PDA

View Full Version : Thomas Kinkade Dead: Famed Painter Dies At Age 54



Hawkgirl
04-07-2012, 01:31 AM
SAN FRANCISCO Artist Thomas Kinkade, whose brushwork paintings of idyllic landscapes, cottages and churches have been big sellers for dealers across the United States, died Friday, a family spokesman said.

Kinkade, 54, died at his home in Los Gatos in the San Francisco Bay Area of what appeared to be natural causes, David Satterfield said.

Kinkade called himself the "Painter of Light," and his sentimental paintings, with their scenes of country gardens and churches in dewy morning light, were beloved by middlebrow America but reviled by the art establishment. He claimed to be the nation's most collected living artist, and his paintings and spin-off products were said to fetch some $100 million a year in sales, and to be in 10 million homes in the United States.

His paintings generally depict tranquil scenes with lush landscaping and streams running nearby. Many contain images from Bible passages.

"I'm a warrior for light," Kinkade, a self-described devout Christian, told the San Jose Mercury News in 2002, a reference to the medieval practice of using light to symbolize the divine. "With whatever talent and resources I have, I'm trying to bring light to penetrate the darkness many people feel."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/07/thomas-kinkade-dead_n_1409501.html?icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec1_lnk3%26pLid%3D149982

I loved his art. Our local mall carried his store and I almost bought a Disney picture for my daughter, it was $2000 and it wasn't even an original. Probably a mistake on my part because now his art is going to skyrocket.
RIP, you were a true artist.

Kay
04-07-2012, 12:02 PM
Oh no ..... He was only 54. I loved his paintings and have a few of them.
It used to tickle me how the "art establishment" scoffed at his work.
I always felt that was due to jealousy. Instead of hoarding them back and
only selling limited editions to drive up the price, he chose to share his
work with the masses so everyone could enjoy. No painter ever, in my
opinion not even the old renaissance masters, ever captured light in their
work as well as he did. His paintings mesmerize and always made me feel
like I could just step right into them. His talent was truly a gift from God.
He will live on through his paintings.

RobJohnson
04-07-2012, 03:30 PM
So Sad.
Many people were able to connect or reconnect with Christ through his paintings.

His talents were Blessed and each one a masterpiece.

Novaheart
04-07-2012, 03:57 PM
Elevator art.

Kay
04-07-2012, 06:21 PM
Elevator art.

Only to the soulless.

Novaheart
04-07-2012, 09:59 PM
Only to the soulless.

http://www.floridatrend.com/images/photos/11-03/ga_dali_columbus.jpg

art

NJCardFan
04-07-2012, 10:36 PM
Elevator art.

I take it this is art to you:
http://howcanpeoplebesostupid.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/piss_christ.jpg
http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/gallery/2001/05/29/ofili.jpg

Novaheart
04-08-2012, 12:43 AM
I take it this is art to you:

You have no reason to "take it" that Mapplethorpe would enjoy my approval, especially when I gave you an example of the art that I like. But we can discuss Piss Christ if you find it interesting.

Piss Christ would actually be interesting if he hadn't let us know how he did it. Since it's pre-photoshop, the effect is mysteriously rusty, like perhaps it's a photo of something found submerged on a wreck. It's quite ethereal, and has some of the lighting qualities that Kinkade fans gush over.

Hawkgirl
04-08-2012, 12:55 AM
Elevator art.

He didn't paint depravity so I can see why you wouldn't like it.

Novaheart
04-08-2012, 01:13 AM
He didn't paint depravity so I can see why you wouldn't like it.

Is the Dali painting depravity to you or is this just your usual ignorant ass jaw flapping?

Odysseus
04-08-2012, 10:22 AM
Elevator art.

The thing that you have in common with Serrano is the habit of pissing on anything anybody else cares for. Couldn't you have given your inner Grinch a rest long enough for the people who enjoyed his art to take a moment?


Is the Dali painting depravity to you or is this just your usual ignorant ass jaw flapping?

I always found Dali to be garish and obvious. He had great technique, but he was so busy being shocking that he never drew the viewer in. You never got lost in his images because you were aware that they are images.

Hawkgirl
04-08-2012, 11:24 PM
Is the Dali painting depravity to you or is this just your usual ignorant ass jaw flapping?

I'm not impressed with Dali or your insult. Try again turdburglar.

Novaheart
04-08-2012, 11:40 PM
I always found Dali to be garish and obvious. He had great technique, but he was so busy being shocking that he never drew the viewer in. You never got lost in his images because you were aware that they are images.

On New Years Day ten years ago, I took a collection of Dali prints (dimensions 11 x 17) and ripped them up. I prepared a backing board and laid out the supplies for making a collage. I gave my best friend 45 minutes to arrange the "Pieces of Dali" and then we glued them down. It's still hanging in my hallway. It came out really great. The inspiration was that I was re-reading Andy Warhol's diary.

I understand the objection to Dali's work, but I like a photographic quality to painted art.

NJCardFan
04-09-2012, 12:00 AM
On New Years Day ten years ago, I took a collection of Dali prints (dimensions 11 x 17) and ripped them up. I prepared a backing board and laid out the supplies for making a collage. I gave my best friend 45 minutes to arrange the "Pieces of Dali" and then we glued them down. It's still hanging in my hallway. It came out really great. The inspiration was that I was re-reading Andy Warhol's diary.

I understand the objection to Dali's work, but I like a photographic quality to painted art.

Thank you for proving liberal elitism. In one post you put down a recently deceased artists art but then are defending to the bone when someone says they don't like the art of a favorite of yours. For some reason you can't seem to understand that people have different tastes. Instead, you choose to be a smug elitist about it.

Odysseus
04-09-2012, 12:00 AM
On New Years Day ten years ago, I took a collection of Dali prints (dimensions 11 x 17) and ripped them up. I prepared a backing board and laid out the supplies for making a collage. I gave my best friend 45 minutes to arrange the "Pieces of Dali" and then we glued them down. It's still hanging in my hallway. It came out really great. The inspiration was that I was re-reading Andy Warhol's diary.

I understand the objection to Dali's work, but I like a photographic quality to painted art.

So do I, but there's still much better. If you really want great surrealism, look at Magritte, who painted much more subtly than Dali. If you want illustrative realism, go no further than Norman Rockwell (the reproductions don't do his paintings justice), or if you want to see great painting by some classicists, you can't go wrong with Bougerou, Waterhouse or Alma-Tadema.

NJCardFan
04-09-2012, 12:05 AM
So do I, but there's still much better. If you really want great surrealism, look at Magritte, who painted much more subtly than Dali. If you want illustrative realism, go no further than Norman Rockwell (the reproductions don't do his paintings justice), or if you want to see great painting by some classicists, you can't go wrong with Bougerou, Waterhouse or Alma-Tadema.

There used to be a Rockwell museum in Philly. I went there years ago. I enjoy his art. Nothing like simple Americana. As for art, my tastes are simple. As a baseball fan, I really like Dick Perez's work:
http://www.dickperez.com/image/products/JimBunning.jpghttp://www.sportscollectorsdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Kelly.png

linda22003
04-09-2012, 09:19 AM
He painted pretty pictures, but nothing I would want to actually own. Too bad he died relatively young; I wonder what the cause was.

linda22003
04-09-2012, 09:26 AM
The artist who was originally known as the "painter of light" was J.M.W. Turner. Here's a painting I'd love to own - Sun Setting on a Lake (1840) - but the Tate Gallery would probably object strenuously.

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/turner/i/sun-setting.jpg

Bailey
04-09-2012, 09:38 AM
There are so many of the left knocking this man after he died, thats a very good reason to check out his works.

linda22003
04-09-2012, 09:44 AM
There are so many of the left knocking this man after he died, thats a very good reason to check out his works.

I'm surprised you've never seen any of them. You can probably check him out at the nearest shopping mall; there are galleries of his at them all over the country.

Novaheart
04-09-2012, 09:52 AM
Thank you for proving liberal elitism. In one post you put down a recently deceased artists art but then are defending to the bone when someone says they don't like the art of a favorite of yours. For some reason you can't seem to understand that people have different tastes. Instead, you choose to be a smug elitist about it.

It's not being a smug elitist. Art is political, but artistic tastes aren't necessarily political. I called it elevator art. Elevator music is some of the most popular music in the world, people listen to it all day long in offices and public buildings. They find it soothing. It's not great music, it's not intended to be great music. It's intended to be soothing.

I happen to love Theme To A Summer Place by Percy Faith. I have no idea what Percy Faith's politics were/are.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaXzeQoWTko

Odysseus
04-09-2012, 09:57 AM
There are so many of the left knocking this man after he died, thats a very good reason to check out his works.

I was sort of familiar with him before, and I always liked his technique, but found the execution a bit kitschy. My favorite landscape painter was Maxfield Parrish. The American illustrators of the last century were at least as good as the great masters, but they lose out to them because of subject matter and time.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VA2Lzm4X19g/TeVpzJ0q5uI/AAAAAAAAB5U/FXjjujjU0aI/s1600/mp_daybreak%255B1%255D.jpg

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-O6OOqqk9ygc/TeVmcuaag4I/AAAAAAAAB3c/xA3i79PEu00/s1600/old-white-birch%255B1%255D.jpg

Bailey
04-09-2012, 10:11 AM
I'm surprised you've never seen any of them. You can probably check him out at the nearest shopping mall; there are galleries of his at them all over the country.

lol you are a piece of work. Please dont let the bottom of your nose get sunburned.

linda22003
04-09-2012, 10:13 AM
Parrish was a great illustrator, and his colors were absolutely psychedelic. :) I visited his home, "Aspet", years ago; it's in a lovely area of New Hampshire (he was part of the Cornish Art Colony up there). One of his most famous works illustrated the nursery rhyme of "Old King Cole", and is the namesake of the King Cole bar at the St. Regis in New York:

http://kingcolebar.com/

linda22003
04-09-2012, 10:14 AM
lol you are a piece of work. Please dont let the bottom of your nose get sunburned.

That wasn't a snobbish comment, just the truth on where to find him. You said you were going to check out his work, which implied you had not seen it.

Odysseus
04-09-2012, 10:20 AM
lol you are a piece of work. Please dont let the bottom of your nose get sunburned.

Uh, I hate to say it, but she's right. Kinkade's prints are very popular in mall art shops. There are even versions of his paintings with LEDs embedded in the print to enhance the lighting.

Novaheart
04-09-2012, 10:25 AM
Uh, I hate to say it, but she's right. Kinkade's prints are very popular in mall art shops. There are even versions of his paintings with LEDs embedded in the print to enhance the lighting.

I love kitsch, in tastefully limited quantities of course. My friend Barry's grandmother had a painting of Venice with little electric lights built into the scene in place of the gas lamps, street lights, and the lantern on the gondola. I loved it, and asked if he would make sure that I got it if her condo was ever sold (she was already dead). His parents use her condo for vacations, so I guess it's still on the wall.

Arroyo_Doble
04-09-2012, 11:06 AM
Call me jingo but I like the 20th Century Americans.

As far as realism, no one beats Robert Bechtle.


http://www.sfmoma.org/images/artwork/large/74.87_01_D02.jpg


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2223/2053926756_be0590faef_o.jpg

Odysseus
04-09-2012, 11:59 AM
Call me jingo but I like the 20th Century Americans.

As far as realism, no one beats Robert Bechtle.


http://www.sfmoma.org/images/artwork/large/74.87_01_D02.jpg


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2223/2053926756_be0590faef_o.jpg

Eh. Nice technique, but I feel like I'm looking at a photograph. There's nothing beyond the surface there. Neal Adams used to say that style was the extent to which we got things wrong, but I always thought that style was reality plus vision. The point of a painting isn't to simply reproduce reality (that's what cameras are for), but to give us a sense of more than just the surface.

Hawkgirl
04-09-2012, 12:03 PM
There are so many of the left knocking this man after he died, thats a very good reason to check out his works.

He painted a lot of cathedrals and peaceful scenery. Something the left wouldn't know anything about. I love his winter cottages paintings...but he also does a wonderful ocean art as well. He's a well rounded painter and all his work is impressively beautiful. He's also painted Disney characters and makes them come to life in paintings. Amazing stuff. Don't listen to the naysayers.

Hawkgirl
04-09-2012, 12:05 PM
Uh, I hate to say it, but she's right. Kinkade's prints are very popular in mall art shops. There are even versions of his paintings with LEDs embedded in the print to enhance the lighting.

That is because he actually wanted to share his art with the people. Not have it stuck in some snooty gallery for the liberals.

linda22003
04-09-2012, 12:07 PM
That is because he actually wanted to share his art with the people. Not have it stuck in some snooty gallery for the liberals.

Oh. And here I thought it had to do with profit margins. :smile-new:

Arroyo_Doble
04-09-2012, 12:07 PM
That is because he actually wanted to share his art with the people. Not have it stuck in some snooty gallery for the liberals.

Hate to be the one to break this to you but conservatives like those art galleries too.

Just a head's up.

Hawkgirl
04-09-2012, 12:08 PM
Oh. And here I thought it had to do with profit margins. :smile-new:

I'm glad he made money on his art. Why shouldn't he?

Hawkgirl
04-09-2012, 12:08 PM
Hate to be the one to break this to you but conservatives like those art galleries too.

Just a head's up.


I'm sure some do. I prefer renaissance art.

Hawkgirl
04-09-2012, 12:11 PM
Call me jingo but I like the 20th Century Americans.

As far as realism, no one beats Robert Bechtle.


http://www.sfmoma.org/images/artwork/large/74.87_01_D02.jpg


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2223/2053926756_be0590faef_o.jpg

Maybe, just maybe, I'd hang those in my garage.

linda22003
04-09-2012, 12:16 PM
I'm glad he made money on his art. Why shouldn't he?

No reason in the world. You're looking for an argument where there is none. Unless you can explain to me how it is that you think conservatives don't go to art galleries....?

Hawkgirl
04-09-2012, 12:19 PM
No reason in the world. You're looking for an argument where there is none. ..?

I'm not looking for an argument. I started this thread for those who had an appreciation for Kinkade's art, including myself. Not for you liberals to come in and crap in it. But I am not surprised. Respect and decency is not something I expect from your like.

linda22003
04-09-2012, 12:21 PM
I'm not looking for an argument. I started this thread for those who had an appreciation for Kinkade's art, including myself. Not for you liberals to come in and crap in it. But I am not surprised. Respect and decency is not something I expect from your like.

I haven't said anything bad about Kinkade, except perhaps that I wouldn't want to own any of his pieces -and that's perfectly fine. That's hardly as bad as what you said about the Bechtle pieces. Some people here seem to be quite defensive about their taste in art. You certainly got up on the wrong side of the coffin this morning.

Hawkgirl
04-09-2012, 12:28 PM
I haven't said anything bad about Kinkade, except perhaps that I wouldn't want to own any of his pieces -and that's perfectly fine. That's hardly as bad as what you said about the Bechtle pieces. Some people here seem to be quite defensive about their taste in art. You certainly got up on the wrong side of the coffin this morning.

You're just mad that a Christian painter made money of his art. Me? I have no problem with anyone, including painters, who are profitable. I also don't see how people look at an inkblot and call it art. But that's just me.

Arroyo_Doble
04-09-2012, 12:39 PM
I'm sure some do. I prefer renaissance art.

I am a cultural chauvinist.

Odysseus
04-09-2012, 12:56 PM
That is because he actually wanted to share his art with the people. Not have it stuck in some snooty gallery for the liberals.

And, the snooty galleries turn up their noses at kitsch, unless it's delivered with hip, ironic detachment.


Hate to be the one to break this to you but conservatives like those art galleries too.

Just a head's up.

Not so much. I've pretty much given up on most galleries, unless they are having a retrospective of a specific artist that I like. The galleries in NYC are much more about posing, political posturing and selling of crappy fads than they are about real art, and the difference between a good post-modernist or abstract expressionist and a bad one is completely lost on me.


No reason in the world. You're looking for an argument where there is none. Unless you can explain to me how it is that you think conservatives don't go to art galleries....?

As I said above, it depends. I didn't bother with the galleries when I was in school because they tended to confuse crudity with authenticity, and I didn't. I pretty much stopped going to the Whitney after one particularly awful Biennial, and confined myself to the Met. Once in a while, a few of us would go to MOMA just to remind ourselves how much western civilization had declined in the last century, but that was the extent of it.

Arroyo_Doble
04-09-2012, 01:08 PM
Not so much. I've pretty much given up on most galleries, unless they are having a retrospective of a specific artist that I like. The galleries in NYC are much more about posing, political posturing and selling of crappy fads than they are about real art, and the difference between a good post-modernist or abstract expressionist and a bad one is completely lost on me.


Well, I am sure there are conservatives who eschew art galleries. I know some who don't.

But it could be because I live in Texas and unlike NYC, there are many conservatives hanging around.

linda22003
04-09-2012, 01:10 PM
You're just mad that a Christian painter made money of his art.

A pretty demented comment, considering that Fra Angelico and Caravaggio are two of my favorite artists. :biggrin-new: