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RedGrouse
12-01-2011, 07:10 PM
Black student sparks debate with Confederate flag
http://www.chron.com/news/article/Black-student-sparks-debate-with-Confederate-flag-2338169.php


COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) A black college student who drew complaints for displaying a Confederate flag in his dorm room window said he sees the banner as a symbol of Southern pride and not racism.

The 19-year-old student at the University of South Carolina Beaufort took the flag down at the university's request, but he said he's considering putting it back up after the officials relented. Byron Thomas has drawn nearly 70,000 views since he posted a video online in which he acknowledges: "I know it's kind of weird because I'm black."

Adam Wood
12-01-2011, 07:24 PM
Well, that certainly has to have the libs in a quandary! :lol:

CueSi
12-01-2011, 11:02 PM
I heart him. :D I have a pair of panties with the Confederate flag on them that I got as a gag gift from a former girlfriend. I would wear 'em, but... eh. :p

~QC

Starbuck
12-01-2011, 11:03 PM
Visiting a black friend this week, I noticed his mother had recently put up a picture of underground railroad activities. A painting.
I asked her if she knew much about the underground railroad, and she said she did know a little. Then I asked her if she knew the story of The Drinking Gourd. She didn't.
So I sang a little of the song to her and explained how it worked for the slaves as they made their way north. She laughed in delight at the notion that I, a white man, had been able to teach her something about 'her own history'. I took pride in reminding her that, when you think about it, it is my history, too.
The story of The Drinking Gourd is part history and part folklore, but which is which is only important to historians. The important point is that it shows how the slaves were able to communicate directions to each other even though they, by law, were prohibited from becoming literate.
http://www.followthedrinkinggourd.org/index.htm

If I can be fascinated by the story of The Drinking Gourd, then a black student can become interested in the Confederate flag. It'll be OK.:)

noonwitch
12-02-2011, 10:10 AM
Maybe I'm an eternal optimist, but I think it's probably a good sign that a 19 year old black kid is not bothered by the confederate flag.

It's a symbol that I personally think does represent the confederacy and slavery, but maybe if a young kid doesn't see it that way, it means people are moving on.

Adam Wood
12-02-2011, 11:18 AM
Maybe I'm an eternal optimist, but I think it's probably a good sign that a 19 year old black kid is not bothered by the confederate flag.

It's a symbol that I personally think does represent the confederacy and slavery, but maybe if a young kid doesn't see it that way, it means people are moving on.Well, you're half right. It's a symbol that represents the Confederacy. It has nothing to do with slavery.

Novaheart
12-02-2011, 11:59 AM
Anyone who has been a poster on DU (and to some extent CU) knows that there is social pressure to be offended by that which violates doctrine.

I don't object to that which I consider legitimate offense. Of course, the DU folks maintain that I don't have a right to decide what is offensive to black people or anyone else I guess. So if Americans of Veitnamese ancestry collectively decide that Cheez Whiz is offensive for its similarity to napalm, then I suppose we're all supposed to stop eating or mentioning Cheez Whiz.

At some point, someone decided that the Confederate flag was intrinsically offensive. I am going to lay this one on black people because frankly the white people who bandwagon on this kind of shit are irrelevant. With the rise of Afrocentrism and its flexible regard for fact, I think that some black people decided that they could simply bully history and culture in ways designed to keep white people off balance (especially school teachers) and create a space for some arbitrary "power" in lieu of actual power. To their credit, some black academics and leaders called this one early on, saying that there was only so much bullshit that society could tolerate.

My personal experience is that a lot of black people would rather the civil war and slavery not be discussed. They want to hold it as an injury and injustice bargaining chip, but they don't want to feel uncomfortable. I remember in my suburban Maryland classroom, watching the black kids zone out and doodle in their notebooks when slavery was discussed. We're not talking about something that happened 3500 years ago, like (those who would become the Hebrews) in Egypt, we're talking about the great great grandparents of people my age. We're talking about people who were photographed, and some of whom lived into the 1960's.

The politics and militant attitude unfortunately does not create a space for meaningful growth, in which black people can become as comfortable about who they are as white people are, even if most white people also have an ignominious past. Our ancestors who were peons are an amusement to us, because most of us also have ancestors who were not peons. We have that cultural foundation. The insidious artifact of slavery is that it robbed black people of specific knowledge of their place in the world. Most of them don't come from cultures which would have kept the kinds of records Europeans did, but that doesn't mean that there wouldn't be a huge value in being able to say, "My ancestors come from a village called X in what is now Y."

obx
12-02-2011, 03:05 PM
I am very proud of my family's Confederate history. None owned slaves and most fought against the invaders. Not all signed the oath at the end of the war. I will not put my flag away just because someone is offended. That is their problem, not mine.