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View Full Version : Hospital blunders 'result in almost 12,000 preventable deaths in hospitals every year



bijou
07-14-2012, 12:30 PM
Nearly 12,000 patients die needlessly in hospital every year due to blunders by staff, researchers warn.

They say that doctors and nurses routinely misdiagnose illnesses, fail to treat patients quickly enough or give them the wrong dose of drug.

And many of the errors happen because junior doctors are not properly supervised by senior colleagues, say the academics.




They warn that the elderly are particularly vulnerable as they often suffer from a number of complicated health problems that can be difficult to diagnose and treat.

In the first study of its kind, researchers have estimated the proportion of hospital deaths that could have been prevented.


The team from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine examined the circumstances leading up to 1,000 deaths in ten NHS hospitals in 2009.

They calculated that 13 per cent of the deaths were avoidable, as they were due to mistakes by hospital staff. If this figure were true for all hospitals in the NHS, it would mean 11,859 preventable deaths are occurring every year.

The study, published in the British Medical Journal, calculated that 60 per cent of those who died were frail, elderly patients with a number of complicated health problems.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2173120/Hospital-blunders-Almost-12-000-preventable-deaths-hospitals-year-errors-care.html#ixzz20cCLAyPw

This is one reason why I have private health insurance. :blue:

SaintLouieWoman
07-14-2012, 05:06 PM
Nearly 12,000 patients die needlessly in hospital every year due to blunders by staff, researchers warn.

They say that doctors and nurses routinely misdiagnose illnesses, fail to treat patients quickly enough or give them the wrong dose of drug.

And many of the errors happen because junior doctors are not properly supervised by senior colleagues, say the academics.




They warn that the elderly are particularly vulnerable as they often suffer from a number of complicated health problems that can be difficult to diagnose and treat.

In the first study of its kind, researchers have estimated the proportion of hospital deaths that could have been prevented.


The team from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine examined the circumstances leading up to 1,000 deaths in ten NHS hospitals in 2009.

They calculated that 13 per cent of the deaths were avoidable, as they were due to mistakes by hospital staff. If this figure were true for all hospitals in the NHS, it would mean 11,859 preventable deaths are occurring every year.

The study, published in the British Medical Journal, calculated that 60 per cent of those who died were frail, elderly patients with a number of complicated health problems.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2173120/Hospital-blunders-Almost-12-000-preventable-deaths-hospitals-year-errors-care.html#ixzz20cCLAyPw

This is one reason why I have private health insurance. :blue:
You are very wise. The people in the US are so foolish to have gone along with this Obamacare thing. It's tough enough getting decent care with the insurance here the way it is. It's frightening what's going to happen after Obama gets his way.

We were lucky the 2nd time SR was in the hospital. A friend who is a nurse practitioner was in his room with me. She noticed something happening that the staff did not observe. I credit her with saving his life with her prompt attention and getting the staff to stop gossiping at the front desk and to do their job.

The problem is that nothing can solve the nature of people. No matter the system, if they want to chit chat and not do their jobs, nothing is going to change them. Maybe closer supervision will at least cut down the number of unnecessary deaths.

bijou
07-14-2012, 05:33 PM
That's worrying, that it was just chance she was there when something happened. There has been a recent inquest on a case where a young man basically died of neglect in hospital, this is what went wrong:


The medical staff who let him downKane Gorny dies following basic errors by doctors and nurses. The staff included:



SIMON BRIDLE: Consultant orthopaedic surgeon in charge of his care who failed to monitor him.

When Mr Gorny became agitated, Bridle sent a more junior doctor rather than attending himself.

He then failed to follow up the incident or check on his patient’s welfare.
ADELA TAACA: Nurse in charge of his care the night before he died.

She failed to give him vital medication or carry out important observations because she did not want to wake him in case he became aggressive.
Taaca also ‘forgot’ to tell a doctor to check his high sodium levels, despite them being the highest she had ever encountered.

She was demoted to a healthcare assistant and is being investigated by the Nursing and Midwifery Council.


PHILIP STOTT: Surgeon who operated on Mr Gorny but failed to read his medical notes.

He arranged for the patient to be sedated, removed his drip and then left without linking his behaviour to his medical condition.
Instead, Stott asked Miss Cronin whether Mr Gorny was on drugs.
He told the hearing: ‘I didn’t follow it up. I should have done but I didn’t . . . I just went home.’

VICTORIA AGUNLOYE: Locum junior doctor who dismissed the concerns of Mr Gorny’s mother moments before his death.

She said she knew Mr Gorny was suffering from a rare condition called diabetes insipidus, but failed to link this to his behaviour.
She claimed she did not check on the patient when his mother asked her to on the morning of his death because he was not her patient.


SHARON GIBBS: Nurse who failed to monitor Mr Gorny’s fluid levels after he was sedated.

She admitted she had not recorded that his drip had been taken out and lost track of his water output, leaving boxes on his fluid balance chart empty.

She also failed to link his aggressive behaviour to the fact he had not been given his medication, despite knowing about his condition.
ERLINDA EDWARDS: Nurse who carried out pre-operative checks on Mr Gorny but failed to highlight his condition to other staff.

She also neglected to detail his medication and the fact that he suffered from diabetes insipidus on a ‘communication’ sheet.

This meant other medical staff were unaware of his condition as none of them wanted to read through his substantial medical records.


DR KONSTANTINOS KARRAS: On-call doctor who was told by a nurse that Mr Gorny had very high sodium levels and was asked to attend, but failed to do so.

He also failed to pass the concern on to the night on-call doctor.

He blamed the target-driven culture for preventing him from seeing Mr Gorny.
POORIA HOSSEINI: Junior locum doctor who failed to investigate the real cause of Mr Gorny’s behaviour shortly before he was sedated.

He said that this was because Mr Gorny was Agunloye’s patient.

She said he was Dr Hosseini’s patient.

He left for the evening without chasing up the blood test results which may have provided an explanation for Mr Gorny’s behaviour.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2172642/Kane-Gorny-Coroner-blames-incompetence-NHS-staff-patient-dies-dehydration.html#ixzz20dQP36g8