PDA

View Full Version : 'American Taliban' Lindh seeks group prayer in Indiana prison



txradioguy
08-26-2012, 03:27 PM
INDIANAPOLIS An American-born Taliban fighter imprisoned in Indiana will try to convince a federal judge that his religious freedom trumps security concerns in a closely watched trial that will examine how far prisons can go to ensure security in the age of terrorism.

John Walker Lindh was expected to testify Monday in Indianapolis during the first day of the trial over prayer policies in a tightly restricted prison unit where he and other high-risk inmates have severely limited contact with the outside world.

Lindh, 31, a Muslim convert who was charged with supporting terrorists after he was captured by U.S. troops in Afghanistan and later pleaded guilty to lesser charges, claims his religious rights are being violated because the federal prison in Terre Haute deprives him of daily group prayer.

Muslims are required to pray five times a day, and the Hanbali school to which Lindh belongs requires group prayer if it is possible. But inmates in the Communications Management Unit are allowed to pray together only once a week except during Ramadan. At other times, they must pray in their individual cells. Lindh says that doesn't meet the Quran's requirements and is inappropriate because he is forced to kneel in close proximity to his toilet.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana, which is representing Lindh, contends the policy violates a federal law barring the government from restricting religious activities without showing a compelling need.

"This is an open unit where prisoners are basically out all day," said ACLU legal director Ken Falk, noting that inmates are allowed to play basketball and board games, watch television and converse as long as they speak English so the guards can understand.

"They can do basically any peaceful activity except praying," he said. "It makes no sense to say this is one activity we're going to prohibit in the name of security."

Joe Hogsett, the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Indiana, said he believes decisions about prison regulations are best made by prison officials, "not by convicted terrorists and other dangerous criminals who reside there."

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/08/26/american-taliban-lindh-seeks-group-prayer-in-indiana-prison/

Odysseus
08-26-2012, 08:31 PM
Wasn't he convicted of treason? Why is he still alive at all? If he wants to commune with Allah that badly, we can execute the sentence for treason and he can do it in person.

Starbuck
08-26-2012, 08:35 PM
I don't care if he prays with others.

As long as he is in prison, I'm OK with it.

NJCardFan
08-26-2012, 10:49 PM
He'll get his way. We have a sweat box for Native American inmates to commune in.

Starbuck
08-26-2012, 11:05 PM
He'll get his way. We have a sweat box for Native American inmates to commune in.

Since you're in that business, what do you think? Should we care? Would you just as soon he got a chance to pray, or is it more likely he wants something else and this is just a ruse?

Rockntractor
08-26-2012, 11:12 PM
They should arrange for him to pray together with the 12th Imam.

Apache
08-26-2012, 11:29 PM
Why is that scum breathing at all? Let alone the same air as I am :livid:

noonwitch
08-27-2012, 08:52 AM
I don't care if he prays with others.

As long as he is in prison, I'm OK with it.


He's in a unit that allows them to play basketball and board games with each other. I would guess that the Prison Christian fellowships are allowed to pray together. If that is the case, then it is discrimination, regardless of what the crime is that he was convicted of.

If the Christian groups are currently also denied the right to pray together, a victory in this case would also give them the right to do so.

txradioguy
08-27-2012, 11:59 AM
Wasn't he convicted of treason? Why is he still alive at all? If he wants to commune with Allah that badly, we can execute the sentence for treason and he can do it in person.

Conspiracy to Murder U.S. Nationals (18 U.S.C. 2332(b)) (Count One)
Conspiracy to Provide Material Support & Resources to Foreign Terrorist Organizations (18 U.S.C 2339B) (Counts Two & Four);
Providing Material Support & Resources to Foreign Terrorist Organizations (18 U.S.C. 2339B & 2) (Counts Three & Five);
Conspiracy to Contribute Services to al Qaeda. (31 C.F.R. 595.205 & 595.204 & 50 U.S.C. 1705(b)) (Count Six);
Contributing Services to al Qaeda (31 C.F.R. 595.204 & 595.205, 50 U.S.C. 1705(b) & 18 U.S.C. 2) (Count Seven);
Conspiracy to Supply Services to the Taliban (31 C.F.R. 545.206(b) & 545.204 & 50 U.S.C. 1705(b)) (Count Eight);
Supplying Services to the Taliban (31 C.F.R. 545.204 & 545 206(a), 50 U.S.C. 1705(b) & I8 U.S.C. 2) (Count Nine);
Using and Carrying Firearms and Destructive Devices During Crimes of Violence (I8 U.S.C. 924(c) & 2) (Count Ten)


Those are all the charges the little scumbag was found guilty of. And somehow instead of assuming room temperature...he's only serving 20 years and at some point will be released back into society.

txradioguy
08-27-2012, 12:00 PM
Why is that scum breathing at all? Let alone the same air as I am :livid:

Because he's a hero to the left just like Bradley Manning.

Zeus
08-27-2012, 01:27 PM
He's in a unit that allows them to play basketball and board games with each other. I would guess that the Prison Christian fellowships are allowed to pray together. If that is the case, then it is discrimination, regardless of what the crime is that he was convicted of.

If the Christian groups are currently also denied the right to pray together, a victory in this case would also give them the right to do so.

I agree. If they are already allowed to congregate to play games etc,getting together for prayer can't be much of a security risk. As long as it done during rec time or otherwise allowed out of their cells.

LukeEDay
08-27-2012, 01:36 PM
He is a terrorist, he gets no rights.

txradioguy
08-27-2012, 01:38 PM
He is a terrorist, he gets no rights.

QFT

Zeus
08-27-2012, 03:34 PM
Conspiracy to Murder U.S. Nationals (18 U.S.C. 2332(b)) (Count One)
Conspiracy to Provide Material Support & Resources to Foreign Terrorist Organizations (18 U.S.C 2339B) (Counts Two & Four);
Providing Material Support & Resources to Foreign Terrorist Organizations (18 U.S.C. 2339B & 2) (Counts Three & Five);
Conspiracy to Contribute Services to al Qaeda. (31 C.F.R. 595.205 & 595.204 & 50 U.S.C. 1705(b)) (Count Six);
Contributing Services to al Qaeda (31 C.F.R. 595.204 & 595.205, 50 U.S.C. 1705(b) & 18 U.S.C. 2) (Count Seven);
Conspiracy to Supply Services to the Taliban (31 C.F.R. 545.206(b) & 545.204 & 50 U.S.C. 1705(b)) (Count Eight);
Supplying Services to the Taliban (31 C.F.R. 545.204 & 545 206(a), 50 U.S.C. 1705(b) & I8 U.S.C. 2) (Count Nine);
Using and Carrying Firearms and Destructive Devices During Crimes of Violence (I8 U.S.C. 924(c) & 2) (Count Ten)


Those are all the charges the little scumbag was found guilty of. And somehow instead of assuming room temperature...he's only serving 20 years and at some point will be released back into society.



The court had scheduled an evidence suppression hearing, at which Lindh would have been able to testify about the details of the torture to which he claimed he was subjected. The government faced the problem that a key piece of evidence Lindh's confession might be excluded from evidence as having been forced under duress (i.e. torture). Under a plea bargain agreement offered Lindh plead guilty to two charges: supplying services to the Taliban (50 U.S.C. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Title_50_of_the_United_States_Code) 1705(b) (http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/50/1705.html#b), 18 U.S.C. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Title_18_of_the_United_States_Code) 2 (http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/18/2.html), 31 C.F.R. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_Federal_Regulations)545.204 (http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/get-cfr.cgi?TYPE=TEXT&YEAR=current&TITLE=31&PART=545&SECTION=204), and 31 C.F.R. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_Federal_Regulations)545.206a (http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/get-cfr.cgi?TYPE=TEXT&YEAR=current&TITLE=31&PART=545&SECTION=206)) and carrying an explosive during the commission of a felony (18 U.S.C. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Title_18_of_the_United_States_Code) 844(h)(2) (http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/18/844.html#h_2)). He would have to consent to a gag order (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gag_order) that would prevent him from making any public statements on the matter for the duration of his 20-year sentence, and he would have to drop any claims that he had been mistreated or tortured (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torture) by U.S. military personnel in Afghanistan and aboard two military ships during December 2001 and January 2002. In return, all other charges would be dropped....