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View Full Version : Fremont Girl Banned From Wearing Rosary At School



Rockntractor
10-03-2011, 05:41 PM
District Says Church Symbol Being Used By Gangs

POSTED: 9:46 pm CDT October 2, 2011
UPDATED: 8:17 am CDT October 3, 2011
church said something that should be a symbol of love has been adopted and abused by gang influences.

A sixth-grade girl said she was told that she can't wear a necklace that resembles a rosary because it violates the dress code at the Fremont Public Schools.

Elizabeth Carey, 12, said the school adopted a policy last year banning the necklaces.

"The principal said I couldn't wear my necklace at all because gangsters were wearing it," she said.

She said the necklace is part of an outfit that she hopes expresses her faith.

"I'm wearing a cross necklace, a cross T-shirt and a cross bracelet," she said. "I'm thinking of how Jesus died on the cross and how he gave up all his sins for us."

Superintendent Steve Sexton said the policy is for student safety.



"We had information from law enforcement that there were documented instances of gang activity in the area and we had information that states that the rosary was being used as a symbol of gang affiliation," Sexton said.

He said rosaries have been used as gang-identification symbols in Oregon, Arizona and Texas.

Omaha Catholic Archdiocese Chancellor Rev. Joseph Taphorn said it's disheartening.

"I don't think Christians should have to forfeit what is the symbol for the love of Christ because a few people want to misuse that symbol," he said.

He said the corruption of something as beloved as the rosary disgusts the church.

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"One ought to be able to figure out whether she's trying to promote a gang," Taphorn said. "If she's not, why would she be punished for her right of religious freedom and religious expression?"

Carey said she doesn't even know what a gang is. She said it makes her upset that she was punished for wearing what she thought was a necklace.

"It makes me feel like I want to scream really bad," she said.

Her parents also said they were upset that their daughter was being kept from expressing her religious beliefs.

Carey said she will continue to make a statement with her wardrobe through cross necklaces and shirts.

"I'm deciding to stand up for Jesus and do whatever I can to stop this," she said.

Fremont Public Schools said the district has no problem with students wearing jewelry or clothing to express their faith, but rosaries are an exception.
http://www.ketv.com/r/29367988/detail.html#ixzz1ZkMO7sse
Arrest the gang members for hate crimes

noonwitch
10-04-2011, 03:22 PM
I'm not a catholic, but isn't it considered disrespectful to wear the rosary as a necklace? She still gets to wear her shirt with the cross on it, so I think the school is not discriminating against religious symbols in general.


Gangs, especially latino gangs, wear rosaries as necklaces. So do the goth kids.

linda22003
10-04-2011, 03:56 PM
Yes - rosaries are NOT jewelry.

Novaheart
10-04-2011, 04:43 PM
The simple solution would seem to be a uniform with no jewelry at all.

But if we do that, then how long will it be before the gangs adopt the public school uniform?

Let the little girl wear the rosary if she wants to. If gangs are a problem in the school, then do something about it. Trying to eliminate gangs by dress codes seems to generate more animosity in the general public than it does anything resembling discipline.

That being said, I do support mandatory school uniforms for other reasons.

NJCardFan
10-04-2011, 08:11 PM
OK, then the kids can't wear Oakland Raiders stuff, Boston Red Sox hats(Bloods), Colorado Rockies hats(Crips).

noonwitch
10-05-2011, 10:18 AM
OK, then the kids can't wear Oakland Raiders stuff, Boston Red Sox hats(Bloods), Colorado Rockies hats(Crips).


They can't in Detroit Public Schools. They now have uniforms, and the parents are thrilled. The kids hate it, though.

Back in the 90s, when I worked Delinquency, the gangs used team logos and colors for their identification. The Latin Counts wore Chicago Bulls (red/black) shirts and jackets, the Cobras wore Celtic things, and so on. I haven't worked in that program, so my gang knowledge is not current.

Interestingly enough, one of the local high schools' (Kettering) traditional color is the one I call "Crip Blue". So the school shirts and athletic uniforms, totally by accident and the cluelessness of teachers/administrators, reflect the gang that rules that particular area. The color, though, has been that school's color since the 60s, long before the east side Crips came along.

Tipsycatlover
10-05-2011, 12:13 PM
It's not preventing her from expressing her faith. It's an admission that the school has lost control of the students and the gangs are in charge.

Elspeth
10-05-2011, 02:25 PM
It's not preventing her from expressing her faith. It's an admission that the school has lost control of the students and the gangs are in charge.

It's an admission that the neighborhood and the cops have lost control and that the gangs are in charge of everything, including the schools. Gangs are a cancer and a curse, and they live off the drugging of American teenagers. They destroy everything in their path.

Tipsycatlover
10-05-2011, 06:11 PM
The fact is, the gangs are so violent, so barbaric and the left so sympathetic and feeling, that the gangs have control just about everyplace they are.

Elspeth
10-05-2011, 06:22 PM
The fact is, the gangs are so violent, so barbaric and the left so sympathetic and feeling, that the gangs have control just about everyplace they are.

I often wondered with our War on Drugs why these gangs have been allowed to continue doing their business. Trillions have gone to that war and the gangs have slowly eroded formerly livable inner city neighborhoods. That's not just politics: something is really wrong with the War on Drugs.

Tipsycatlover
10-06-2011, 11:17 AM
That's because it's not a war of any kind. It's more like an Accommodation on Drugs.

There's rehab, community service, counseling, medication, diversion programs to avoid jail time. There's little actual punishment. More like a temporary interference.

When you see all these people locked up for so-called "drug offenses" they have committed other crimes and that's why they are in jail or prison. In their minds, it's only for a drug charge, they forget all about that family of five they killed when driving under the influence. They forget that they forgot and left the baby in the bathtub until it drowned.

Not to mention that the police do not want to take on the gangs. The gangs have then out numbered and outgunned. It wouldn't be a contest.

noonwitch
10-06-2011, 12:10 PM
I often wondered with our War on Drugs why these gangs have been allowed to continue doing their business. Trillions have gone to that war and the gangs have slowly eroded formerly livable inner city neighborhoods. That's not just politics: something is really wrong with the War on Drugs.



Part of the problem with the inner city drug trade is the use of juveniles to sell and transport the actual drugs. Kids get charged as juvies for drug crimes, only for "violent" crimes are they charged as adults. The people behind the drug sales know this and exploit it.


Because drugs are illegal, yet the demand continues to be high, there will always be people willing to risk everything for the kind of money involved. I'm not for legalizing all drugs, though, having seen the damage up close caused by cocaine and heroin (meth is not a huge problem in Detroit at this point). The War On Drugs hasn't worked, and probably won't work ever because of the high demand and the profits that can be made.

RobJohnson
10-19-2011, 02:31 AM
It's not preventing her from expressing her faith. It's an admission that the school has lost control of the students and the gangs are in charge.

Well said & our tax dollars pay for this?

Tipsycatlover
10-19-2011, 09:04 AM
Part of the problem with the inner city drug trade is the use of juveniles to sell and transport the actual drugs. Kids get charged as juvies for drug crimes, only for "violent" crimes are they charged as adults. The people behind the drug sales know this and exploit it.


Because drugs are illegal, yet the demand continues to be high, there will always be people willing to risk everything for the kind of money involved. I'm not for legalizing all drugs, though, having seen the damage up close caused by cocaine and heroin (meth is not a huge problem in Detroit at this point). The War On Drugs hasn't worked, and probably won't work ever because of the high demand and the profits that can be made.

You are completely not understanding the violence, what causes it and where it comes from. The drug dealers have a basic pass from the authorities. There are NO shootouts between the cops and drug dealers. If a dealer is caught, it's by accident. The major shootouts, the drive bys, those are drug dealers and addicts fighting one another.

The violence is between rival drug dealers fighting over market share. That's why no medical marijuana outlets are in gang controlled territory. It's not safe for them to be there. The violence in mexico isn't because the government is trying to stop illegal sales, it's rival dealers fighting over customers and killing one another's customers.

The problem isn't really whether or not drugs should be legalized. The problem is really how we came to be a nation where so many of it's people can't get through the day unless they are high. This is a failed state. It is a state the has lost its ability to motivate its people. That's where the problem is and legalizing drugs isn't going to help. If legalizing drugs can be kept peaceful, which is highly, HIGHLY, unlikely, the most likely outcome is an ever growing population of people who can't take care of themselves and require ever more.