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Novaheart
10-13-2011, 10:01 AM
I'm in charge of getting a new AC system in Mom's house. Thankfully, it waited until now to crap out. The Trane system being replaced was all new, including the lines/pipes/copper 12 years ago.

We're replacing a 2.5 ton unit, and our regular guy who now seems to be flaking on us, was going to replace "the copper" (which I call the pipes) between the outside and inside on the new install. For the same price as regular guy was quoting with "new copper" the others are not going to replace the lines, merely flush them before running the new fluid through them. The new quotes are from established companies on name brand systems, but the idea of not replacing the lines seems Mickey Mouse to me.

Thoughts? Experiences?

Ranger Rick
10-13-2011, 10:16 AM
It is pretty common on our condo units. They are 35 years old and are difficult to replace, as they run through the walls of the neighboring units. Pressure test them, if they pass, reuse them.

NJCardFan
10-13-2011, 10:20 AM
It is pretty common on our condo units. They are 35 years old and are difficult to replace, as they run through the walls of the neighboring units. Pressure test them, if they pass, reuse them.

This. Copper is pretty durable which is why it pays to have your home done with copper pipe. It doesn't degrade so unless the pipes are corroded, keep the old stuff and save yourself a little money.

Novaheart
10-13-2011, 10:30 AM
It is pretty common on our condo units. They are 35 years old and are difficult to replace, as they run through the walls of the neighboring units. Pressure test them, if they pass, reuse them.


This. Copper is pretty durable which is why it pays to have your home done with copper pipe. It doesn't degrade so unless the pipes are corroded, keep the old stuff and save yourself a little money.

Thank you. Since the one quote included new copper and the guy who probably will get the job doesn't include new copper, then I'm going to try to get an extended warranty in the deal. Seem reasonable?

Starbuck
10-13-2011, 11:55 AM
These guys like to replace the copper because they KNOW the new copper has no contaminants, whereas the old copper MAY contain contaminants (debris or moisture) from the old system which may clog up the new.

I'm of the "new copper" school. As far as I know using the old copper does not affect the warranty.

I have used old copper because it was built into the foundation and have gotten away with it, but your technician knows the risk.

I am a licensed home inspector and a certified automotive AC technician. (Yeah. I know. I've got lots of certifications and licenses. I'm curious like that.:))

Novaheart
10-13-2011, 12:30 PM
These guys like to replace the copper because they KNOW the new copper has no contaminants, whereas the old copper MAY contain contaminants (debris or moisture) from the old system which may clog up the new.

I'm of the "new copper" school. As far as I know using the old copper does not affect the warranty.

I have used old copper because it was built into the foundation and have gotten away with it, but your technician knows the risk.

I am a licensed home inspector and a certified automotive AC technician. (Yeah. I know. I've got lots of certifications and licenses. I'm curious like that.:))

Thanks for the advice. Now we know who to bug with automotive questions as well :)

Nubs
10-13-2011, 01:06 PM
If you replace the copper, do not pay a disposal "fee". Better yet, take it to a scrap dealer yourself and make a few bucks.

noonwitch
10-13-2011, 03:20 PM
These guys like to replace the copper because they KNOW the new copper has no contaminants, whereas the old copper MAY contain contaminants (debris or moisture) from the old system which may clog up the new.

I'm of the "new copper" school. As far as I know using the old copper does not affect the warranty.

I have used old copper because it was built into the foundation and have gotten away with it, but your technician knows the risk.

I am a licensed home inspector and a certified automotive AC technician. (Yeah. I know. I've got lots of certifications and licenses. I'm curious like that.:))


I know nothing about it all, but when I replaced my central air in 2009, I replaced the whole system, copper pipes and all. The old unit was about 20 years old, so I figured that the technician/small business owner who installed mine was being honest that it was best to replace it all. The guy was in my circle of family and friends, though, so I trusted him.