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SaintLouieWoman
09-26-2011, 06:13 PM
Diet and Nutrition (http://www.everydayhealth.com/diet-nutrition/101.aspx)

Ask Charles Platkin, the Diet Detective
Are Organic Foods Really Better?

Q: These days, there's so much hype about eating organic foods. What are the benefits of an organic diet? Are these foods really worth the cost?

http://images.agoramedia.com/everydayhealth/gcms/bio_charles_platkin_sq.jpg A: And so the organic food debate continues! Many people in favor of certified organic foods (which contain little to no pesticide residues, antibiotics, or growth hormones) claim that they are more healthful and safer than foods grown in more conventional ways. And the truth is, if you want to reduce the pesticides and chemicals you and your family are exposed to, it makes sense to switch to organic (http://www.everydayhealth.com/diet-nutrition/101/food-safety/is-organic-better.aspx).
But you should first ask yourself if you prefer to err on the side of caution. Because of the lack of proof demonstrating that conventionally grown foods should be considered dangerous, some health experts aren't convinced that humans ingest enough agricultural chemicals from non-organic foods to threaten their health. Of course, just because we don't have all the evidence to explain the danger doesn't mean the danger isn't there. So eating organic food is certainly a way to play it safe.

The downside to choosing organic foods (http://www.everydayhealth.com/photogallery/How-to-Shop-Organic.aspx) is that doing so can be expensive. The average family of four might spend between 50 to 300 percent more to be completely organic. If you're on a tight budget, keep in mind that eating any fruits and vegetables is better than eating none at all.

If you do choose to go organic (or partially organic), use these cost-saving tips:

Prioritize purchases. Be selective about the organic foods you buy. According to an analysis by the USDA, the following foods (nicknamed the "dirty dozen") were found to contain the highest pesticide levels:

Apples
Bell peppers
Celery
Cherries
Grapes (imported varieties)
Nectarines
Peaches
Pears
Potatoes
Raspberries
Spinach
Strawberries
To see where your favorite fruits and vegetables rank in terms of pesticide loads, go to www.foodnews.org (http://www.foodnews.org), the Web site of the Environmental Working Group.
Search online for coupons. Many major organic brands (including Stonyfield Farm, Organic Valley, Earthbound Farm, and Health Valley) offer coupons on their Web sites.
Comparison shop. Shop at discount stores and compare prices for specific items. Large discount chains like Sam's Club, Costco, Walmart, and Target now carry organic products.
Join a food co-op. These independent grocery stores sell local and organic foods to members at a discount. Some have a membership fee; others may require members to volunteer at the co-op for a few hours each month. To find a co-op near you, go to www.localharvest.org/food-coops (http://www.localharvest.org/food-coops/) or www.coopdirectory.org (http://www.coopdirectory.org/).
A final note: Be sure to thoroughly wash all fruits and vegetables you buy, organic and non-organic alike. It's best to rinse produce for 30 seconds, soak for 15 seconds, and then rinse a final time.
Learn more in the Everyday Health Diet and Nutrition Center (http://www.everydayhealth.com/diet-nutrition/101.aspx).



Last Updated: 11/16/2009

Novaheart
09-26-2011, 06:45 PM
I've seen similar articles. It's the new wave of common sense and meeting in the middle.

Basically, the idea is that anything which you are going to peel, you don't have to spend organic money on. No point in paying twice as much for avocados or bananas.

Now while the health food store is now a budget item for me, I am not a devotee of spending money I don't have to spend. I am not a Vegan nor am I a political health food freak. I'm just trying to do what's right for me. And I like organic bananas better. I also like Thai bananas and god know what they spray on them.

I paid $1.42 for one organic apple yesterday, and it simply wasn't worth the extra money. I had bought a similar apple at Save A Lot and it was delicious for half the price.

I will say this categorically: Organic breads from the health food store are better than any of the breads sold in the grocery store and well worth the extra buck or three. I can't understand why Sweetbay and Publix carry all those new organics in some departments, but only offer the same old brands of bread.

SaintLouieWoman
09-26-2011, 07:42 PM
I've seen similar articles. It's the new wave of common sense and meeting in the middle.

Basically, the idea is that anything which you are going to peel, you don't have to spend organic money on. No point in paying twice as much for avocados or bananas.

Now while the health food store is now a budget item for me, I am not a devotee of spending money I don't have to spend. I am not a Vegan nor am I a political health food freak. I'm just trying to do what's right for me. And I like organic bananas better. I also like Thai bananas and god know what they spray on them.

I paid $1.42 for one organic apple yesterday, and it simply wasn't worth the extra money. I had bought a similar apple at Save A Lot and it was delicious for half the price.

I will say this categorically: Organic breads from the health food store are better than any of the breads sold in the grocery store and well worth the extra buck or three. I can't understand why Sweetbay and Publix carry all those new organics in some departments, but only offer the same old brands of bread.

The breads here just aren't as good as elsewhere. The Whole Foods in St Louis baked their own bread. The stuff at Whole Foods in Sarasota (a much smaller store) is something brought in and not as fresh. I have a tough time finding good whole grain breads.

I agree that it isn't worth paying for organic for stuff that has to be peeled. I'll admit that somehow the organic potatoes tht I used to get somehow tasted better. I don't notice the difference so much with some other products.

It's probably a matter of getting local produce, which is fresher. The tomatoes and avacados that I get at the local Amish places are delicious. I wash the tomatoes very thoroughly.

Since eating so many veggies, admit that I feel so much better. My health #'s are improving, too. And also not a vegan or vegetarian.

Rockntractor
09-26-2011, 08:01 PM
The breads here just aren't as good as elsewhere. The Whole Foods in St Louis baked their own bread. The stuff at Whole Foods in Sarasota (a much smaller store) is something brought in and not as fresh. I have a tough time finding good whole grain breads.

I agree that it isn't worth paying for organic for stuff that has to be peeled. I'll admit that somehow the organic potatoes tht I used to get somehow tasted better. I don't notice the difference so much with some other products.

It's probably a matter of getting local produce, which is fresher. The tomatoes and avacados that I get at the local Amish places are delicious. I wash the tomatoes very thoroughly.

Since eating so many veggies, admit that I feel so much better. My health #'s are improving, too. And also not a vegan or vegetarian.

We grind our own wheat and amaranth to make bread, get with the program!:D

djones520
09-26-2011, 08:05 PM
Not according to the FDA.

I can only find stories from the British version of the FDA, but they stated back in 2009 that "organic" food had no greater nutritional value that other types.

Hawkgirl
09-26-2011, 08:46 PM
I've bought organic produce and fruits through the years, I didn't taste the difference...but the point is not taste, they supposedly use less pesticide and growth hormones....which means they have more bugs.:D


I do shop at Whole Foods now and then, especially when I am craving their hot food bar (I like their indian dishes)..and will pick up organic food every now and then.

When my daughter was younger, I fed her organic baby food....but now, she eats what we eat.

fettpett
09-26-2011, 09:29 PM
my wife has been working on an organic farm this summer (only 8hrs), getting a bushel of veggies for her efforts, which is pretty cool and the food is fantastic. They do taste better. the major reason why organic cost so much more is because to be able to use that label it cost around $17,000 and they have to adhere to a very VERY strict structure of what they can and can't grow and what they can and can't use for fertilization and pest control.

If you want to eat that way, find local producers that grow organically but don't have the label, you'll be surprised how much you can find that are that way.

Hawkgirl
09-26-2011, 09:32 PM
If you want to eat that way, find local producers that grow organically but don't have the label, you'll be surprised how much you can find that are that way.

Here in south Florida, I have about 3-4 local farmer's market that I go to...they don't list "organic" on their food, but it's picked and sold. Can't get fresher than that, unless you have your own garden.

fettpett
09-26-2011, 09:45 PM
I've bought organic produce and fruits through the years, I didn't taste the difference...but the point is not taste, they supposedly use less pesticide and growth hormones....which means they have more bugs.:D


I do shop at Whole Foods now and then, especially when I am craving their hot food bar (I like their indian dishes)..and will pick up organic food every now and then.

When my daughter was younger, I fed her organic baby food....but now, she eats what we eat.


Here in south Florida, I have about 3-4 local farmer's market that I go to...they don't list "organic" on their food, but it's picked and sold. Can't get fresher than that, unless you have your own garden.

true, but you can ask if they grow it organically, they can't call it organic if they don't have the certification at any level, whether it's farmer's market or grocery store

Hawkgirl
09-26-2011, 09:55 PM
true, but you can ask if they grow it organically, they can't call it organic if they don't have the certification at any level, whether it's farmer's market or grocery store

I don't think they have anything listed as "organic".....but it's fresher than buying at the supermarket. I peel everything, even peaches and nectarines, apples...etc.

fettpett
09-26-2011, 10:29 PM
I don't think they have anything listed as "organic".....but it's fresher than buying at the supermarket. I peel everything, even peaches and nectarines, apples...etc.

you are throwing away a lot of the nutrients by doing that

Novaheart
09-27-2011, 12:58 AM
Not according to the FDA.

I can only find stories from the British version of the FDA, but they stated back in 2009 that "organic" food had no greater nutritional value that other types.

A dear friend's sister is a devotee of Joel D. Wallach, DVM. She's not an idiot, but she firmly believes just about every bit of lore regarding health and food, including that foods grown in the US aren't as nutritious as they once were due to soil depletion.

If you can believe it, I don't argue with her, I just listen. Unfortunately, coupled with her belief that you can cure everything with magic water from a mine in Utah or more kindly a balance of essential minerals, is her belief that medical doctors are full of crap and kill people. In my case, if I were to take some of the stuff she has recommended, I would probably OD on potassium alone.

Wei Wu Wei
09-27-2011, 02:42 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzcfsq1_bt8

very nice analysis of "eco-friendly" consumerism and why liberals like to buy organic and shop at starbucks

Novaheart
09-27-2011, 10:53 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzcfsq1_bt8

very nice analysis of "eco-friendly" consumerism and why liberals like to buy organic and shop at starbucks


His appearance notwithstanding, the delivery is wonderful. I'm not sure it would be the same without the accent.

"Your altruistic blah blah blah..... it's included vith de prrrrice."

Molon Labe
09-27-2011, 02:18 PM
very nice analysis of "eco-friendly" consumerism and why liberals like to buy organic and shop at starbucks

I get really tired of Slavy Baby trying to compare a corporate craphole like a Starbucks to people who produce organic foods.

Organic food prices are expensive because of corporate monopoly on the food industry. Not because we need more socialism.
We don't have a true free market, therefore organic foods are more expensive to produce and companies like Tyson and Perdue can corner the market in their respective food industry.

Want to have cheaper more organically grown food? Open it to competition locally and don't sock it to local farmers by subsidizing the big guys. Of course this would all mean that in certain areas of the country you're not going to get blueberries and out of season foods.

No we don't buy it because we are trying to "do something". We 've done our homework and know it can be more conducive to a healthy lifestyle.

Novaheart
09-27-2011, 02:50 PM
I get really tired of Slavy Baby trying to compare a corporate craphole like a Starbucks to people who produce organic foods.

Organic food prices are expensive because of corporate monopoly on the food industry. Not because we need more socialism.
We don't have a true free market, therefore organic foods are more expensive to produce and companies like Tyson and Perdue can corner the market in their respective food industry.

Want to have cheaper more organically grown food? Open it to competition locally and don't sock it to local farmers by subsidizing the big guys. Of course this would all mean that in certain areas of the country you're not going to get blueberries and out of season foods.

No we don't buy it because we are trying to "do something". We 've done our homework and know it can be more conducive to a healthy lifestyle.

I have never delved into the politics or economics of organic farming and food production. I always assumed that they were more expensive for two reasons:

ConAgra controls millions of acres of land for industrial farming while Joey Flaxseed grows organic oranges and tomatoes on 30 acres in Ocala with no pesticides, higher waster, and less economy of scale.

The health food store is owned by people who talk like hippies and gouge like mafiosi.

I didn't take the subsidies into consideration. I'm guessing a person could get a degree in the ins and outs of industrial versus organic farming.


Something which does concern me is the alleged effort of ConAgra and Walmart to subvert the meanings of the labels of "organic" and other healthful claims. They already label crap as "smart choice" or "healthy alternative" which no nutritionist of any stripe would consider smart or healthy unless we're comparing everything to a Big Mac.

Molon Labe
09-27-2011, 03:25 PM
The health food store is owned by people who talk like hippies and gouge like mafiosi.

local natural food coops do not gouge prices because they are all ruthless capitalists. Most of them don't agree with me on anything concerning current events and philosophy.

Most of them don't even understand the link to government goodies, corporate welfare, and how it hurts their operation. Some of the higher costs are caused by the fact that people still do most of the workload and it isn't automated, but it's impossible to get them to make the connection to regulations on their own local production of food as to why their tomatoes might be a dollar more a pound than Big box marts

fettpett
09-27-2011, 05:31 PM
While those things MIGHT be part of the precieved view of the price of organic veggies, but it's the $17,000 cost of the Certification that drives the prices up. the people my wife works for can't afford that, nor can 90% of small farms that grow organically but can't use the label because of the cost issue

Space Gravy
09-27-2011, 06:37 PM
Ever notice the sell by date on organic milk? It's like a month longer than the regular.

Novaheart
09-28-2011, 09:53 AM
While those things MIGHT be part of the precieved view of the price of organic veggies, but it's the $17,000 cost of the Certification that drives the prices up. the people my wife works for can't afford that, nor can 90% of small farms that grow organically but can't use the label because of the cost issue

I've always had a problem with the certification thing.

ConAgra and Walmart are going to render "organic" meaningless , if it isn't already, anyway, so organic or less-toxic farmers should come up with their own word, trademark it, and then they can decide who gets to use it based on a reasonable criteria and without fee. Or they can simply label it: Joe Flaxseed Oranges, grown responsible and unwilling to pay the "Organic" tax."

Some people, granted not very nice people, have called the Kosher certification a tax. I would imagine that there are people who make kosher foods who aren't willing to pay to have the Kosher or Pareve symbols on their packaging.

marv
09-28-2011, 11:31 AM
Want organic? Try some cantaloupe from Colorado........http://www.conservativeunderground.com/forum505/images/smilies/rolleyes.gif

I'll stick with the pesticides and other bad-thingy killers.........http://www.conservativeunderground.com/forum505/images/smilies/wink.gif