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View Full Version : Haley Barbour pardons nearly 200, including killers, in final days as Mississippi gov



Lanie
01-11-2012, 01:28 PM
JACKSON, Miss. — In his final days as Mississippi governor, Republican Haley Barbour gave pardons or early release to nearly 200 people, including more than two dozen whose crimes were listed as murder, manslaughter or homicide.

State records released Tuesday show some of the convicted killers were pardoned, while others were given medical or conditional releases. Barbour had released five other convicted killers in 2008. One of them had been granted a conditional release and was pardoned this time.

inShare..Relatives of crime victims had voiced outrage Monday after it was revealed that Barbour had pardoned four convicted murderers. Those men had worked at the Governor’s Mansion as part of a prison trusty program.

snip

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/apnewsbreak-new-records-show-outgoing-miss-gov-barbour-pardoned-dozens-including-killers/2012/01/10/gIQA3sl1oP_story.html?tid=pm_national_pop

Lanie
01-11-2012, 01:29 PM
I thought Republicans believed in being tough on crime. I can't help but think somebody blackmailed him or something.

On another note, the photo message said he wants to run for President? Crap.

Adam Wood
01-11-2012, 03:36 PM
I thought Republicans believed in being tough on crime. I can't help but think somebody blackmailed him or something. I think he just flipped his lid.


On another note, the photo message said he wants to run for President? Crap.Wanted. Past tense. Or more specifically, considered getting into the race. He announced that he wasn't running back in about March of last year, I believe.

JB
01-11-2012, 04:56 PM
I thought Republicans believed in being tough on crime.We do.
I can't help but think somebody blackmailed him or something.If you think he was blackmailed then why the prefatory statement implying Republicans are soft on crime?

Starbuck
01-11-2012, 05:28 PM
Lanie ought to read a little about exactly who got pardoned. Barbour won't discuss it.

Some of the pardoned have already died, many are out of prison, some have already served long sentences. But it makes better headlines to say, "SOME HAVE EVEN BEEN CONVICTED OF MURDER!"

Adam Wood
01-11-2012, 05:51 PM
Lanie ought to read a little about exactly who got pardoned. Barbour won't discuss it.

Some of the pardoned have already died, many are out of prison, some have already served long sentences. But it makes better headlines to say, "SOME HAVE EVEN BEEN CONVICTED OF MURDER!"I've looked at several articles regarding this over the last couple of days and I have not seen this mentioned anywhere, either in the local reports or the national media. Do you have a link for this?

Starbuck
01-11-2012, 11:01 PM
I've looked at several articles regarding this over the last couple of days and I have not seen this mentioned anywhere, either in the local reports or the national media. Do you have a link for this?
You have to peruse the names yourself; the press just figures you're going to read the headlines and fall in step. Here's one:
1) Kirby Tate got 60 years in 2003 for selling marijuana to an undercover wire-wearer as a habitual offender, two prior offenses, both related to sale of marijuana less than an ounce. He was holding about 36 lbs. Here's a link to the proceedings: http://courts.ms.gov/Images/Opinions/CO24636.pdf

2) Booker T Barnes....who died in 2009

Here's another interesting case:
3) WHEREAS, Harry Russ Bostick was placed in the Drug Court Program beginning on or about March 4, 2011. His estimated release date from the Drug Court Program, assuming no sanctions, is March 4, 2013….
BUT
Trooper Ray Hall of the Mississippi Highway Patrol says Charity Smith, 18, of Okolona, died as a result of her injuries.

Smith was driving a Buick LeSabre and apparently tried to pull from a private drive onto Highway 278 when she pulled into the path of a 2010 Ford F-150, driven by Harry Bostick, 55, of Oxford. …

It was Bosticks third DUI, but look at the facts.....Someone pulled out in front of him.

And on it goes, but you'll have to do your own random search of the names, which are available many places. And when you do search you'll probably find the same information I saw.

Kay
01-11-2012, 11:18 PM
I've looked at several articles regarding this over the last couple of days and I have not seen this mentioned anywhere, either in the local reports or the national media. Do you have a link for this?

There were several convicted murders pardoned. The DA is livid and is giving scathing interviews on this being a slap in the face to his office, the victims and law enforcement. I saw one interview of a woman who's sister was murdered while holding her baby who was also murdered. The guy that did it was pardoned and now the family is worried he will try to finish the job and kill the rest of the family.

Just breaking, a Miss judge has just blocked 21 of the releases that are the most violent criminals.

Sounds like Barbour has either been blackmailed or demon possessed.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/01/11/mississippi-judge-blocks-release-21-inmates-given-pardons-by-governor-barbour/


Each of the five inmates released this past weekend had worked as a trusty at the Governor's Mansion. They are David Gatlin, convicted of killing his estranged wife in 1993; Joseph Ozment, convicted in 1994 of killing a man during a robbery; Anthony McCray, convicted in 2001 of killing his wife; Charles Hooker, sentenced to life in 1992 for murder; and Nathan Kern, sentenced to life in 1982 for burglary after at least two prior convictions.


And the above are already back on the street with full pardons!

Starbuck
01-11-2012, 11:37 PM
The DA is Jim Hood. He and Barbour have been at odds - and political enemies - since the beginning of time. I imagine he would do whatever he could to undermine Barbour.

Hood is an anomaly. The The House and The Senate have gone to the Republicans for the first time since 1875. Hood remains the lone powerful Democrat in a solidly Republican state. You'll do better if you do your own research.

I think some of this is way overblown. Look at your own quote:
Nathan Kern, sentenced to life in 1982 for burglary after at least two prior convictions.
30 years for burglary? And he's been a trusty. Why not release him; the system won't.

Kay
01-11-2012, 11:53 PM
What about the other 4 convicted murderers?

Starbuck
01-11-2012, 11:59 PM
What about the other 4 convicted murderers?

I dunno. Look them up. Maybe they should stay in prison.:confused:

We know what we've been told; what do you THINK?

Novaheart
01-12-2012, 01:53 AM
We know what we've been told; what do you THINK?

I think that if we let everyone (except the crazies) out of prison all at once, the same people would be back in there within a year or so.

Now we might lose some innocent people to this experiment, but think about all the loud mouthes it will shut the fuck up. No more can the Innocence Project scam the youth and other useful idiots of this nation into thinking that a significant percentage of the men in prison are there due to institutional racism of the past, or selective enforcement, or whatever excuse they have for the fact that the demographics of prisons don't match those of the nation. I think these people watch too much Law And Order.

Kay
01-12-2012, 02:03 AM
I think those convicted of murder should have been executed within 6 months of their conviction. Then we wouldn't even be having this lame discussion on whether they should have been pardoned or not in the first place.

txradioguy
01-12-2012, 10:14 AM
I think those convicted of murder should have been executed within 6 months of their conviction. Then we wouldn't even be having this lame discussion on whether they should have been pardoned or not in the first place.

QFT

txradioguy
01-12-2012, 10:17 AM
Lanie ought to read a little about exactly who got pardoned. Barbour won't discuss it.

Some of the pardoned have already died, many are out of prison, some have already served long sentences. But it makes better headlines to say, "SOME HAVE EVEN BEEN CONVICTED OF MURDER!"

I have no doubt that she read the whole thing.

She was perfoming her due dilligence as a Libtard to try for a "gotcha" moment.

And as usual...Bridget failed miserably.

Adam Wood
01-12-2012, 10:26 AM
You have to peruse the names yourself; the press just figures you're going to read the headlines and fall in step. Here's one:
1) Kirby Tate got 60 years in 2003 for selling marijuana to an undercover wire-wearer as a habitual offender, two prior offenses, both related to sale of marijuana less than an ounce. He was holding about 36 lbs. Here's a link to the proceedings: http://courts.ms.gov/Images/Opinions/CO24636.pdf

2) Booker T Barnes....who died in 2009

Here's another interesting case:
3) WHEREAS, Harry Russ Bostick was placed in the Drug Court Program beginning on or about March 4, 2011. His estimated release date from the Drug Court Program, assuming no sanctions, is March 4, 2013.
BUT
Trooper Ray Hall of the Mississippi Highway Patrol says Charity Smith, 18, of Okolona, died as a result of her injuries.

Smith was driving a Buick LeSabre and apparently tried to pull from a private drive onto Highway 278 when she pulled into the path of a 2010 Ford F-150, driven by Harry Bostick, 55, of Oxford.

It was Bosticks third DUI, but look at the facts.....Someone pulled out in front of him.

And on it goes, but you'll have to do your own random search of the names, which are available many places. And when you do search you'll probably find the same information I saw.OK. Thanks.

I can certainly appreciate the concerns over the one that started all of this off, David Gatlin. For those who haven't been following closely, he's the one who shot his wife in the head while she was holding their baby. The family of his victims are, I would say, understandably upset.

One of the articles that I read on this said that there's some sort of tradition of letting well-behaved inmates not only work as a trustee (they keep calling them "trusty," but I must assume that they mean trustee) at the governor's mansion, but also to live at the governor's mansion as well. Now, Mississippi can certainly do as she pleases as a sovereign state, but I have to question the wisdom of such a policy. I shoot my wife in the head as she's holding our infant, and my "punishment" is to live at the governor's mansion? Sheesh. If these were minor offenders, I could possibly see using this program as a carrot to induce good behavior, but hardened murderers? None too swuft, if you ask me. Especially since part of this tradition is to pardon these people when the governor leaves office. That just boggles the mind.

Like I said, Mississippi is free to do as she chooses, but damn....

Novaheart
01-12-2012, 11:58 AM
.........

I have to say that the scenario of the guilty victim has always interested me in that the mothers of MADD and others who make their living off DUI seem to completely ignore the role of the deceased as long as they have a live drunk to blame. Fortunately, here in FLorida they do test the corpse be it a pedestrian who stepped in front of the car on Gulf Blvd, or the "(compelling description of a young man or woman)" who raced across six lanes of US 19 without regard for oncoming traffic, and landed some poor schmuck in jail because his BAC was .087 which would have been perfectly legal until 1995.

Sorry, but if two drunks collide I don't see how we justify only blaming one of them, unless we're going to apply the same criteria we would if both had been sober. I don't approve of course, but I have known a number of habitual alcoholics (not face down on the bar drunkards) who have safer driving habits than many sober but careless people.

Starbuck
01-12-2012, 12:31 PM
OK. Thanks.

I can certainly appreciate the concerns over the one that started all of this off, David Gatlin. For those who haven't been following closely, he's the one who shot his wife in the head while she was holding their baby. The family of his victims are, I would say, understandably upset.

One of the articles that I read on this said that there's some sort of tradition of letting well-behaved inmates not only work as a trustee (they keep calling them "trusty," but I must assume that they mean trustee) at the governor's mansion, but also to live at the governor's mansion as well. Now, Mississippi can certainly do as she pleases as a sovereign state, but I have to question the wisdom of such a policy. I shoot my wife in the head as she's holding our infant, and my "punishment" is to live at the governor's mansion? Sheesh. If these were minor offenders, I could possibly see using this program as a carrot to induce good behavior, but hardened murderers? None too swuft, if you ask me. Especially since part of this tradition is to pardon these people when the governor leaves office. That just boggles the mind.

Like I said, Mississippi is free to do as she chooses, but damn....

Now you're talking from an informed position. Some of these pardons leave me a little puzzled. I would be happier if Barbour would discuss them, but evidently that's not gonna happen.

It's too late now, though. Everyone in America is now aware that Mississippi has released Murders and Rapists into the world. And the chances of the average dude doing a little homework is about zero.

PS...I looked up the word 'trusty'. The press got it right.:confused: A trustee is something entirely different.

Starbuck
01-12-2012, 12:40 PM
I think those convicted of murder should have been executed within 6 months of their conviction. Then we wouldn't even be having this lame discussion on whether they should have been pardoned or not in the first place.

Now, Kay.

That's why there are degrees of murder and juries and guidelines and appeals. The sentencing procedure is never as simple as you have now chosen to believe. That's the way they do things in China, not the U.S. But you're right. Execution upon conviction would simplify the pardon decisions.

The tradition of pardoning is a good tool, and I think it should remain in place. There are some pardons on the list that are hard to understand. Adam Wood found one and there are several others. Clinton got a lot of heat over his pardons, and Barbour will have to take the heat from his.

linda22003
01-12-2012, 01:14 PM
(they keep calling them "trusty," but I must assume that they mean trustee)

No, you mustn't assume that. Here's an explanation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trusty_system_(prison)

namvet
01-12-2012, 05:22 PM
Judge says no way Jose


As victims' loved ones ask why killers and rapists got pardoned by former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour during his final hours in office, a Mississippi state judge has temporarily halted the release of 21 of the 200-plus pardoned inmates.

Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood had requested the injunction against the inmates' releases, telling reporters he believes some of Barbour's pardons could have violated the state constitution by failing to give sufficient public notice that the convicts were seeking clemency.



story (http://news.yahoo.com/judge-halts-mississippi-pardons-uproar-020954858--abc-news.html)

Lanie
01-12-2012, 08:34 PM
We do.If you think he was blackmailed then why the prefatory statement implying Republicans are soft on crime?

I wanted to be a smarty pants.

I will be happy when this governor is gone.

Lanie
01-12-2012, 08:37 PM
Lanie ought to read a little about exactly who got pardoned. Barbour won't discuss it.

Some of the pardoned have already died, many are out of prison, some have already served long sentences. But it makes better headlines to say, "SOME HAVE EVEN BEEN CONVICTED OF MURDER!"

Usually if one is out of prison, they don't have certain rights. For instance, somebody convicted of murder might not have the right to own a gun or to vote. Pardoning these people allows them to be able to do this.

Now, there's a reason some of these people got long sentences. It's because they were considered to be a danger to society.

Lanie
01-12-2012, 08:40 PM
I think those convicted of murder should have been executed within 6 months of their conviction. Then we wouldn't even be having this lame discussion on whether they should have been pardoned or not in the first place.

While I'm actually against the death penalty, you're right.

What I'd like to see is to take away the ability to pardon from politicians. These people were convicted by a jury of their peers and sentenced by a judge in good standing. There is an appeals process to try to get innocent people out. There are parole boards to evaluate whether one is rehabilitated enough to enter the streets early. We don't need to give unconditional rights to pardon to politicians.

Starbuck
01-12-2012, 10:13 PM
I wanted to be a smarty pants.

I will be happy when this governor is gone.

He's already gone, Sweetie. He left last week.
Try to keep up, now.:)

Kay
01-12-2012, 11:26 PM
Now, Kay.

That's why there are degrees of murder and juries and guidelines and appeals

About those degrees of murder etc you mention,
I've never been burdened with the shades of grey syndrome.


While I'm actually against the death penalty, you're right.

What I'd like to see is to take away the ability to pardon from politicians. These people were convicted by a jury of their peers and sentenced by a judge in good standing. There is an appeals process to try to get innocent people out. There are parole boards to evaluate whether one is rehabilitated enough to enter the streets early. We don't need to give unconditional rights to pardon to politicians.

I tend to agree mostly. I don't mind a governor or president having the pardon power. But maybe there should be some type of mechanism in place where a pardon could be contested within 10 days or veto'd by their Supream Court, just as a check and balance. Better to keep 10 truly rehabilitated convicts in the pokey than let just 1 free to kill again I say.

Adam Wood
01-13-2012, 12:15 AM
While I'm actually against the death penalty, you're right.

What I'd like to see is to take away the ability to pardon from politicians. These people were convicted by a jury of their peers and sentenced by a judge in good standing. There is an appeals process to try to get innocent people out. There are parole boards to evaluate whether one is rehabilitated enough to enter the streets early. We don't need to give unconditional rights to pardon to politicians.This coming from someone who spent years bitching about "the Texacutioner," who actually didn't have that power.

Hmph.

Lanie
01-14-2012, 01:20 PM
This coming from someone who spent years bitching about "the Texacutioner," who actually didn't have that power.

Hmph.

Hush! lol.

I could go into other aspects about Bush and that time period, but you are right. I honestly think that's more Texan culture than anything else. Not that NC culture would have room to talk lately.

I guess seeing Barbour do that just blew my mind. Seriously.

He gave his explanation. He says that they've repented and should be pardoned. He brought up that he trusts them near his grand-children. I can see his point, but isn't it possible that they knew he had the power to free them? I still say that should be left to the parole boards.

Starbuck
01-16-2012, 07:55 PM
OK here's the breakdown:

189 were already freed from prison.

13 were chronically ill and had had their sentences suspended. They remain under supervision and can be re-jailed if they get out of line.

3 got conditional clemency, which means they, too, are supervised and better not screw up again or else they go straight to jail.

5 were mansion trusties. They had worked their way up the prison system through consistent good behavior and lived in a situation where if they wanted to just walk off they could.

I don't expect a single one of the people who called for Barbour's head to take their words back. The point is, that we were all instructed by the press to become outraged and most of us obligingly did so. The "outrage" light came on, and we responded.

http://nems360.com/view/full_story/17181477/article-BILL-CRAWFORD--Governor%E2%80%99s-pardons-erupt-this-time?instance=secondary_stories_left_column