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NJCardFan
06-09-2012, 02:55 PM
I put this in this thread because this is where it belongs. For pretty much ever, BC(before Christ) has been used to denote "ancient history". I was reading up on some Roman History and they kept on referring to dates as "BCE" as in "Before Current Events". What makes this mindless moonbat gibberish is that something that happened in 1950 could hardly be considered "current events" let alone something that happened a millennia or 2 ago.

Articulate_Ape
06-09-2012, 03:07 PM
I put this in this thread because this is where it belongs. For pretty much ever, BC(before Christ) has been used to denote "ancient history". I was reading up on some Roman History and they kept on referring to dates as "BCE" as in "Before Current Events". What makes this mindless moonbat gibberish is that something that happened in 1950 could hardly be considered "current events" let alone something that happened a millennia or 2 ago.

BCE stands for Before the Common Era I believe, NJ. I think from a scientific/historical perspective the designation makes sense since there are numerous calendars in use (i.e. the Hebrew Calendar, Gregorian, etc.). In a more integrated world there needs to be a common dating system to avoid confusion.

I don't consider this moonbattery, and it's certainly less absurd than our failure to adopt the metric system here in the US.

Gina
06-09-2012, 03:13 PM
BCE stands for Before the Common Era I believe, NJ. I think from a scientific/historical perspective the designation makes sense since there are numerous calendars in use (i.e. the Hebrew Calendar, Gregorian, etc.). In a more integrated world there needs to be a common dating system to avoid confusion.

I don't consider this moonbattery, and it's certainly less absurd than our failure to adopt the metric system here in the US.

It could be moonbattery if it's used by some (and I bet it is) to diss Christ. Then it would be kooky talk. The metric system always scared me, I was relieved in school when I found out we didn't need to know much about it.

Articulate_Ape
06-09-2012, 03:22 PM
It could be moonbattery if it's used by some (and I bet it is) to diss Christ. Then it would be kooky talk.

That might be so, but it would indeed be kooky talk since it has nothing to do with that and, in fact, has its basis in the Christian calendar. The designation was first developed and frequently used by Christian monks.



The metric system always scared me, I was relieved in school when I found out we didn't need to know much about it.

Don't let it scare you. It's infinitely less complicated than the imperial system.

Retread
06-09-2012, 04:56 PM
...................

Don't let it scare you. It's infinitely less complicated than the imperial system.

And makes a lot more sense. Kids would get arithmetic faster and easier if the US were metric.

Articulate_Ape
06-09-2012, 05:42 PM
And makes a lot more sense. Kids would get arithmetic faster and easier if the US were metric.

Very true. I have often wondered if it is not this very fact that has contributed to our kids' math scores lagging behind much of the world which uses the metric system.

fettpett
06-09-2012, 06:29 PM
Very true. I have often wondered if it is not this very fact that has contributed to our kids' math scores lagging behind much of the world which uses the metric system.


yes...I want to use a system based on an arbitrary measurement that a short dude in pointy hat came up with :rolleyes::cool::friendly_wink:

Madisonian
06-09-2012, 07:05 PM
yes...I want to use a system based on an arbitrary measurement that a short dude in pointy hat came up with :rolleyes::cool::friendly_wink:

Because a measurement system based on the length of 3 barleycorn makes much better sense.

fettpett
06-09-2012, 07:41 PM
Because a measurement system based on the length of 3 barleycorn makes much better sense.


at lest it makes sense...better than some pipsqueak who thought to be Emperor of Europe and failed miserably :cool:

Articulate_Ape
06-09-2012, 09:14 PM
If you understand the number 10, the metric system is easy. If you don't understand the number 10, then you need a math class.

Retread
06-09-2012, 09:47 PM
The “metre” or “meter” has as it's physical standard one ten-millionth of the distance from the North Pole to the equator along the meridian running near Dunkirk in France and Barcelona in Spain. Measures for capacity (volume) and mass were to be derived from the unit of length, thus relating the basic units of the system to each other and to nature. Furthermore, larger and smaller multiples of each unit were to be created by multiplying or dividing the basic units by 10^x or simply by shifting the decimal point. This feature provided a great convenience to users of the system, by eliminating the need for such calculations as dividing by 16 (to convert ounces to pounds) or by 12 (to convert inches to feet).
Measures for capacity (volume) and mass were to be derived from the unit of length, thus relating the basic units of the system to each other and to nature.

ThinkingBig
06-09-2012, 10:44 PM
I put this in this thread because this is where it belongs. For pretty much ever, BC(before Christ) has been used to denote "ancient history". I was reading up on some Roman History and they kept on referring to dates as "BCE" as in "Before Current Events". What makes this mindless moonbat gibberish is that something that happened in 1950 could hardly be considered "current events" let alone something that happened a millennia or 2 ago.

a) BCE = Before Christian Era (also Common Era, Calendar Era)

b) the notion of a Calendar era and Before Calendar era was introduced by a 6th Century Christian Monk

c) would you prefer the latin vulgaris aerae?

Hubie
06-10-2012, 12:49 AM
The BCE/CE designation for years is funny to me because it doesn't use any other demarcation than the birth of Christ, just like BC/AD. Thus, 2012 AD is the same as 2012 CE. So exactly what was the point of inventing it? It's like inventing a new name for feet or meters. "Well, we used to say 'one meter,' but now we say 'one flarnbat.' They are exactly the same, but we just prefer the new designation."

NJCardFan
06-10-2012, 12:53 AM
I remember seeing some moonbat story that referred to BCE as before current events. Even before Christian era is silly at it's core.

Novaheart
06-10-2012, 10:24 AM
The BCE/CE designation for years is funny to me because it doesn't use any other demarcation than the birth of Christ, just like BC/AD. Thus, 2012 AD is the same as 2012 CE. So exactly what was the point of inventing it? It's like inventing a new name for feet or meters. "Well, we used to say 'one meter,' but now we say 'one flarnbat.' They are exactly the same, but we just prefer the new designation."

My guess would be so that the calendar, which is somewhat scientific in nature, isn't tied to a minority cultural perspective based on an event which may or may not have happened and is completely without foundation to have happened as described by a bunch of Asian monks. It would be more accurate to divide the calendar, if we must, by an historical or scientific event.

It should be noted that many people are under the impression that the "Jewish calendar" is ancient, when it is not. The Jewish year, 5772, was arrived at the same way that Creationists and Young Earthers decided how old the world is: by adding up the generations (some of which are ridiculously long) in the Old Testament and filling in the gaps with "reasonable estimates".

Novaheart
06-10-2012, 10:30 AM
I remember seeing some moonbat story that referred to BCE as before current events. Even before Christian era is silly at it's core.

The clever thing to do for a culturally neutral designation would be to tie the calendar to a known celestial event about 6,000 years ago since regardless of which culture you are talking about, our "best" knowledge seems to run out of gas about 6,000 years ago and we then switch to ranges of estimated times for events.

AmPat
06-11-2012, 12:14 PM
The BCE/CE designation for years is funny to me because it doesn't use any other demarcation than the birth of Christ, just like BC/AD. Thus, 2012 AD is the same as 2012 CE. So exactly what was the point of inventing it? It's like inventing a new name for feet or meters. "Well, we used to say 'one meter,' but now we say 'one flarnbat.' They are exactly the same, but we just prefer the new designation."
This!

Hubie
06-11-2012, 05:43 PM
This!

The who in the what now? I hope that meant you liked what I said.

Hubie
06-11-2012, 05:47 PM
My guess would be so that the calendar, which is somewhat scientific in nature, isn't tied to a minority cultural perspective based on an event which may or may not have happened and is completely without foundation to have happened as described by a bunch of Asian monks.

*sigh* But no matter what term they use, the demarcation point REMAINS THE SAME. Thus, the whole "cultural perspective/sensitivity/neutrality" argument is wholly baseless.


It would be more accurate to divide the calendar, if we must, by an historical or scientific event.

It already is divided by an historical event.

AmPat
06-11-2012, 06:02 PM
The who in the what now? I hope that meant you liked what I said.
You nailed it. Good job.

Hubie
06-11-2012, 06:25 PM
You nailed it. Good job.

Thanks.



Wait, are you making fun of me now? :friendly_wink:

marv
06-11-2012, 06:55 PM
I grew up with "Before Christ" and "Anno Domini". If that's good enough for this atheist, it's good enough for Christians.

Why not just start the calendar with the "Big Bang" :idea:

Hubie
06-11-2012, 08:01 PM
Why not just start the calendar with the "Big Bang" :idea:

Phooey. Let's pay tribute to how DU members think and start the calendar when they think history began: January 20, 2001.

Chuck58
06-11-2012, 08:45 PM
As far as I'm concerned it's AD and BC.

Also, I grew up with inches, feet, yards, pints, quarts, gallons, pecks etc and I'm not interested in learning metric anything.

Adam Wood
06-12-2012, 03:11 PM
BCE has been in wide use by historians and theologians for quite some time (about 400 years' time). The reason for the BCE designation as opposed to AD/BC is that a careful study of a lot of historical documents tells us that Jesus was actually born, based upon our current BC/AD calendar, somewhere between 4 and 7 BC, not right at year #1. Furthermore, if the split between BC and AD is the moment of Jesus' birth, then New Year's Day would be December 25 (but for the fact that Jesus was almost certainly born in the spring and not December). In short, for the purposes of exacting history study, AD/BC really isn't a very good measure, nor, indeed, is the moment of Jesus' birth, since no one really knows quite when that was. BCE is a scientific, historical designation for the purpose of scientific and historical research. There is nothing about it that in any way disses Christians or Christianity.

The first time I heard the term BCE was in my New Testament class at my very fundamentalist Baptist university, from a professor who was just this side of a snake-handler. This man took offense at Halloween, but he was perfectly fine with the use of BCE. If there was any Christian on earth who could find a valid reason to feel insulted by the BCE designation, this man would have been it.




The notion that it is some sort of moonbattery designed to insult or belittle Christians and/or Christianity just doesn't hold up.

Generation Why?
06-12-2012, 04:24 PM
I grew up with "Before Christ" and "Anno Domini". If that's good enough for this atheist, it's good enough for Christians.

Why not just start the calendar with the "Big Bang" :idea:



It is. Spoiler alert: The majority of us hate those idiots who try to find a lawsuit in anything doing with "Under God" or "In God We Trust"