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Rockntractor
03-16-2012, 12:05 AM
A weak economy and high debt levels are prompting more young adults to return to the family nest, a new survey shows. Perhaps surprisingly, most are happy with their living arrangements.

By Husna Haq, Correspondent / March 15, 2012
After graduating from Brown University in 2009 with a bachelor’s degree in comparative literature and completing a Fulbright scholarship in Brazil, Cassie Owens was left with a few dollars on her stipend and no job in sight. So, Ms. Owens returned home to her mother in Philadelphia.
“I moved back home pretty much for lack of money and prospects,” she says. Owens’s cousin, Evon Burton, who also returned home after graduating from Morehouse College in 2009, adds, “The choice is to go out and be in debt or to pursue your dreams and save up money at home, in a safe, stable environment.”

Owens and Burton are among the scores of so-called “boomerang kids,” young adults who move out of the family home for school or work and then return home. Unable to find well-paying work in a weak economy, escalating numbers of young adults – as many as 3 in 10 – are returning home to the family nest, resulting in the highest share of young adults living in multigenerational households since the 1950s, according to a Pew Research Center report released Thursday.

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“The rise in the boomerang phenomenon illustrates the effect the recession and the weak economy are having on young adults,” says Kim Parker, a senior researcher at Pew and the author of the study. “Young adults were hit particularly hard in the job market and are having to delay reaching some basic financial milestones of adulthood because of this.”

Moe>http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Society/2012/0315/Three-in-10-young-adults-live-with-parents-highest-level-since-1950s

Novaheart
03-16-2012, 12:35 AM
......... By Husna Haq

Infiltration......


http://www.csmonitor.com/var/ezflow_site/storage/images/media/images/1113-husna-haq-muslim-america/7102953-1-eng-US/1113-Husna-Haq-Muslim-America_full_600.jpg

http://www.csmonitor.com/var/ezflow_site/storage/images/media/images/1113-husna-haq-muslim-america/7102953-1-eng-US/1113-Husna-Haq-Muslim-America_full_600.jpg

Kay
03-16-2012, 02:16 AM
When my son got out of the Marine Corps he moved back in with me for about 7 months or so till he got a job and reaclimated to civilian life. I treasured that time so much having him home again. I hated to see him move out on his own again. I keep telling him to enjoy this time because soon as I turn 65 I'm retiring and moving in with him to be a burden. :rolleyes:

m00
03-16-2012, 02:38 AM
After graduating from Brown University in 2009 with a bachelor’s degree in comparative literature and completing a Fulbright scholarship in Brazil, Cassie Owens was left with a few dollars on her stipend and no job in sight.

Well, I guess the job market for bachelor's in comparative literature from an international school in Brazil isn't what it used to be.

fettpett
03-16-2012, 08:30 AM
ugh...waste of spaces....I haven't lived with a parent since 2003 after we moved out of my in-laws place into our own after moving to MI. I understand neccessity for short term, but it hasn't been short term for many of these people, it's been long term 3+ years. Throw in faux degrees like the one above and you end up with a bunch of libtards with little to no job experience and no prospects for one due to stupidity

noonwitch
03-16-2012, 09:53 AM
I haven't lived with my parents since the summer after I graduated from college. I never will, that's what nursing homes are for.

Odysseus
03-16-2012, 10:18 AM
You'd think that comic book sales would be higher with this many adults living with their parents. :biggrin-new:

Novaheart
03-16-2012, 11:39 AM
Multigeneration households were the norm until after WWII and even then a lot of people still lived in extended families. For a bunch of people who bitch and moan about the deterioration of the American family to then complain about families which live close or in full houses seems odd.

More Americans should be living in extended families and building their financial strength.

You show me a kid who wants to move out at 18 simply to be independent, noble, and virtuous and I'll show you a delusional parent.

Novaheart
03-16-2012, 11:40 AM
I haven't lived with my parents since the summer after I graduated from college. I never will, that's what nursing homes are for.

Are your parents disagreeable people?

Starbuck
03-16-2012, 11:44 AM
After graduating from Brown University in 2009 with a bachelor’s degree in comparative literature and completing a Fulbright scholarship in Brazil, Cassie Owens was left with a few dollars on her stipend and no job in sight.

Well, I guess the job market for bachelor's in comparative literature from an international school in Brazil isn't what it used to be.

No, no. You're wrong. It's exactly where it used to be - where it always has been!

But, come to think of , exactly what is a Fulbright scholarship?

The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government and is designed to “increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries.” With this goal as a starting point, the Fulbright Program has provided almost 300,000 participants—chosen for their academic merit and leadership potential — with the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.http://www.cies.org/about_fulb.htm
Sounds to me like an incestuous arrangement whereby the nincompoops in Washington select young people of like mind to attend attend indoctrination camps in foreign countries.
"Increase Mutual Understanding"? Really? Sounds to me like the Fulbright program - at a cost of 220 million dollars annually - is a complete failure.

namvet
03-16-2012, 02:19 PM
many reasons. they can't find or lost their jobs. divorce etc. 2 daugthers and their kids moved back in with their parents across the street.

Novaheart
03-16-2012, 02:43 PM
many reasons. they can't find or lost their jobs. divorce etc. 2 daugthers and their kids moved back in with their parents across the street.

I don't think that multigenerational households should be considered a negative. When my grandparents were married, they lived in the same house with my great grandparents. When my grandparents had kids, my great grandparents moved into their parents' house. When they got old, they moved in with the youngest son and his wife. This had been going on for a long long time. When my grandfather died, my grandmother moved in with my parents and I was living at home. As she got older, we scheduled ourselves (eventually along with a nurse) so that my grandmother was not alone.

namvet
03-16-2012, 03:12 PM
I don't think that multigenerational households should be considered a negative. When my grandparents were married, they lived in the same house with my great grandparents. When my grandparents had kids, my great grandparents moved into their parents' house. When they got old, they moved in with the youngest son and his wife. This had been going on for a long long time. When my grandfather died, my grandmother moved in with my parents and I was living at home. As she got older, we scheduled ourselves (eventually along with a nurse) so that my grandmother was not alone.

good point but that was a different generation. a lotta parents today resent their kids moving in. they raised them to go out on their own and the parents want to be left alone in their twilight years or egg nest if you prefer

FlaGator
03-16-2012, 03:28 PM
I wonder what their DU names are?

hai
03-16-2012, 03:51 PM
I don't think that multigenerational households should be considered a negative. When my grandparents were married, they lived in the same house with my great grandparents. When my grandparents had kids, my great grandparents moved into their parents' house. When they got old, they moved in with the youngest son and his wife. This had been going on for a long long time. When my grandfather died, my grandmother moved in with my parents and I was living at home. As she got older, we scheduled ourselves (eventually along with a nurse) so that my grandmother was not alone.

I've noticed in many cultures like Asian cultures,that kids seem to live with their parents,compared to Haole cultures,which is the other way around.

wannaberocker
03-16-2012, 11:44 PM
It basically comes down to numbers. Lets take me for example. I am 26 college grad and i live with my parents. Why? well because my current job is a part time min wage job. Most of what i make goes to paying off my student loans. My parents are nice enough to feed me and not charge me rent.

Now my feeling is that if if im able to find a job that pays around $ 30,000 yr. It would take me about a year or so to pay off my student loans and maybe another year to start thinking about buying a house. So in all honesty, i can be out of my parents house and into my own house by age 28.

As recent employment numbers have shown. The hardest hit by the recession are the fresh graduates with little experience.

wannaberocker
03-16-2012, 11:50 PM
Multigeneration households were the norm until after WWII and even then a lot of people still lived in extended families. For a bunch of people who bitch and moan about the deterioration of the American family to then complain about families which live close or in full houses seems odd.

More Americans should be living in extended families and building their financial strength.

You show me a kid who wants to move out at 18 simply to be independent, noble, and virtuous and I'll show you a delusional parent.

There is truth in what your saying about people living with extended family untill WWII. However, you have to ask what changed? Well what changed was the economics of the country. More people were able to afford living on their own.

What changed now is also based on economics. When people arnt making money, they cant afford to move out. Its as simple as that.
So on the one hand we can say "hey its nice that people are staying with family and building bonds". But on the other we can look at the whole and say "economically we are kinda scrowed".

wannaberocker
03-16-2012, 11:55 PM
I've noticed in many cultures like Asian cultures,that kids seem to live with their parents,compared to Haole cultures,which is the other way around.

Again i will point out that its all centered in economics. For example kids living with parents was huge in India (and still is). However, last year i was reading an article that point out how as India is becoming more economically sound. The trends are changing in cities, Children are now living in their own homes because they can afford to have their own homes.

Asia stuck with the extended family house system because it was economically impossible for people to own 2 homes let alone 1. However, that is changing now as asia becomes more economically sound.

Novaheart
03-17-2012, 12:36 PM
It basically comes down to numbers. Lets take me for example. I am 26 college grad and i live with my parents. Why? well because my current job is a part time min wage job. Most of what i make goes to paying off my student loans. My parents are nice enough to feed me and not charge me rent.

Now my feeling is that if if im able to find a job that pays around $ 30,000 yr. It would take me about a year or so to pay off my student loans and maybe another year to start thinking about buying a house. So in all honesty, i can be out of my parents house and into my own house by age 28.

As recent employment numbers have shown. The hardest hit by the recession are the fresh graduates with little experience.

Wouldn't it make more sense for you to remain at home, get a good job, pay off your loans, buy a house, live in it for a few days, move back in with your parents, then rent out the house you bought while contributing to the early pay off of your parents' mortgage?

Novaheart
03-17-2012, 12:44 PM
Again i will point out that its all centered in economics. For example kids living with parents was huge in India (and still is). However, last year i was reading an article that point out how as India is becoming more economically sound. The trends are changing in cities, Children are now living in their own homes because they can afford to have their own homes.

Asia stuck with the extended family house system because it was economically impossible for people to own 2 homes let alone 1. However, that is changing now as asia becomes more economically sound.

What are we talking about in terms of rooms per person though?

The US has a rooms per person that is unmatched by any country in the world. Even our poor people have an average of less than one person per room. Mind you, I don't have a problem with that, but my point is that in the US we have Mom and Dad (or the survivor) living alone in a three bedroom house, perhaps with a 2 bedroom house at the beach/mountains/lake/Florida , while Junior and his BFF live in a 2 bedroom condo, Sister and her husband and one kid live in a four bedroom drivealot, and Justin lives in a studio apartment in Los Angeles with his chihuahua Bruiser.

namvet
03-17-2012, 02:09 PM
Wouldn't it make more sense for you to remain at home, get a good job, pay off your loans, buy a house, live in it for a few days, move back in with your parents, then rent out the house you bought while contributing to the early pay off of your parents' mortgage?

mortgage co's will not let you rent. if you buy only you can live it. its in the contract

fettpett
03-17-2012, 06:18 PM
see the problem isn't the "multigeneraltional" family units, the problem comes because many of these kids don't TRY and work or pay for household expenses even though they should be at lest paying rent if not electric and heat as well as food costs.

Bailey
03-17-2012, 06:29 PM
mortgage co's will not let you rent. if you buy only you can live it. its in the contract

Then do people have to pay of the loan before they can rent?

namvet
03-17-2012, 07:07 PM
Then do people have to pay of the loan before they can rent?

pay of. you mean pay off??? yes. once the loan is paid off you can rent it to terrorists

Novaheart
03-17-2012, 11:24 PM
see the problem isn't the "multigeneraltional" family units, the problem comes because many of these kids don't TRY and work or pay for household expenses even though they should be at lest paying rent if not electric and heat as well as food costs.

"Kids" only move out so they can screw and party. I knew a number of people in suburban Maryland whose parents had simply abandoned the basement to the kids.

wannaberocker
03-17-2012, 11:34 PM
Wouldn't it make more sense for you to remain at home, get a good job, pay off your loans, buy a house, live in it for a few days, move back in with your parents, then rent out the house you bought while contributing to the early pay off of your parents' mortgage?

Well there are other factors that might play a role in it. For example currently im single. If in 2 yrs or so i was to get married. Then my parents house would be to small for me and my new spouse, So that would pretty much force me to get a saperate place. Now if in 2 years i was still single, then i wouldnt mind give my parents rent. I mean what good will getting a house "ALONE" do for me? nothing really, i dont wanna live alone, its not fun and it gets lonely. Atleast at my parents house i have some sort of human contact.

So yeah it would make sense to stay with my folks if im still single in 2 years.

wannaberocker
03-17-2012, 11:39 PM
What are we talking about in terms of rooms per person though?

The US has a rooms per person that is unmatched by any country in the world. Even our poor people have an average of less than one person per room. Mind you, I don't have a problem with that, but my point is that in the US we have Mom and Dad (or the survivor) living alone in a three bedroom house, perhaps with a 2 bedroom house at the beach/mountains/lake/Florida , while Junior and his BFF live in a 2 bedroom condo, Sister and her husband and one kid live in a four bedroom drivealot, and Justin lives in a studio apartment in Los Angeles with his chihuahua Bruiser.

haha i lke your example. Well my story about india points to the simple idea that as people gain wealth. The children start moving out and buying their own homes (especially married children). Lets be honest couples world wide realize that living with mom and dad is not much fun because it takes away the privecy a couple wants.

wannaberocker
03-17-2012, 11:42 PM
"Kids" only move out so they can screw and party. I knew a number of people in suburban Maryland whose parents had simply abandoned the basement to the kids.

And that is very true. A big attraction for your average 20 year old to move out is that "oh ill be free to screw and party". Which is why i personally dont mind living with my parents even though im 26.
1. I cant afford to live on my own right now.
2. Because i am a practicing christian and i dont smoke, drink and dont believe in sex before marriage.

So if i was to move out and live on my own. My life would be very very boring lol cause i wouldnt be partying or screwing.

Odysseus
03-18-2012, 12:20 PM
mortgage co's will not let you rent. if you buy only you can live it. its in the contract

We are still paying the mortgage on our house in Texas and we're renting it out. The mortgage company doesn't care as long as we make the payments.

namvet
03-18-2012, 12:41 PM
We are still paying the mortgage on our house in Texas and we're renting it out. The mortgage company doesn't care as long as we make the payments.

long as they don't care good. mine has it in the contract no renting or leasing. most do

AmPat
03-18-2012, 01:37 PM
I've noticed in many cultures like Asian cultures,that kids seem to live with their parents,compared to Haole cultures,which is the other way around.
Are you native Hawaiian? If not, aren't you a "Haole?"
If I were to guess, I'd say you are a Haole with an asian nationality.:rolleyes:

Zeus
03-18-2012, 06:04 PM
mortgage co's will not let you rent. if you buy only you can live it. its in the contract

If you are talking a Va guaranteed loan It only stipulates that the buyer must plan on occupying the home at the time of closing. It does not stipulate a specific time period. Also doesn't say who can/cannot live in the home.

MultiGenerational households are actually beneficial to all if it's a mutual agreeable arrangement by all.

myself i haven't lived in my parents home since I was 17.

Hopefully I won't be moving in with my parents anytime soon since they are both dead. :blue:

Lanie
03-18-2012, 09:14 PM
Living with family and helping each other out beats living "independently" on welfare. There's a time period when living with family was the norm.

m00
03-19-2012, 04:56 AM
I don't think that multigenerational households should be considered a negative. When my grandparents were married, they lived in the same house with my great grandparents. When my grandparents had kids, my great grandparents moved into their parents' house. When they got old, they moved in with the youngest son and his wife. This had been going on for a long long time. When my grandfather died, my grandmother moved in with my parents and I was living at home. As she got older, we scheduled ourselves (eventually along with a nurse) so that my grandmother was not alone.

This was before they invented the "golden arrow of consumption", though.

Odysseus
03-19-2012, 09:38 AM
Hopefully I won't be moving in with my parents anytime soon since they are both dead. :blue:

At least the rent will be cheap. :biggrin-new:


Living with family and helping each other out beats living "independently" on welfare. There's a time period when living with family was the norm.

But, we are forgetting that at one time, we were also a far more rural nation. Farm families lived together because the business was the land, and it required labor from all generations. Urbanization and factory work made multi-generational living less economically viable, as people had to be near their jobs and housing was at a premium. Also, Social Security broke part of the multi-generational model by socializing retirement. Retirees now had the option of moving on to sunnier climes and the kids were perfectly happy to work and live on their own. Throw in the culture's expansion of adolescence (k-12, college, grad school, post-grad school) and you have whole segments of professionals that don't start their first real job until their late-20s-early-30s.

Zeus
03-19-2012, 02:18 PM
At least the rent will be cheap. :biggrin-new:



But, we are forgetting that at one time, we were also a far more rural nation. Farm families lived together because the business was the land, and it required labor from all generations. Urbanization and factory work made multi-generational living less economically viable, as people had to be near their jobs and housing was at a premium. Also, Social Security broke part of the multi-generational model by socializing retirement. Retirees now had the option of moving on to sunnier climes and the kids were perfectly happy to work and live on their own. Throw in the culture's expansion of adolescence (k-12, college, grad school, post-grad school) and you have whole segments of professionals that don't start their first real job until their late-20s-early-30s.

Back from where i originated in life my family has somewhat of a family compound. There is the 20 acres where my mom & dad's house is and the farms base of Operation, Equipment, buildings etc. across the street my brothers family has about 3 acres and abutting my folks place my sis and family have about 3 or 4 acres.

All that but about 5 acres within town limits. My family and another business pay pay over 50% of the local taxes in that small town.

I love my mother but I told her once that even if I did move back home her front yard or across the street was the last place I'd live.