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SarasotaRepub
06-23-2012, 08:11 AM
Hmmm...how about they stink or actually want to be homeless???? (http://www.democraticunderground.com/1002846595)




Sat Jun 23, 2012, 07:53 AM
xchrom



There's A Reason Americans Pass By Homeless People In The Street Without A Second Glance

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-americans-justify-income-inequality-2012-6



Some people's willingness to accept income inequality has everything to do with their perception of choice, Pacific Standard's Tom Jacobs reports.

Psychologists Krishna Savani of Columbia Business School and Aneeta Rattan of Stanford University expand on the topic in a study published by Psychological Science:

"The concept of choice makes people less disturbed by facts about existing wealth inequality in the United States, more likely to underestimate the role of societal factors in individuals’ successes, less likely to support the redistribution of educational resources, and less likely to support raising taxes on the rich—even if doing so would help resolve a budget deficit crisis.
Thinking in terms of choice, we argue, activates the belief that life outcomes stem from personal agency, not societal factors, and thereby leads people to justify wealth inequality."

In layman's terms, we make peace with the idea that some people are destitute and others are well-off because of personal choices, rather than any possible chinks in our economical and societal armor.


*** our belief in 'personal agency' has become something more like a superstition.


Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/how-americans-justify-income-inequality-2012-6#ixzz1ycHmanTq





It's a new one, maybe it'll flush out bobbolink!!!!

Novaheart
06-23-2012, 08:31 AM
I pass by homeless people in the street because I am cold and heartless. I don't want them near me or talking to me. I make fairly large donations (relative to my means) to Goodwill and the Boley Center; if that doesn't help then I apologize for my misguided acts. We have numerous places in this place which serve the destitute with food, clothing, and shelter (as long as they agree to the rules). There is a shameless woman in my town who hangs out near the grocery store and the car wash asking for money to take her kids to McDonald's for some dinner... and she has the poor child with her at her side learning this shamelessness and technique. I gave her money once. The other night, I saw her in the gas station; oddly it had never occurred to me that she owned a car (and no, it wasn't a Lexus but it was a working vehicle).

Having said that, there is one homeless man who seeks shade regularly outside the Vietnamese market. He had a bicycle and rolled his own cigarettes (which I realize some begrudge him). He has never asked me for anything and always says "Hello" or "How are you?" when I park near him. One day I am going to drop a $20 on him as a reward for his respectful distance.

NJCardFan
06-23-2012, 01:09 PM
Soooooo what the OP is saying is that I should be ashamed because I stayed in school then made sure I was gainfully employed, paid my bills, and not drank to excess and did not do drugs? Um, OK.

Chuck58
06-23-2012, 02:11 PM
And I remember one guy, years ago, who stood at the entrance to a supermarket in Santa Fe. He had a sign, something to the effect, "Homeless, need a job."

People would give him a buck or change fairly regularly. One day, a guy stopped and said he had some yard work and would pay him 'x' dollars. The so called homeless guy laughed and said he made more than that just standing there a few hours a day. I guess he didn't spend all day, just long enough to make a specific amount of money.

I didn't believe and don't believe he was homeless. I think he found a way to make a living by playing on people's sympathy. Santa Fe is a very -extremely - liberal town, per capita quite wealthy and they have that liberal guilt about being high upper middle class to rich.

Jim54
06-23-2012, 02:21 PM
"The concept of choice makes people less disturbed by facts about existing wealth inequality in the United States, more likely to underestimate the role of societal factors in individuals’ successes, less likely to support the redistribution of educational resources, and less likely to support raising taxes on the rich—even if doing so would help resolve a budget deficit crisis.
Thinking in terms of choice, we argue, activates the belief that life outcomes stem from personal agency, not societal factors, and thereby leads people to justify wealth inequality."



Well then, I say: "Long live choice!":woot:

Chuck58
06-23-2012, 03:02 PM
"The concept of choice makes people less disturbed by facts about existing wealth inequality in the United States, more likely to underestimate the role of societal factors in individuals’ successes, less likely to support the redistribution of educational resources, and less likely to support raising taxes on the rich—even if doing so would help resolve a budget deficit crisis.
Thinking in terms of choice, we argue, activates the belief that life outcomes stem from personal agency, not societal factors, and thereby leads people to justify wealth inequality."



Well then, I say: "Long live choice!":woot:

I didn't pick up on that the first time I read the thing. Choice results in outcomes. Every person born in this country has the opportunity to choose. Maybe it'll be more difficult for some than others, but everyone has the opportunity to succeed. If they make a good choice, then the paths will open up. Make a bad choice and they won't be as readily available.

The Constitution (according to constitutional scholar obama) guarantees life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness :friendly_wink:.

The key word is PURSUIT. There is no right to happiness or success, only the right to go after it.

DumbAss Tanker
06-23-2012, 06:08 PM
xchrom

There's A Reason Americans Pass By Homeless People In The Street Without A Second Glance


Yeah. We have a certain antipathy to people who complacently accept defeat and then expect to share in the rewards of everyone who didn't. It may not be fair in a given case, but the mind follows the main chance.

Dan D. Doty
06-23-2012, 06:27 PM
Soooooo what the OP is saying is that I should be ashamed because I stayed in school then made sure I was gainfully employed, paid my bills, and not drank to excess and did not do drugs? Um, OK.

We feel sorry for someone who's run some bad luck, and most of us try to help them if we can.

But what the OP is saying is that if you spend your days stoned, your nights drunk then you should be rewarded with the same home, car and even money as the folks who worked hard to get all that stuff because they think some waste of space deserves it.

But the OP really wants is take away your stuff and give to the State ( who then decides who gets what, even if you're the one who worked/ paid for it).

Welcome to the world the Moonbats have drawn up for the rest of us ... enjoy.

Apache
06-23-2012, 07:29 PM
There is a very distinct perception of homelessness, even here...I guess unless you've been there, on the flip side, you cannot really grasp the looks...


I've been there. It ain't fun...:blue:
No I was never a street person or panhandler, but circumstances put me out everything for about 6 months...

Hubie
06-23-2012, 07:48 PM
People pass by homeless people in the streets because they know these people are just trying to score their next swig of hooch or hit of meth. A member of my former church tried to give a valuable lesson to his son once (sadly, it didn't make an impact on the boy who is now well on his way to becoming a hardcore liberal). They saw a panhandler once with a sign: "Will work for food." The son wanted to give the guy some food, but his father knew better. He tried to tell his son that the panhandler didn't really want food and was only holding the sign so that people would stop to give him money, which he would then use to by alcohol (or drugs, given the day and age). To make his point, the father stopped at a nearby McDonald's, got some food for the panhandler, then drove over and tried to give it to him. Just as the father predicted, the panhandler flat-out refused the food.

Defiant1
06-24-2012, 04:26 AM
I pass by homeless people in the street because I am cold and heartless. I don't want them near me or talking to me. I make fairly large donations (relative to my means) to Goodwill and the Boley Center; if that doesn't help then I apologize for my misguided acts. We have numerous places in this place which serve the destitute with food, clothing, and shelter (as long as they agree to the rules). There is a shameless woman in my town who hangs out near the grocery store and the car wash asking for money to take her kids to McDonald's for some dinner... and she has the poor child with her at her side learning this shamelessness and technique. I gave her money once. The other night, I saw her in the gas station; oddly it had never occurred to me that she owned a car (and no, it wasn't a Lexus but it was a working vehicle).

Having said that, there is one homeless man who seeks shade regularly outside the Vietnamese market. He had a bicycle and rolled his own cigarettes (which I realize some begrudge him). He has never asked me for anything and always says "Hello" or "How are you?" when I park near him. One day I am going to drop a $20 on him as a reward for his respectful distance.

How can anyone who lives in SW Florida be considered homeless?

SarasotaRepub
06-24-2012, 07:44 AM
Damn right bud! There is always a palm tree or Whole Foods to get under...:smile-new:

Novaheart
06-24-2012, 07:58 PM
Damn right bud! There is always a palm tree or Whole Foods to get under...:smile-new:

Not to mention that those of us who aren't homeless aren't famous for dressing much better on average than if we were. I don't know how long you have lived here, but Easter is a hoot. Hang out at the gas station or the Walmart and you will see some really old/bad suits or sport coats before or after church.

noonwitch
06-25-2012, 01:05 PM
I don't always pass them by. It depends on how much cash I have on me at the time and how scary the person looks. Sometimes I give food or money to the homeless. I give them a couple of bucks, and tell them "God Bless You". If I am coming back from a restaurant with leftovers, sometimes I give the leftovers to a homeless person. What they do with the food or money is on them.


I don't ever want to ask the question "Lord, when did I see you hungry?".

michaelsean
06-25-2012, 02:01 PM
You just feel like you are being scasmmed most of the time, and most of the time you are. Although one time in downtown Atlanta a guy said he was really hungry and I offered to take him inside the McDonalds that was right there and buy him dinner, and he gladly accepted. He was even shy about ordering too much. He was just going to order a cheeseburger. I told him to have at it and he upped it to a meal.