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View Full Version : Occupy Philly is still there. (3 1/2 hours later)



Elspeth
11-27-2011, 09:28 PM
Apparently lots of silly speeches being repeated, but no one has been pushed off the premises yet. Anyone here from Philly?

Rockntractor
11-27-2011, 09:53 PM
As Occupy Philly’s 7 p.m. General Assembly formed in front of City Hall last night, paramount on everyone’s mind was the encampment’s imminent eviction.

“We plant the seed that one day will grow,” intoned a facilitator who kicked off the proceedings, as the others repeated the chant via “People’s Mic.”

But within moments the GA was disrupted by sign-carrying Occupier Michael Blas (pictured, in white T-shirt)—one of the movement’s higher-profile demonstrators (and whom many in attendance told PW has been a “troublemaker,” “agitator,” and “divisive person” over the past two months). For nearly 90 minutes Blas shouted his concerns about the rift between Occupy Philly and the homeless community that’s become part of the demonstration, and accused Occupy Philly of making off with donations meant for the homeless.

The scene was chaotic.

As Blas screamed and paced back and forth, the other 200 or so demonstrators on hand tried to drown him out with People’s Mic chants and songs. Many Occupiers tried to calm Blas down; others shouted at him to “fucking leave.” Some of Blas’ supporters, including several homeless people, demanded the group let Blas speak. “Mob mentality! Mob mentality!” Blas screamed. Several loud verbal skirmishes broke out among various protesters. There was some pushing and shoving. At one point Blas took a fist to the face. “What happened to the peaceful protest?” he yelled.

Several Occupiers told PW Blas’ accusations were baseless. “He just likes to hear himself yell,” said one man. “He’s ridiculous. He doesn’t represent Occupy Philly in any way.”

One Occupier brought out a bullhorn to try to reign in the chaos and continue the GA agenda. An older woman asked to speak—when she was given the bullhorn she started loudly singing Whitney Houston’s “The Greatest Love Of All.”

“You gotta be kidding me!” yelled one exasperated Occupier.

Finally, close to 8:30 p.m., a facilitator announced that the GA was moving to the Arch Street Methodist Church. The group walked over there (sans most of the GA’s homeless participants); so did the worked-up Blas, who continued screaming that he “would not be silenced.” But several demonstrators managed to distract him while the rest quickly filed into the church and locked the door behind them.

Calm and quiet was restored as for the next two hours the 150 people inside the church agreed on several proposals: Helping Occupy Philly’s homeless community relocate to Logan Circle ahead of today’s eviction. Meeting at Rittenhouse Square at 4 p.m. the day following the eviction (so, perhaps tomorrow) and then marching to PPD headquarters (aka the Roundhouse) at 8th and Arch to protest any arrests and hold a GA. And using the Friends Center as a site for future GAs.

There was no vote on whether or not Occupiers should leave ahead of the eviction or defy the order and risk arrest. It was clear that the decision will rest with each individual demonstrator, though it was suggested that those deciding to remain should sit down and lock arms in silent protest and maintain a non-violent stance.

At the end, one facilitator began to tear up. “Remember what solidarity is about,” she said. Others hugged, and some sang “Solidarity Forever” as they shuffled out into the night.

http://blogs.philadelphiaweekly.com/phillynow/2011/11/27/chaos-then-resolve-at-occupy-phillys-likely-final-dilworth-ga/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=chaos-then-resolve-at-occupy-phillys-likely-final-dilworth-ga

Elspeth
11-27-2011, 10:01 PM
A screaming homeless man and bad Whitney Houston?

It sounds like Saturday Night Live. :D

Elspeth
11-28-2011, 02:53 AM
It's almost 2 AM there and they have the bongos out. Neither the mayor nor the police came. I hope the authorities have a plan because it doesn't look like they are leaving any time soon.

LA is supposed to be dumped out soon too. Watch, they won't do it. And traffic will still be bad tomorrow.

Edited:
And they didn't.

I can only think that they have something else planned. They treated Occupy Philly and Occupy LA the same way: worked them up to a specific deadline and then didn't raid. Looks like the same strategy. My guess is an early morning raid for each of them sometime this week.

SarasotaRepub
11-28-2011, 09:12 AM
Cops are on the scene at LA...

http://www.ustream.tv/occupyoakland


:rolleyes:

Elspeth
11-28-2011, 04:16 PM
Good Morning.

They're still there in LA and Philly:

Occupy L.A. protesters to seek court order to block eviction (http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2011/11/occupy-la-court-order-eviction.html)

Occupiers defy deadline, quiet reigns at Dilworth (http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20111128_Occupy_protesters_remain_in_defiance_of_o rder.html)


At least in Philly it gets cold.

JB
11-28-2011, 07:22 PM
Apparently lots of silly speeches being repeated, but no one has been pushed off the premises yet. Anyone here from Philly?They cut the electricity off to Occupy Philly.

The deadline did come and go yesterday and I was a bit upset that the city had done nothing. You can't lay down an ultimatum and then back away from it. It weakens your position going forward and emboldens the enemy.

That said however, the mayor of Philly was in Chicago and not coming back until today (Monday) so that probably explains why no action was taken on Sunday night (him being out of town and such). We'll see if he has the balls now to back up what he says.

Elspeth
11-28-2011, 08:58 PM
They cut the electricity off to Occupy Philly.

The deadline did come and go yesterday and I was a bit upset that the city had done nothing. You can't lay down an ultimatum and then back away from it. It weakens your position going forward and emboldens the enemy.

That said however, the mayor of Philly was in Chicago and not coming back until today (Monday) so that probably explains why no action was taken on Sunday night (him being out of town and such). We'll see if he has the balls now to back up what he says.

I think the time has come to take really serious measures. It's gone on long enough. In LA, it's really bad and Tony Villar is such a piece of crap that he let them walk all over him. Lots of sound and fury that night, but nothing but 4 arrests. Hell, more people were arrested and injured in Wal Marts on Black Friday.

BTW, I was reading your paper at Philly.com and ran across an article that Phila. police actually invented the term Black Friday in the 1950s:

‘Black Friday’ started in Philly (http://www.philly.com/philly/news/breaking/20111125_Black_Friday_started_in_Philly.html)

Bailey
11-28-2011, 09:53 PM
They cut the electricity off to Occupy Philly.

The deadline did come and go yesterday and I was a bit upset that the city had done nothing. You can't lay down an ultimatum and then back away from it. It weakens your position going forward and emboldens the enemy.

That said however, the mayor of Philly was in Chicago and not coming back until today (Monday) so that probably explains why no action was taken on Sunday night (him being out of town and such). We'll see if he has the balls now to back up what he says.

I'm disappointed, this coming from the city that dropped a bomb on the MOVE house. I wouldn't mind them repeating that feet again. :D

Elspeth
11-28-2011, 09:55 PM
I'm disappointed, this coming from the city that dropped a bomb on the MOVE house. I wouldn't mind them repeating that feet again. :D

They dropped a BOMB??:confused:

SarasotaRepub
11-28-2011, 10:18 PM
They dropped a BOMB??:confused:

It was just a widdle one. :D


God these cities are run by a bunch of pussies!!! I was watching a "Feed" from LA today and these jerkoffs doing the live streaming are just begging to have their heads broken by the cops. I wouldn't blame them for a second.

Elspeth
11-28-2011, 11:07 PM
What kind of bomb?

Zathras
11-28-2011, 11:56 PM
What kind of bomb?

Here's the incident in question....


In 1981, MOVE relocated to a row house at 6221 Osage Avenue in the Cobbs Creek area of West Philadelphia. On May 13, 1985, responding to months of complaints by neighbors that MOVE members broadcast political messages by bullhorn at all hours and also about the health hazards posed by the piles of compost, as well as indictments of various MOVE members for various crimes, including parole violation, contempt of court, illegal possession of firearms, and making terrorist threats the police department attempted to clear the building and arrest the indicted MOVE members, which lead to an armed standoff with police. The police lobbed tear gas canisters at the building and the fire department battered the roof of the house with two water cannons. MOVE members fired on the police, and the police responded by returning fire. A police helicopter then dropped a four-pound bomb made of C-4 plastic explosive and Tovex, a dynamite substitute, onto the roof of the house.

The resulting explosion caused incendiary materials listed in the police indictment, and stored by MOVE in the house, to catch fire, thus causing the house to catch fire. The resulting fire ignited a massive blaze which eventually destroyed 65 houses. Eleven people, including John Africa, five other adults and five children, died in the resulting fire. The firefighters were stopped from putting out the fire based on allegations that firefighters were being shot at, a claim that was contested by the lone adult survivor Ramona Africa, who says that the firefighters had earlier battered the house with two deluge pumps when there was no fire. Ramona Africa and one child, Birdie Africa, were the only survivors.

Aftermath

Mayor W. Wilson Goode soon appointed an investigative commission called the PSIC or MOVE commission. It issued its report on March 6, 1986. The report denounced the actions of the city government, stating that "Dropping a bomb on an occupied row house was unconscionable." No one from the city government was charged criminally.

In a 1996 civil suit in US federal court, a jury ordered the City of Philadelphia to pay $1.5 million to a survivor and relatives of two people killed in the incident. The jury found that the city used excessive force and violated the members' constitutional protection against unreasonable search and seizure. Philadelphia was given the sobriquet "The City that Bombed Itself."

On the 25th Anniversary of the 1985 Police bombing, the Philadelphia Inquirer created a detailed multimedia site containing retrospective articles, archived articles, videos, interviews, photos, and a timeline of the events.

LINK (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOVE)

Elspeth
11-29-2011, 12:06 AM
Oh Lordy, the neighbors from hell. Really hell. An armed Occupy. I am surprised that they dropped a bomb, though. Wasn't there any other way to get these guys out?

Did that $1.5 million go to the MOVE people or to innocent people from the neighborhood?

Edited to add:

From wiki:

"MOVE made compost piles of garbage and human waste in their yards which attracted rats and cockroaches; they considered it morally wrong to kill the vermin with pest control."

OMG!:eek:


And:

"In 1981, MOVE relocated to a row house at 6221 Osage Avenue in the Cobbs Creek area of West Philadelphia. "

The police dropped a bomb on a bunch of row houses? What did they think would happen?

What about the innocent people in the other houses?

Rockntractor
11-29-2011, 01:49 AM
The main point of conversation at tonight’s General Assembly was what we’ll call “After Occupy.” Demonstrators seemed mostly concerned with what happens as soon as what most believe is an inevitable police sweep-through of Dilworth Plaza, whether it happens tonight or tomorrow or next week. Police presence had died down some since earlier today, as had the number of protesters on site. Donations of pizza and bottled water were on hand and most around me indulged.

Here’s the topics discussed at the GA:

• The American Electoral process (it sucks) and what to do about it (boycott elections).
• Ask unions to provide Occupy Philly some office space for the protesters assuming they get moved out.
• Are they getting moved out? Some protesters believe the police are waiting for them to get bored of occupying and move out on their own—which makes sense, if you look at pure numbers of people now compared to any time before now.
• Perhaps the occupiers could ask the city for a permit in another spot? Thomas Paine Plaza perhaps isn’t the be-all, end-all of protest locations.
• One Occupier said the group should move to the Divine Lorraine, as it is a symbol of Philadelphia’s blight. (note: the Divine Lorraine is owned by a private company who would not likely be satisfied with that idea.)
• All politics and change is local; Occupy Philly should start occupying their own neighborhoods.

Before the GA ended, one member of the crowd suggested those in attendance stay and have a party—like they did last night. A drum circle began around 9 p.m. and everywhere you went, people talked about how Reasonable Solutions had “absolutely nothing” to do with Occupy Philly, since many on hand who perhaps hadn’t been back in a while said they’d heard Occupy Philly had agreed to a permit at Thomas Paine Plaza. Some even said moving to Thomas Paine Plaza was no longer an option, since an unaffiliated group already had a permit to move there during the day.

The Occupiers who’d began building a wooden fort toward the north end of City Hall have continued their structure. It’s currently two stories (in parts) and is lined with plastic so no pepper spray can get through. There’s a tent and what appeared to be a mattress inside and at least one person asleep, face up. (I know, a picture would be great, but it was too dark.)

Joe Piette of the Workers World Party’s Philadelphia branch asked me where all the police were at. I looked around. “I don’t know,” I said. He’d once been on a Mumia march, he said. And at one point the police disappeared all the sudden, and when they reappeared, everyone got knocked down and some arrested. I looked around again. That wasn’t happening here, now. At least not yet.

A homeless citizen asked me what the Occupiers were doing there. “Have you not been here lately?” I asked. She hadn’t. When I explained who they were and what they were doing, she asked why the mayor lets them stay. I didn’t have a real answer. I said it was complicated.
http://blogs.philadelphiaweekly.com/phillynow/2011/11/28/occupy-phillys-conversation-moves-to-post-dilworth/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=occupy-phillys-conversation-moves-to-post-dilworth

Rockntractor
11-29-2011, 01:55 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n_7T2UdMPA8&feature=related

Elspeth
11-29-2011, 02:41 AM
Oh Lordy Lordy....


• All politics and change is local; Occupy Philly should start occupying their own neighborhoods.

In this case, most of the group would have to leave for their college campuses outside the city. It is doubtful that very many of these folks actually live in the city proper.


Joe Piette of the Workers World Party’s Philadelphia branch asked me where all the police were at. I looked around. “I don’t know,” I said. He’d once been on a Mumia march, he said.

Free Mumia? Oh good God! And is that Workers World Party connected to the Working Families Party (an ACORN subsidiary)?

AmPat
11-29-2011, 10:53 AM
,,,,,,,,,It gets the hose again!
http://i43.tinypic.com/4t55rp.jpg

noonwitch
11-29-2011, 12:30 PM
Here's the incident in question....



LINK (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOVE)



I had totally forgotten that situation.

The protesters in Detroit were talking about occupying vacant buildings, of which there are plenty to choose from here. Now I know why that was making me so uneasy, although if they stick to occupying vacant single houses, then it probably wouldn't come to that and could end positively, if they decided to purchase (or make a deal with a desperate city government) and rehab the houses. The problem would be if they took over a whole block, or a large abandoned apartment building or factory complex, of which there are also many around here.

Bailey
11-29-2011, 12:47 PM
They dropped a BOMB??:confused:

I remember seeing them doing it on TV, it was great. :D

Now if they would drop an incendiary bomb on them that'll take care of the pests in the camp . :D

Adam Wood
11-29-2011, 01:30 PM
It's almost 2 AM there and they have the bongos out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvR6d08L3nc

Odysseus
11-29-2011, 05:45 PM
A screaming homeless man and bad Whitney Houston?

It sounds like Saturday Night Live. :D
SNL hasn't been that funny in years.

I had totally forgotten that situation.

The protesters in Detroit were talking about occupying vacant buildings, of which there are plenty to choose from here. Now I know why that was making me so uneasy, although if they stick to occupying vacant single houses, then it probably wouldn't come to that and could end positively, if they decided to purchase (or make a deal with a desperate city government) and rehab the houses. The problem would be if they took over a whole block, or a large abandoned apartment building or factory complex, of which there are also many around here.

Rehabing buildings is hard work, and these guys aren't exactly known for their work ethic. Purchasing the buildings and fixing them up also takes money, which they also don't have a lot of, or a lot of interest in earning. They'll happily squat in an abaondoned building, but anything beyond that is too much trouble for them.