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View Full Version : Healthy eating campaigns ‘causing anorexia’



bijou
02-26-2012, 06:45 PM
A SCOTS expert has said government healthy eating drives are causing anorexia in children.
Dr Jane Morris, chairwoman of the Scottish Eating Disorder Interest Group, said children were obsessing about their diet because of drives to combat obesity.
Last week reports of children as young as six were being treated for anorexia emerged, and figures showed medical treatments were on the rise.
Dr Morris, a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist at the Royal Edinburgh hospital, said it was a ‘huge concern.’
She said: “We’ve had so many families say, all this [the eating disorder] started with the healthy eating lesson.
“Their child has come home from school and said, this food or that food was bad and she was only going to eat good food from now on.

“I’ve never yet heard a parent say, ‘thank goodness for the healthy eating classes because my child would be obese without them.’” ...

http://www.deadlinenews.co.uk/2012/02/26/healthy-eating-campaigns-causing-anorexia/

djones520
02-26-2012, 09:46 PM
Another victory for the nannystate it seems. I'm gonna love it when my kids start going to school and I have to unfuck their heads when they get home. :rolleyes:

Novaheart
02-26-2012, 10:09 PM
Another victory for the nannystate it seems. I'm gonna love it when my kids start going to school and I have to unfuck their heads when they get home. :rolleyes:

Tell you what: try to feed them Scottish food and get back to us if they aren't begging for alfalfa sprout and avocado sandwiches.

Seriously, there has to be something between eating nothing but organic rabbit food and eating pure processed garbage*.




* count chocula, mcdonalds, apple juice sugar water, milk, hamburger, nuggets, hot dogs, chips, etc...

djones520
02-26-2012, 10:17 PM
Tell you what: try to feed them Scottish food and get back to us if they aren't begging for alfalfa sprout and avocado sandwiches.

Seriously, there has to be something between eating nothing but organic rabbit food and eating pure processed garbage*.




* count chocula, mcdonalds, apple juice sugar water, milk, hamburger, nuggets, hot dogs, chips, etc...

I get your trying to be sarcastic here, but the issue isn't what is available to eat. The issue is the government trying to do my job as a parent by practically brain washing kids into starvation. They should have zero say on what food my kid eats as long as he is eating.

Novaheart
02-26-2012, 10:51 PM
They should have zero say on what food my kid eats as long as he is eating.

I have to disagree, not because I don't think you are a good parent, but because the evidence is out there that there is a need to treat juvenile obesity, somehow, someway, and the problem has to be coming from home.

Our society doesn't treat obesity like a health issue, at least it hasn't and it's only just begun to be treated like a health issue. You are a good parent, and many of the parents of those obese children are probably also good parents and the kids are otherwise happy, but they aren't healthy, and they aren't happy with their bodies.

The schools have long been part of the delivery system of children's health. Granted, some aspects of it have been corrupt, like the Dept. Of Agriculture food pyramid. It's wrong, it was wrong before, and it's still wrong. Moreover, it's wrong wrong wrong for the 40% of kids who simply cannot eat the same diet as a skinny kid that grazes at will. Schools require vaccinations. Schools have taught about the food pyramid at least since I was a child. Schools deal with things like lice and impetigo. Schools teach kids about good manners and respectful health conscious ways.

But there is a right way and a wrong way. In a private Quaker school my Little Darling was told by a neohippie science teacher that hot dogs had rat hairs in them (or something like that). At the time, hot dog was the only thing she really liked to eat. Sure, we should have given her some kind of meatless hot dog, but my mother likes Hebrew National so that's what was for lunch. At the time, even I would eat them now and then. She declared herself a vegetarian, but pretty much at the same age that all girls decide that they are vegetarians.

Odysseus
02-27-2012, 11:25 AM
Another victory for the nannystate it seems. I'm gonna love it when my kids start going to school and I have to unfuck their heads when they get home. :rolleyes:
Tell me about it. The other day, my daughter brought home a library book on Pocahontas, and it was a collection of PC drivel. The English were untrustworthy and stuffy, while the noble natives were virtuous, kind, etc... They even claimed that Pocahontas hadn't saved John Smith, that he misunderstood what was going on, and that the raising of the axe over his neck was ceremonial, and they were inducting him into the tribe!

I have to disagree, not because I don't think you are a good parent, but because the evidence is out there that there is a need to treat juvenile obesity, somehow, someway, and the problem has to be coming from home.

Our society doesn't treat obesity like a health issue, at least it hasn't and it's only just begun to be treated like a health issue. You are a good parent, and many of the parents of those obese children are probably also good parents and the kids are otherwise happy, but they aren't healthy, and they aren't happy with their bodies.
But obesity isn't the issue, parenting is. Juvenile obesity rates are higher among the lowest economic quintiles. Simply put, the poorer a family is, the more likely it is that a child in that family will be overweight. We also know that poorer families tend to have poorer school stats across the board, so we can extrapolate from that. The same lack of mental discipline that leads to poor grades and higher dropout rates also leads to poor food choices, inability to defer gratification and make decisions based on longterm consequences.


The schools have long been part of the delivery system of children's health. Granted, some aspects of it have been corrupt, like the Dept. Of Agriculture food pyramid. It's wrong, it was wrong before, and it's still wrong. Moreover, it's wrong wrong wrong for the 40% of kids who simply cannot eat the same diet as a skinny kid that grazes at will. Schools require vaccinations. Schools have taught about the food pyramid at least since I was a child. Schools deal with things like lice and impetigo. Schools teach kids about good manners and respectful health conscious ways.
But most of the school issues surrounding a child's health were based on preventing poor health practices from infecting other kids. When a kid comes to school with lice, the school isn't as concerned with the health of that one child as they are concerned with preventing an outbreak among the other kids. That's why health classes used to be called "hygiene" classes, and there were focused on teaching the basics of keeping yourself clean and healthy so that you wouldn't become a health problem for others. The focus on obesity represents an expansion of the schools' role in the lives of children, at the expense of parents, but the problem isn't that one meal per day that the nanny state provides, it's the other two meals and the various snacks consumed when the nanny isn't looking, as well as the level of physical activity that a child gets outside of school. When I was a kid, I took the bus to school and walked home, because I got to pocket the bus fare and it kept me in comic books and other stuff. Those walks kept me very healthy. Today, we don't let our kids out of our sight, and the idea of my daughter walking home three blocks from her school without one of us along is terrifying. In protecting our kids from one danger, we expose them to others.

But there is a right way and a wrong way. In a private Quaker school my Little Darling was told by a neohippie science teacher that hot dogs had rat hairs in them (or something like that). At the time, hot dog was the only thing she really liked to eat. Sure, we should have given her some kind of meatless hot dog, but my mother likes Hebrew National so that's what was for lunch. At the time, even I would eat them now and then. She declared herself a vegetarian, but pretty much at the same age that all girls decide that they are vegetarians.

Meatless hot dogs have the same impurities as hot dogs with meat. Rodent hairs and droppings are the result of processing, not sourcing, and no factory that processes food of any kind is ever going to be 100% spotless. As long as the processing plant meets health department standards, you have no real issue, and Hebrew National actually exceeds the government standards in most areas, because they really do take the cleanliness of the food religiously.

You're far likelier to get a food borne illness from produce than meat nowadays, especially organic produce. Organic fertilizers are much more likely to incubate bacteria like e-coli than inorganic fertilizers, and pesticides kill, not just bugs, but other contaminants. We are living in a time when our food is the safest that it has ever been in human history, but the anxieties about it are absurdly high.