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Novaheart
11-27-2012, 01:04 PM
SO....

I'm still looking for a puppy to adopt. There are plenty out there, but I am hesitant to deal with these people. The SPCA and Humane Society (is there a difference?) don't have any real chihuahuas. I'm not demanding purebred, but I do want it to conform in size, ie 6 pounds or less. These other "rescues" appear to be people who are making a living or a supplement by "rescuing" litters and then "rehoming" them for a "rehoming fee" that is between 2 and 5 times as high as the Pound.

I know that the right dog and moment will come along, as it always does. In fact, I know that if I mention it to enough people around here, someone will show up on my doorstep with an adorable chihuahua baby who wants a daddy. I'm just surprised at how many people look for any crack in a system which they can exploit for a few dollars.

SarasotaRepub
11-27-2012, 01:30 PM
We have a neighbor up the street who has one and it goes nuts whenever it sees the greyhounds. And I mean crazy nuts to the point where it's gotten out of its harness. Twice. :biggrin-new:

They are scrappy dogs...

FlaGator
11-27-2012, 01:38 PM
I have a chihuahua named Chico. He is about 14 year old, is blind and deaf, manages to fall in the pond behind our house once a month and we adore him. We just recently got a Shih Tzu we named Grizzly Gene because he looks like a cross between a baby grizzly and Gene Simmons (top knot and all). He is a fantastic dog with a wonderful personality.

Novaheart
11-27-2012, 02:04 PM
I have a chihuahua named Chico. He is about 14 year old, is blind and deaf, manages to fall in the pond behind our house once a month and we adore him. We just recently got a Shih Tzu we named Grizzly Gene because he looks like a cross between a baby grizzly and Gene Simmons (top knot and all). He is a fantastic dog with a wonderful personality.

My friend Ninny keeps telling me that I will regret getting a chihuahua. She says they are impossible to fully housebreak and that they pee everywhere. I find that difficult to believe, and the breeder website in Pennsylvania says that they are difficult to train, but only because they require a great deal of structure and commitment on the part of the owner. The breeders say that you start by getting up in the morning, take the dog from crate to potty-place (indoor or outdoor) and then take him there two hours later, then four hours, and so on until you have him trained to wait 8-10 hours. Sounds reasonable to me. I just don't want to screw up a dog that might outlive me.

FlaGator
11-27-2012, 02:21 PM
My friend Ninny keeps telling me that I will regret getting a chihuahua. She says they are impossible to fully housebreak and that they pee everywhere. I find that difficult to believe, and the breeder website in Pennsylvania says that they are difficult to train, but only because they require a great deal of structure and commitment on the part of the owner. The breeders say that you start by getting up in the morning, take the dog from crate to potty-place (indoor or outdoor) and then take him there two hours later, then four hours, and so on until you have him trained to wait 8-10 hours. Sounds reasonable to me. I just don't want to screw up a dog that might outlive me.

They are kind of hard to house break but I think that has to do with the tiny bladder. If you take them out often they are ok. Chico stays outside during the day and comes in at sundown. When the weather is bad and not one is home all the dogs stay in individual kennels. They know instinctively not to poop where they sleep but you can let them stay in the kennels for more than 8 hours.

The Shih Tzu is a minor problem. He understands that he can't go in the house about 90 percent of the time but about every other day he forgets. He is still young (4 months hold) so I guess he is improving

The easiest dog I ever had to house break was a Sheltie. Fasha picked it up in about a week and only had an occassion accident during the first year. After that she was good to go to be left alone in the house.

southernlady
11-27-2012, 04:50 PM
Nova...good luck at finding your puppy.

Our chihuahua's are a mix...Chihuahua/Jack Russell. We got two litter mates. They started out the same size but now, at almost a year old...there is a big difference. The boy looks like a JRT in size (he weighs about 18 lbs) and temperament. The girl is much smaller (about 9 lbs) and acts more like a Chihuahua.

Training them was time consuming but being retired, actually gave my husband something to do. And both are now housebroken. It did take time and patience but they are very smart puppies.

We also have a Border Collie/Aussie Shepard mix (also has some water dog in him).

Liz

djones520
11-27-2012, 04:54 PM
A can't abide in your choice of a dog, they're nothing but over grown rats, but just keep up the search. Try this out, maybe you'll see something you like.

http://www.petfinder.com/pet-search?pet_breed=Chihuahua&animal_type=Dog&location=Tampa%2C+FL

southernlady
11-27-2012, 05:56 PM
A can't abide in your choice of a dog, they're nothing but over grown rats, but just keep up the search. Try this out, maybe you'll see something you like.


I thought the same...til I had one. If you had asked me a couple of years ago what dog I would want, I would have said an English Mastiff.

SaintLouieWoman
11-27-2012, 06:59 PM
I thought the same...til I had one. If you had asked me a couple of years ago what dog I would want, I would have said an English Mastiff.

They're about the size of a greyhound's head. :biggrin-new:



I started out with schnauzers, but after the last one died, I vowed that I'd never have another small, yippy dog. I went from schnauzers to Norwegian elkhounds to greyhounds and finally found the perfect dog for us. I've had greyhounds for at least 15 years. Love those gentle couch potatoes.

Chihuahuas definitely have an advantage---you can take them on a plane in a teeny tiny carrier. But they're hard to housetrain, ditto small poodles. You'd think that the little guys would be easier. Our Bella Blue (greyhound) was good from the moment that she entered our lives, never had an accident in the house. And she's in the house 98% of the time.

Hawkgirl
11-27-2012, 08:02 PM
Nova, are you any where near South Florida? The rescue group I help just rescued a Chihuahua puppy that was thrown out of a moving car window. She is being treated by a vet who is donating medical help. She is a cutie. Let me know if you're interested.

Hawkgirl
11-27-2012, 08:04 PM
http://i49.tinypic.com/29lh6xw.jpg

Vet says her paw can be saved. They might even bring to you if you're interested.

southernlady
11-27-2012, 08:05 PM
http://i49.tinypic.com/29lh6xw.jpg

Vet says her paw can be saved. They might even bring to you if you're interested.
She's ADORABLE! Too bad we already have more than our share, LOL.

Madisonian
11-27-2012, 08:12 PM
SO....

I'm still looking for a puppy to adopt. There are plenty out there, but I am hesitant to deal with these people. The SPCA and Humane Society (is there a difference?) don't have any real chihuahuas. I'm not demanding purebred, but I do want it to conform in size, ie 6 pounds or less. These other "rescues" appear to be people who are making a living or a supplement by "rescuing" litters and then "rehoming" them for a "rehoming fee" that is between 2 and 5 times as high as the Pound.

I know that the right dog and moment will come along, as it always does. In fact, I know that if I mention it to enough people around here, someone will show up on my doorstep with an adorable chihuahua baby who wants a daddy. I'm just surprised at how many people look for any crack in a system which they can exploit for a few dollars.

We have 2 Chihuahuas (Max is a Katrina rescue. We live in Michigan. Rico is a local that was dumped because of an injured leg) that I would gladly send you free if not for the fact that my wife adores the little couch rats.

Since we work with rescues, let me explain why the rehoming fee is higher than the pound in most cases.

First, most rescues survive only on donations and adoption fees. They do not get any money from local, state or federal entities nor would most reputable rescues accept any money from HSUS or other "humane societies" where more money goes to executive salaries, advertising revenue and legal teams than the animals they pretend to care about.

Second, most rescues are no-kill and in their at times stupidity will take in animals with zero chance of adoption and pay for the food, care taking and vet bills for the rest of that animals life. Our rescue has had some dogs and cats for years that because of looks, temperment, age or illness will be there forever. The pound is a week and dead.

Third, even with volunteers for many tasks, the overhead cost of running a rescue is staggering. Code compliance, energy costs, transportation costs for showing adoptable animals, legal fees, liability insurance run even our small rescue thousands per year, again without taxpayer dollars to supplement.

Fourth, we will not adopt out any dog or cat that has not been spuetered and micro-chipped and most of the ones we get are neither. Even though we have arrangements with local vets, it is still not free for us.

So yes, getting Fluffy from a rescue will be more than getting him from the pound and in many cases, more than getting one from a breeder (did I mention that many rescue dogs are dumped on rescues after the back yard breeders (or ACK breeders, not that there is a lot of difference) have bred them out and we take them in?) but it is to support the larger goal of saving as many as possible.

ETA: This is what we take in that the pounds kills without hesitation...

http://www.pawsanimalrescue.net/images/Brady_at_home2.jpg

Paws got a 911 call from the police about a dog that had been hit and laying in a flower bed not moving .

Paws volunteers responded, after a couple of hours the volunteers were able to get him in a crate and transport him to an emergency vet. Brady has a punctured lung, fractured leg, severe road rash, many bumps and bruises. He was treated with xrays, pain meds, and antibiotics at the emergency vets. 2 days later he was taken to a regular vet for a recheck. His punctured lung did not get worse, Great news! He is on crate rest for several weeks so the lung and fracture can heal. His foster mom says he is a very sweet boy even thru the pain he is enduring. If you would like to donate towards Brady's medical bill and care please use the link below. A big thank you to the police that called us and gave Brady a second chance!

JB
11-27-2012, 08:32 PM
Try your local craigslist (with caution of course). May have to spend a couple bucks but dogs are offered for adoption there too.

southernlady
11-27-2012, 08:49 PM
Try your local craigslist (with caution of course). May have to spend a couple bucks but dogs are offered for adoption there too.
While our Border Collie mix is a shelter dog, his "brother and sister" Jack Chi's were adopted from a Craigslist ad....

I found a lady offering them for free...and she turned down almost 15 offers prior to mine for them...the others just wanted to get them to sell them. We wanted them as companions. Altho she thought they were "Cheagles". She had three, one went to her mom and we took two. Right now they are sound asleep on my husband's lap.

We would not trade them for the world.

Liz

Novaheart
11-28-2012, 01:46 PM
A can't abide in your choice of a dog, they're nothing but over grown rats, but just keep up the search. Try this out, maybe you'll see something you like.

http://www.petfinder.com/pet-search?pet_breed=Chihuahua&animal_type=Dog&location=Tampa%2C+FL

Foxes actually.

Novaheart
11-28-2012, 01:52 PM
They're about the size of a greyhound's head. :biggrin-new:



I started out with schnauzers, but after the last one died, I vowed that I'd never have another small, yippy dog. I went from schnauzers to Norwegian elkhounds to greyhounds and finally found the perfect dog for us. I've had greyhounds for at least 15 years. Love those gentle couch potatoes.

Chihuahuas definitely have an advantage---you can take them on a plane in a teeny tiny carrier. But they're hard to housetrain, ditto small poodles. You'd think that the little guys would be easier. Our Bella Blue (greyhound) was good from the moment that she entered our lives, never had an accident in the house. And she's in the house 98% of the time.

Buoy (the future Chihuahua) would be replacing our late beloved Edy, a toy poodle. Edy was fairly high maintenance because she had ear problems. So she needed to go to the groomer once a month and the vet every six months, and I cleaned her ears every other day. If it weren't for that and the size factor (mom couldn't lift Edy) then we'd be looking at another poodle.

The chihuahua we looked at last night was $1800. I gasped. It was adorable, but $1800 is a bit steep.

Arroyo_Doble
11-28-2012, 01:57 PM
Buoy (the future Chihuahua) would be replacing our late beloved Edy, a toy poodle. Edy was fairly high maintenance because she had ear problems. So she needed to go to the groomer once a month and the vet every six months, and I cleaned her ears every other day. If it weren't for that and the size factor (mom couldn't lift Edy) then we'd be looking at another poodle.

The chihuahua we looked at last night was $1800. I gasped. It was adorable, but $1800 is a bit steep.

Are you serious?

Eupher
11-28-2012, 05:46 PM
Good luck in your quest, Nova.

After avoiding having a dog for 30+ years for a lot of reasons, the military being one of them, I'm amazed at how much impact that animal (make that animals as Mrs E and I have two) has on my life.

They are wonderful creatures and they certainly enrich our lives.

Now, if I could get Belle to stop bugging the shit out of me at 2 A.M. I just might be a rested, enriched person.

http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i317/Eupher6/Pets/DSC_0039_edited-2.jpg

noonwitch
11-29-2012, 05:51 PM
We also have a Border Collie/Aussie Shepard mix (also has some water dog in him).

Liz


I'd guess that is one smart dog.

My dog is 14, I'll be on a puppy search at some point in the next few years. I love my dog, who is mostly norwegian elkhound (I got her from the Humane Society). When I've researched the breed, I found that they are not a common breed and very expensive, so I may have to find a different type of dog. I'm thinking about Huskies, they are cute and look kind of like wolves.

SaintLouieWoman
11-29-2012, 11:26 PM
I'd guess that is one smart dog.

My dog is 14, I'll be on a puppy search at some point in the next few years. I love my dog, who is mostly norwegian elkhound (I got her from the Humane Society). When I've researched the breed, I found that they are not a common breed and very expensive, so I may have to find a different type of dog. I'm thinking about Huskies, they are cute and look kind of like wolves.
That's why I didn't get another elkie (had 2). The local breeder had disappeared and couldn't find any in a nearby state. The ones that I did locate were way too expensive.

My vet did tell me, though, that elkhounds had easier temperaments than huskies and were way less aggressive than malamutes. At least in Michigan those northern breed dogs are more comfortable. St Louis was too warm for my elkhounds and Florida would be terrible for them. My female, Buschy, would lay on a metal loveseat out on the patio when it snowed and put her tongue out and catch the snow. She loved it.

djones520
11-29-2012, 11:35 PM
I just helped a friend bury one of his yesterday. A border collie mix that he'd had since he was a puppy. His sister will probably be following him soon. On top of that a "friend" of his just took back a black lab that he gave him last year. So it's been a bit of a rough week.

To help get over it he just bought a Chocolate Lab and a German Shephard puppy. Two very cute puppies.