more than a decade. (Silver lining: That's still more Americans than believe in man-made global warming.)

Fifty-nine percent of Americans now believe that an innocent man has been executed in the last five years. There is more credible evidence that space aliens have walked among us than that an innocent person has been executed in this country in the past 60 years, much less the past five years.

But unless members of the public are going to personally review trial transcripts in every death penalty case, they have no way of knowing the truth. The media certainly won't tell them.

It's nearly impossible to receive a death sentence these days -- unless you do something completely crazy like shoot a cop in full view of dozens of witnesses in a Burger King parking lot, only a few hours after shooting at a passing car while exiting a party.

That's what Troy Davis did in August 1989. Davis is the media's current baby seal of death row.

After a two-week trial with 34 witnesses for the state and six witnesses for the defense, the jury of seven blacks and five whites took less than two hours to convict Davis of Officer Mark MacPhail's murder, as well as various other crimes. Two days later, the jury sentenced Davis to death.

Now, a brisk 22 years after Davis murdered Officer MacPhail, his sentence will finally be administered this week -- barring any more of the legal shenanigans that have kept taxpayers on the hook for Davis' room and board for the past two decades.

(The average time on death row is 14 years. Then liberals turn around and triumphantly claim the death penalty doesn't have any noticeable deterrent effect. As the kids say: Duh.)

It has been claimed -- in The New York Times and Time magazine, for example -- that there was no "physical evidence" connecting Davis to the crimes that night.

Davis pulled out a gun and shot two strangers in public. What "physical evidence" were they expecting? No houses were broken into, no cars stolen, no rapes or fistfights accompanied the shootings. Where exactly would you look for DNA? And to prove what?

I suppose it would be nice if the shell casings from both shootings that night matched. Oh wait -- they did. That's "physical evidence."

It's true that the bulk of the evidence against Davis was eyewitness testimony. That tends to happen when you shoot someone in a busy Burger King parking lot.

Eyewitness testimony, like all evidence tending to show guilt, has gotten a bad name recently, but the "eyewitness" testimony in this case did not consist simply of strangers trying to distinguish one tall black man from another. For one thing, several of the eyewitnesses knew Davis personally.

The bulk of the eyewitness testimony established the following:

Two tall, young black men were harassing a vagrant in the Burger King parking lot, one in a yellow shirt and the other in a white Batman shirt. The one in the white shirt used a brown revolver to pistol-whip the vagrant. When a cop yelled at them to stop, the man in the white shirt ran, then wheeled around and shot the cop, walked over to his body and shot him again, smiling.

Some eyewitnesses described the shooter as wearing a white shirt, some said it was a white shirt with writing, and some identified it specifically as a white Batman shirt. Not one witness said the man in the yellow shirt pistol-whipped the vagrant or shot the cop.

Several of Davis' friends testified -- without recantation -- that he was the one in a white shirt. Several eyewitnesses, both acquaintances and strangers, specifically identified Davis as the one who shot Officer MacPhail.

Now the media claim that seven of the nine witnesses against Davis at trial have recanted.

First of all, the state presented 34 witnesses against Davis -- not nine -- which should give you some idea of how punctilious the media are about their facts in death penalty cases.

Among the witnesses who did not recant a word of their testimony against Davis were three members of the Air Force, who saw the shooting from their van in the Burger King drive-in lane. The airman who saw events clearly enough to positively identify Davis as the shooter explained on cross-examination, "You don't forget someone that stands over and shoots someone."

www.anncoulter.com

lacarnut
09-22-2011, 06:36 AM
Looks like there was overwhelming evidence of his guilt. I was on a rape and robbery case about 10 years ago. We had 3 blacks that had been picked. While we were waiting in a room for the last 2 to be picked, the blacks all stated that the evidence had to be there to convict. In less than 2 hours, we voted to convict. The evidence was there in this case and in the case of the cop killer. With that many blacks on the jury, they would not have voted to convict if there was a shred of doubt.

The cop killer deserved to die. Good riddance.

noonwitch
09-22-2011, 08:37 AM
The story I saw this morning neglected to mention shell casings.


I'm against the death penalty. I support life in prison without the possibility of parole for murder cases. I'm not saying this guy was guilty or innocent (I'm certainly not taking Ann Coulter's word for it that he's guilty), but now he's dead and if he was innocent, it's too late to do anything about it.

txradioguy
09-22-2011, 09:00 AM
I support life in prison without the possibility of parole for murder cases.

Yes because it's better to hosue and feed a murdering scumbag for decades after tax money wasing decade than actually mete out justice. :rolleyes:

Tipsycatlover
09-22-2011, 09:13 AM
There are those on death row that actually serve life sentences instead of execution. They die of natural causes long before the execution date.

Novaheart
09-22-2011, 10:00 AM
For some reason my mother decided to latch onto the Troy Davis case. I've never known her to be particularly anti-DP, but perhaps as she grows older and death seems closer and inevitable, the idea of a state conducted execution seems unacceptable to her.

I didn't bother to become an expert on the Troy Davis case. I simply noted that several courts had reviewed the case and none had reversed it. Somewhat more emotionally, I noted that just about every DP case seized upon by the activists has some components in common, to wit:

He has maintained his innocence from the start.

(Big deal, who wouldn't?)

Witnesses have recanted.

(Yes, and with a parade of political and community activists (not to mention thugs) working on you and chatting up your family members you might see some wisdom in recanting too. If the maid in New York recanted her accusations against the French finance minister, would these same people think she did so on her own after soul searching? If these witness have recanted, then either they were lying then or they are lying now. Which is it? Oh, the police coerced them.)

The accusation that the police coerced or manipulated eyewitnesses.

These are not proof of innocence. These are not indictments of findings of guilt. These are not disproof of evidence used in the original trials and which survived appeal after appeal.

But my mother wouldn't hear it. She had her mind made up. In a rare case of being close minded and childish, she didn't want to discuss it. She merely said, "You're probably right, you are so much more knowledgeable than I am." in that nasty backhand of hers which is amusing when you aren't on the receiving end of it.

Maybe we should stop executing people for awhile, just to see what the NAACP, the SPLC, the ALCU, and Amnesty International find to do with their time. To their credit, the Innocence Project works through the legal system. I don't think that they have actually proven anyone innocent, but DNA coming to court was bound to have some shakeout on old cases, and most of these men have served longer sentences than a slick guy with a good lawyer might. There is a certain lowered risk to most of the Innocence Project cases.

Novaheart
09-22-2011, 10:04 AM
Yes because it's better to hosue and feed a murdering scumbag for decades after tax money wasing decade than actually mete out justice. :rolleyes:

I'm not sure how it works, but I think the numbers say that a life sentence is cheaper than an execution. Of course, that's just if you are counting food clothing and shelter.

We also need to consider the guys who kill other inmates while in prison. How to we count that in the cost? Some guy goes to prison for stealing cars and gets a death sentence at the hands of a lifer because the prisons can't or won't protect the inmates from each other? How about the prison guard who gets HIV, Hepatitis, or some other chronic and possibly terminal illness because one of these scumbags is pitching a fit?

Maybe we need to consider a Devil's Island approach.

Tipsycatlover
09-22-2011, 10:29 AM
I don't know whether life sentences are cheaper than death penalty cases. There has never been a REAL examination of the costs.

Much of the costs in death penalty cases has to do with appeals. A death penalty inmate only gets ONE appeal as a matter of law. The rest of the appeals are filed by various inmate advocate agencies. Appeal after appeal. The state defends against the appeals and that's where the money comes in.

When you see the statistics of the costs involved in life sentences what you NEVER see are the costs expended by defending against the numerous lawsuits filed by the inmate. Inmates file writs, lawsuits and motions as a hobby. At any given moment a random inmate may have a dozen procedural actions going. If the convict is illiterate, there are dozens of jailhouse lawyers who are happy to help for a price. Inmates sue for everything and anything. If Lexis-Nexis is out for an hour, a dozen inmates will sue for denial of access to legal materials. They sue because they want more porn, because there isn't enough salsa with breakfast. Each and every one of these actions require state defense just like death penalty appeals do. We just never hear about those associated costs.

txradioguy
09-22-2011, 10:53 AM
I don't know whether life sentences are cheaper than death penalty cases. There has never been a REAL examination of the costs

Well let's see housing feeding and providing medical care and in some cases college degrees for someone for the next 30-40 years versus the cost of a steak dinner and the drug coctail used to kill the scumbag.

megimoo
09-22-2011, 11:18 AM
Looks like there was overwhelming evidence of his guilt. I was on a rape and robbery case about 10 years ago. We had 3 blacks that had been picked. While we were waiting in a room for the last 2 to be picked, the blacks all stated that the evidence had to be there to convict. In less than 2 hours, we voted to convict. The evidence was there in this case and in the case of the cop killer. With that many blacks on the jury, they would not have voted to convict if there was a shred of doubt.

The cop killer deserved to die. Good riddance.

Anyone who kills another,cop or not,in cold blood, has in my estimation,ceased to be a human being .
.......Once a life is taken in cold,dead blood something changes in a person and it's much easier to kill again ...

A murderer looses something in the act of murder..Call it a part of humanity, never to be regained...
....A murderer becomes.. other than,....less than ..human and therefore a danger to civilized society ......

Tipsycatlover
09-22-2011, 11:24 AM
Anyone who kills another,cop or not,in cold blood, has in my estimation,ceased to be a human being .
.......Once a life is taken in cold,dead blood something changes in a person and it's much easier to kill again ...

A murderer looses something in the act of murder..Call it a part of humanity, never to be regained...
....A murderer becomes.. other than,....less than ..human and therefore a danger to civilized society ......

In many people killing again becomes easy. In some people it's a rush and they enjoy it. Those individuals need to be put down as soon as possible.

Wei Wu Wei
09-22-2011, 02:01 PM
Why is killing someone supposed to be such a horrible sin, but at the same time you want to give the government the power to do exactly that?

Why is it when it comes to providing food assistance or medical care to poor children or the elderly, the government is a giant fumbling erroneous bureaucracy that is filled with mistakes and inefficiencies, but when it comes to executing someone, everyone here has so much faith in the government?

How much of this insatiable bloodlust is coming from self-professed Christians? You know who else was executed by the state after being convicted of a crime? That's right. Even Jesus Christ himself spoke to, and forgave criminals who were being executed along side him.

newshutr
09-22-2011, 02:09 PM
Waaaaaaaaahhh..cop killer dead..

Buh Bye..

Re-impose the death sentence for Mumia now..

noonwitch
09-22-2011, 02:33 PM
Yes because it's better to hosue and feed a murdering scumbag for decades after tax money wasing decade than actually mete out justice. :rolleyes:


I understand why people want the death penalty.


Yes, I do think it is better to house and feed a murderer for decades than for the government to murder him. I think depriving someone of their freedom for the rest of his life is a fair punishment for murder. I don't live in a death penalty state.

marv
09-22-2011, 02:51 PM
Taking life is not always "murder". It happens in wars all the time. It happens in self-defence. It's really about the justification.

On the other hand, were there any protestors at the execution of the white suppremacist (tried and convicted under George Bush, and executed under Rick Perry) who drug the black guy to his death behind a pickup?

Oh yes, Einstein said that everything is relative according to your particular point of view.........

Odysseus
09-22-2011, 04:42 PM
Why is killing someone supposed to be such a horrible sin, but at the same time you want to give the government the power to do exactly that?

It is not a sin to kill in self-defense. The execution of a murderer is part of the delegation of the right of self-defense to the state, which executes those who have demonstrated that they cannot be permitted to continue to draw breath because of their crimes. Those who try to blur the distinction between a murderer taking the life of an innocent victim and the state imposing a punishment for that seek to eliminate the concept of justice.


Why is it when it comes to providing food assistance or medical care to poor children or the elderly, the government is a giant fumbling erroneous bureaucracy that is filled with mistakes and inefficiencies, but when it comes to executing someone, everyone here has so much faith in the government?
When we argue against the expansion of government into areas for which it is not meant to go, we demonstrate its ineptitude in those specific areas. In the area of providing food assistance, medical care, welfare or most of the other programs that you support, the coercive nature of government prevents efficiency. As Washington said, government is not faith, or reason, but force, and the use of force as a tool of income redistribution is tyrannical. The use of force to protect the innocent and punish the guilty, however, is one of the basic reasons that government has the authority to use force.


How much of this insatiable bloodlust is coming from self-professed Christians? You know who else was executed by the state after being convicted of a crime? That's right. Even Jesus Christ himself spoke to, and forgave criminals who were being executed along side him.

Jesus forgave them for their sins, but did not absolve them of responsibility, nor did he state that they did not warrant their punishment. Regardless, I'm not bound by the Old Testament, and your desperation and hypocrisy is becoming comical.

newshutr
09-22-2011, 04:44 PM
Maybe they should've tried the baby seal method on the cop killer..

just sayin...

Madisonian
09-22-2011, 07:18 PM
Pros or cons of the DP aside*, what is often overlooked is that the vast majority, if not all, of these people executed have criminal pasts that put them in the position of being arrested and tried for the crime in the first place.
Long true story short, in my early 20's I knew some very bad and vicious people. 2 of them are serving triple life sentences for 1st degree murder. Another is serving life without parole for shooting a store manager during a robbery. Noonie probably knows which case I am talking about. In the 2nd instance, I had given this person and his accomplice a ride only a couple days earlier. We stopped at a party store for some beer, but they did not rob the place. Had it been a couple days later, I may have been the driver in the store murder.
Last year I testified in the trial that got him convicted (30 years after the crime).
I may not have been guilty of anything except bad judgement, but I was hardly innocent.
Point is that had I been the driver the night of the shooting, in some states I would have been as guilty as the shooter and if it was a DP state, just as executable. I put myself in that position, no one else did and would have only myself to blame.
So no, I have no sympathy for these people, regardless of how I feel about the DP.
It may sound trite, but you reap what you sow.

*Would rather see that instead of an execution, they do a 23 hour solitary lock down with the only furniture, other than a bed, be a short rope hanging from the ceiling and a tall chair.
20 to 50 years of that would probably eliminate the need.

Sonnabend
09-22-2011, 08:11 PM
How much of this insatiable bloodlust is coming from self-professed Christians? You know who else was executed by the state after being convicted of a crime? That's right. Even Jesus Christ himself spoke to, and forgave criminals who were being executed along side him.

"Render unto Caesar that which is Caesar's"..in other words, obey the law of the land. Give to God that which is God's, and give that which is Caesar's, to Caesar = pay taxes = obey the law.

I don't see a problem here.

fettpett
09-23-2011, 04:36 AM
Pros or cons of the DP aside*, what is often overlooked is that the vast majority, if not all, of these people executed have criminal pasts that put them in the position of being arrested and tried for the crime in the first place.
Long true story short, in my early 20's I knew some very bad and vicious people. 2 of them are serving triple life sentences for 1st degree murder. Another is serving life without parole for shooting a store manager during a robbery. Noonie probably knows which case I am talking about. In the 2nd instance, I had given this person and his accomplice a ride only a couple days earlier. We stopped at a party store for some beer, but they did not rob the place. Had it been a couple days later, I may have been the driver in the store murder.
Last year I testified in the trial that got him convicted (30 years after the crime).
I may not have been guilty of anything except bad judgement, but I was hardly innocent.
Point is that had I been the driver the night of the shooting, in some states I would have been as guilty as the shooter and if it was a DP state, just as executable. I put myself in that position, no one else did and would have only myself to blame.
So no, I have no sympathy for these people, regardless of how I feel about the DP.
It may sound trite, but you reap what you sow.

*Would rather see that instead of an execution, they do a 23 hour solitary lock down with the only furniture, other than a bed, be a short rope hanging from the ceiling and a tall chair.
20 to 50 years of that would probably eliminate the need.

sounds a lot like my brother in law, except he WAS driving when they robbed the place and ended up in prison for 10 years