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View Full Version : BREAKING NEWS: James Holmes charged with 12 counts of first-degree murder in Colorado



Gina
07-30-2012, 12:25 PM
Link (http://www.reuters.com/) Just a headline at the top of the page so far. No specific link/story yet.

Gina
07-30-2012, 12:40 PM
Several news orgs are reporting 24 counts.
Link (http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/aurora-shooting-suspect-james-holmes-charged-24-counts-murder-116-counts-attempted-murder-dark-knight-massacre-article-1.1124900?localLinksEnabled=false)
Aurora shooting suspect James Holmes charged with 24 counts of murder, 116 counts of attempted murder in 'Dark Knight' massacre


Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/aurora-shooting-suspect-james-holmes-charged-24-counts-murder-116-counts-attempted-murder-dark-knight-massacre-article-1.1124900#ixzz227nTHitU

CENTENNIAL, Colo. ó Colorado prosecutors have formally charged a former doctorate student with 24 counts of murder in the shooting at an Aurora movie theater.

Twenty-four-year-old James Holmes appeared Monday and was also formally charged with 116 counts of attempted murder.

Twelve people were killed and 58 people were wounded or injured. The breakdown of the charges was not immediately clear.

He's also charged with a one count of possession of explosives. Authorities say he booby trapped his apartment.

Holmes was arrested early July 20 outside a Century 16 theater in Aurora during a midnight showing of the new Batman movie.

Legal analysts expect his court the case to be dominated by arguments over his sanity.

Holmes was a student at the University of Colorado Denver before withdrawing last month.

LukeEDay
07-30-2012, 12:44 PM
Either way, they are going to execute him, as they should.

noonwitch
07-30-2012, 02:37 PM
Either way, they are going to execute him, as they should.


I don't know if they will execute him. I don't know CO law. In MI, a defendant can choose a jury or a bench trial. If Holmes chooses a bench trial, the judge may sentence him to life and cite mental illness as a reason to decline the DP.


Holmes is likely a paranoid schizophrenic. Schizophrenia is the one condition in which the patient doesn't always know right from wrong, depending on the state of mind at the time. I don't think a jury would care about that, but a judge might.

LukeEDay
07-30-2012, 02:42 PM
I don't know if they will execute him. I don't know CO law. In MI, a defendant can choose a jury or a bench trial. If Holmes chooses a bench trial, the judge may sentence him to life and cite mental illness as a reason to decline the DP.


Holmes is likely a paranoid schizophrenic. Schizophrenia is the one condition in which the patient doesn't always know right from wrong, depending on the state of mind at the time. I don't think a jury would care about that, but a judge might.

He is going to have a very hard time trying the mentally ill plea - And the prosecutor is going for death.

Lanie
07-30-2012, 03:10 PM
I don't know if they will execute him. I don't know CO law. In MI, a defendant can choose a jury or a bench trial. If Holmes chooses a bench trial, the judge may sentence him to life and cite mental illness as a reason to decline the DP.


Holmes is likely a paranoid schizophrenic. Schizophrenia is the one condition in which the patient doesn't always know right from wrong, depending on the state of mind at the time. I don't think a jury would care about that, but a judge might.

With the way this guy planned things out so well, I have trouble believing this is a result of mental illness. I could be wrong.

Hubie
07-30-2012, 04:16 PM
Cue the liberals to claim I'm not pro-life because I would support this guy getting the death penalty (if that's an option).

Odysseus
07-30-2012, 04:20 PM
With the way this guy planned things out so well, I have trouble believing this is a result of mental illness. I could be wrong.

The legal definition of insanity is that the defendant does not understand the consequences of their action. One can be mentally ill and still know that killing people is illegal. His premeditation should preclude an insanity defense, but that doesn't mean that he will get the death penalty. Jonah Goldberg had a great column on this last week:


Holmes & the death penaltyLast Updated: 11:14 PM, July 26, 2012
Posted: 11:08 PM, July 26, 2012







Jonah Goldberg

In the aftermath of the Aurora, Colo., slaughter, the question went forth on all of the political chatter shows: ďWill this reopen the debate over gun control?Ē


Yet the national gun debate flashed for the briefest of moments, like a round of heat lightning that fails to herald a storm, and then the conversation moved to other familiar topics. What to do about the mentally ill? How much blame does our violent popular culture deserve? Etc.
Good questions. But one debate seems conspicuously absent: Should we execute James Holmes?

Death-penalty opponents are fairly mercenary about when to express their outrage. When questions of guilt can be muddied in the media; when the facts are old and hard to look up; when the witnesses are dead; when statistics can be deployed to buttress the charge of institutional racism: These are just a few of the times when opponents loudly insist the death penalty must go.



But when the murderer is white or racist or his crimes so incomprehensibly ugly, the anti-death-penalty crowd stays silent. Itís the smart play. If your long-term goal is to abolish the death penalty, you want to pick your cases carefully.

But the simple fact is, if the death penalty is always wrong, itís wrong in the politically inconvenient cases too.

The standards of newspaper writing and civic discourse require that we call Holmes the ďallegedĒ culprit in this horrific slaughter. Thatís fine, but if the facts are what weíve been told they are, then we know this man is guilty and the jury will not have a hard time saying so.

We donít know whether or not heís mentally ill, but odds are he isnít. Indeed, criminologists and psychiatrists will tell you that most mass murderers arenít insane.

But the public debate is already caught up in a familiar tautology. What Holmes did was an act of madness, therefore he must be a madman. And if heís a madman, we canít execute him because heís not responsible for his actions. And if heís not responsible, then ďsocietyĒ must be. And we canít execute a man for societyís sins.

So: Cue the debate about guns, and funding for mental health, and the popular culture.

Well, I say enough. I favor the death penalty. I donít support killing insane or mentally disabled people who are truly not responsible for their actions, but I donít believe that committing an ďact of madnessĒ necessarily makes you a madman. But committing an act of wanton evil makes you an evil man.
Evil and madness arenít synonyms. Societies that cannot distinguish between the two are destined to get more of both.

If the death penalty is always wrong, let us have an argument about James Holmes, a man many Americans are aware of, informed about and interested in. Letís hear why the inequities of the criminal-justice system require his life be spared. Fight the death-penalty battle on this battlefield.

That wonít happen. It wonít happen in part because nobody on the Sunday talk shows wants to debate the death penalty when the case for it is strong. They like cases that ďraise troubling questions about the legitimacy of the death penalty,Ē not cases that affirm the legitimacy of the death penalty.

But it also wonít happen because death-penalty opponents understand that when the murderer is unsympathetic, the wise course is to hold your tongue until the climate improves.

It remains an open question whether Colorado will seek the death penalty. Prosecutors know that doing so would add years and millions of dollars in extra costs because opponents have so gummed up the legal works. That way they can complain about the outrageous costs of a mechanism they themselves have worked to make prohibitively expensive.

I say, let us give Holmes a fair trial. If convicted, execute him swiftly. If you disagree, explain why this man deserves to live.

JonahsColumn@aol.com

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/opedcolumnists/holmes_the_death_penalty_eAUftcr02y3fuVEqkm1iYI

Have a comment on this PostOpinion column? Send it in to LETTERS@NYPOST.COM! (letters@nypost.com)

Madisonian
07-30-2012, 04:33 PM
While not against the DP in principle, I don't know that I would be in favor of it here for the simple reason that I don't think he deserves to get off that easy.

Being in his 20's, he has a nice long life ahead of him that should be spent 23 hours a day in a 8 x 10 cell in a maximum security prison with his only furniture besides a bed being a short length of rope and a tall chair. If he wants to off himself, fine but I don't think he should be able to tie up the legal system for years, and waste a fair amount of money doing it, with appeals and everything else.

His victims and their families have to live the rest of their lives with this. So should he.

LukeEDay
07-30-2012, 04:36 PM
While not against the DP in principle, I don't know that I would be in favor of it here for the simple reason that I don't think he deserves to get off that easy.

Being in his 20's, he has a nice long life ahead of him that should be spent 23 hours a day in a 8 x 10 cell in a maximum security prison with his only furniture besides a bed being a short length of rope and a tall chair. If he wants to off himself, fine but I don't think he should be able to tie up the legal system for years, and waste a fair amount of money doing it, with appeals and everything else.

His victims and their families have to live the rest of their lives with this. So should he.

I am all for the death penalty, and think he should be executed the same way he committed the murders. I also think it should be soon and not 20 years from now.