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AmPat
05-23-2012, 02:00 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/ticket/pakistani-doctor-helped-cia-osama-bin-laden-jailed-162306132.html

The Pakistani doctor who helped the CIA find Osama bin Laden has been sentenced to 33 years in jail for treason.

This seems to me to indict Pakistan under the Bush Doctrine.

Madisonian
05-24-2012, 07:13 PM
Ours when it comes to begging for money. Otherwise, not so much.

SaintLouieWoman
05-24-2012, 09:11 PM
Ours when it comes to begging for money. Otherwise, not so much.

You're right on that one. Good work, O administration, for outing our contacts abroad. I hope that O has the guts to speak out and get that doc released. No one will be an informant or cooperate with us after the good doc is left to hang out to dry. O just has to take that victory lap and spike the ball, doesn't he? :rolleyes:

Articulate_Ape
05-24-2012, 10:02 PM
Whose side is Pakistan on?


Their own; just like every country. C'mon! The questions are: What do Pakistanis stand for and believe? Who do they care about? What's in it for them?

They aren't an ally, they are simply a more trusted enemy.

Apache
05-25-2012, 12:34 AM
Their own; just like every country. ....

Ummm... Have you seen the leadership of this country? I submit that you may want to revise that statement.

Just sayin'

Articulate_Ape
05-25-2012, 12:39 AM
Ummm... Have you seen the leadership of this country? I submit that you may want to revise that statement.

Just sayin'

A country is not it's leadership. Never has been. I'm just sayin'.

namvet
05-25-2012, 11:17 AM
wonder how much bin laden was paying them to keep quite about his location for how many years???

TVDOC
05-25-2012, 02:11 PM
As someone mentioned above, Pakistan's problem is its people.......ever since the British division, Pakistan has had severe difficulties governing itself, much of the country is tribal territory, essentially uncontrolled by the central body, subject to tribal leaders and law.

The government tries to be secular, because of the military, who control the nuclear weapons, and the secular civil authority is constantly walking a fine line between appeasing a substantial percentage of the population who are islamists, and Taliban, et al sympathizers, and the military taking control again

The government is constantly under threat from a military coup, or an islamist takeover.......

It's not a good situation, and likely never will get any better.......

doc

OnlyCommunistYouKnow
05-28-2012, 12:58 AM
Pakistan is considered a U.S. ally. However they do show resentment when the United States also supports India. Both of which have nukes aimed at eachother.

Odysseus
05-28-2012, 11:06 AM
Pakistan is considered a U.S. ally. However they do show resentment when the United States also supports India. Both of which have nukes aimed at eachother.

Kind of misses the point.

Pakistan was originally part of India, but even that understates the causes and depths of the split. India was conquered by Muslims and subjected to horrific depredations. The Hindu Kush, literally the place where Hindus die, got its name because of the vast number of slaves exported by the various Muslim rulers who didn't survive the trip through the pass. Muslim rule of India was characterized by mass murder, rape, slavery and the destruction of everything that predated the Islamic conquest. When the British ruled India, they worked directly with anyone who was willing to become educated in the ways of the west, which meant the Hindus and Sikhs. When the British left, the Muslims refused to live in a democratic state in which they were not the majority, and embarked on a campaign of terror in order to win independence. They got it, and then immediately established hostilities with India.

Pakistan was a nominal US ally when India was in the Soviet sphere of influence, but the end of the Cold War has redefined the roles. India now seeks our support against China, while Pakistan sees Afghanistan as a source of strategic depth against India, and seeks to maintain control of it through the Taliban, which was nurtured by the Pakistani ISI. Thus, the current status quo, which is a Pakistani electorate that was galvanized by jihad and which saw Bin Laden as a Muslim hero, and a government that walks a fine line between pandering to the mob and maintaining a death grip on American aid.

Pakistan isn't an ally, so much as a powder keg, with more fuses than we can count.

DumbAss Tanker
05-28-2012, 01:48 PM
Pakistan is not a completely gelled country like the US or the Western European countries, with a strong central government that can unequivocally speak for the nation. There is a lot going on, in different directions within it (The ISI, various armed forces factions, tribal regions, the Westernized upper portion of the urban population, Communists, to name but a few), regardless of whatever nominal position the national government may take on an issue. If it were not for the external threat of India, it would probably break up into smaller entities much like Yugoslavia did in the 90s, probably with at least as much bloodshed in the process. A shattered Pakistan would probably be much more of a problem for us than a schizoid and unrelieable, but nominally intact, country.