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djones520
11-27-2012, 04:56 PM
As soon as we move from here and I'm no longer constrained by idiotic rules about what dogs I can own, I'll be on the look out for a Rottweiler puppy.

Not sure the best way to go about it though. I've never bought a dog before, my whole life I've only ever gotten rescue mutts. The one Rottie we did have we got for free because the owner was moving and couldn't take her with him.

So anyone have suggestions on how to start with it? What to look for with breeders, or pet stores, etc?

southernlady
11-27-2012, 05:54 PM
As soon as we move from here and I'm no longer constrained by idiotic rules about what dogs I can own, I'll be on the look out for a Rottweiler puppy.
Be careful as many homeowner insurance companies have Rotties on their do not allow list.

Dog Breeds that will Raise your Home Owners Insurance Rates (http://www.petplace.com/dogs/dog-breeds-that-will-raise-your-home-owners-insurance-rates/page1.aspx)

If you're a potential home owner with a breed of dog that is considered to have the potential for being aggressive, you may want to investigate insurance policies. These days, many insurance companies are being picky about what dogs there are willing to insure in a home owners insurance policy.

The most common breeds that are blacklisted are
Akita
Alaskan malamute
Bulldog
Bullmastiff or mastiff
Chow
Doberman
German shepherd
Husky
Presa Canario
Rottweiler
Staffordshire terrier (pit bull)
And any combination of these the breeds.

Now, I will say that the vets I know actually prefer those breeds over the tiny dogs that aren't on that list:
Chihuahuas
Yorkies
Jack Russells
ect.

They are typically far more snappish but apparently due to size, their bite isn't as damaging.

Well raised dogs of ANY breed are a pleasure to be around. I've seen Rotties better behaved than a Yorkie.

Liz

djones520
11-27-2012, 05:57 PM
I'm a renter. I won't be buying until the AF and I are done with each other.

And yes, I've been chewed on by smaller breeds, never by one of the so called "dangerous" breeds. It's bullshit. They just get a bad rap because they have stronger jaw strength, so they cause more damage when they do bite.

Smaller dog attacks aren't tracked as well because they just aren't reported.

SaintLouieWoman
11-27-2012, 06:51 PM
I'm a renter. I won't be buying until the AF and I are done with each other.

And yes, I've been chewed on by smaller breeds, never by one of the so called "dangerous" breeds. It's bullshit. They just get a bad rap because they have stronger jaw strength, so they cause more damage when they do bite.

Smaller dog attacks aren't tracked as well because they just aren't reported.
I've always preferred the large breeds, but as southernlady has mentioned, stay away from the breeds that are blacklisted by the insurance companies. After you're out of the AF, you'll still have to contend with those pesky insurance rules.

Also with 3 little kids, you'll have to be super safe. A friend of mine had a rottie who was very gentle. She lives in OK, not far from Rock. But that "gentle" rottie had to be kept in another room (locked) so she wouldn't kill my female greyhouns who were travelling with me. I used to volunteer as an adoption counselor for the Humane Society. They had rules not to adopt out dogs on that list (or mixes of those dogs) to young families. Particularly they found the chow was very unpredictable.

You might be better to look at one of the more gentle large breeds or get a really good hunting dog that might be better mannereed.

djones520
11-27-2012, 06:57 PM
That's why we will be getting a puppy, so she grows up with the other animals and kids. Obediance training will be necessary as well. Rottie's are definitely not your standard dog, they've gotta be handled differantly, but the pay off is well worth it. Very smart, very loyal, very lovable breed. And there is no other dog I'd rather have to keep my children safe.

Starbuck
11-27-2012, 07:48 PM
I do have some suggestions when it comes to picking the dog that is right.

Pick the puppy up. Hold him right in front of your face. When you find a dog who focuses on you, he is a possible candidate. Most dogs will squirm around and not even notice you. Don't get one of those.

Next, blow gently in the dog's face. The dog you want will try to bite your breath and play with you...

Those are the steps that have worked so well for us over the years.:smile-new:

G'LUCK!

Starbuck
11-27-2012, 07:48 PM
That's why we will be getting a puppy, so she grows up with the other animals and kids. Obediance training will be necessary as well. Rottie's are definitely not your standard dog, they've gotta be handled differantly, but the pay off is well worth it. Very smart, very loyal, very lovable breed. And there is no other dog I'd rather have to keep my children safe.

Black Labs.....:smile-new:

Madisonian
11-27-2012, 08:51 PM
As soon as we move from here and I'm no longer constrained by idiotic rules about what dogs I can own, I'll be on the look out for a Rottweiler puppy.

Not sure the best way to go about it though. I've never bought a dog before, my whole life I've only ever gotten rescue mutts. The one Rottie we did have we got for free because the owner was moving and couldn't take her with him.

So anyone have suggestions on how to start with it? What to look for with breeders, or pet stores, etc?

Pet stores are the outlet malls for every puppy mill in the country, so unless that is what you choose to support, they should be avoided like an Islamic terrorist wearing a heavy coat in August.
Most AKC aligned breeders aren't a lot better in my experience.
If they will sell you a dog without questions or concern, walk away. They won't care if the dog rips your kids faces off as long as they get their cash.

If you do not want a rescue, then look for a breeder that breeds "working" dogs that breeds for function, not for appearance. They will try to match the temperment of the sire, dam and litter to your requirements and situation.

Zeus
11-27-2012, 09:11 PM
Although I do have a papered English Mastiff If I was looking for a dog I would go with your basic mutt. A Labrador or Setter or Retriever mixed with something else. They tend to be a little less temperamental , gentler around kids and overall more loyal. I've also had a German Shepherd mix and a Collie that were fine around the kids .

southernlady
11-27-2012, 09:34 PM
Although I do have a papered English Mastiff
My daddy had an English Mastiff...named Mabel (not her registered name tho). She was a fantastic dog but dumb as dirt! But for sheer size, they make an excellent "watch dog". However the most deadly thing about her was her tail...it's like getting hit with a large log when she wagged it.

SaintLouieWoman
11-27-2012, 10:10 PM
Our new neighbors across the street have a huge Mastiff. She's a beautiful dog, but she's afraid and shy. We have to be very careful if the greys are outside, on leash. That dog growled at them, a warning growl because she supposedly is afraid. Bella just wants to play.

Zeus
11-27-2012, 11:33 PM
My daddy had an English Mastiff...named Mabel (not her registered name tho). She was a fantastic dog but dumb as dirt! But for sheer size, they make an excellent "watch dog". However the most deadly thing about her was her tail...it's like getting hit with a large log when she wagged it.

Titus has a tendency to get a little carried away with the tail wagging but will stop if you call his name and shake your finger at him. He is getting long in the tooth though and isn't much into social decorum so when he has to fart you either deal with it or are free to vacate the area. I quit drinking about 6 yrs ago but Titus still has a beer or two a day. :cool:

Oh yea Titus is a pussy but ya need to get beyond his size & looks to figure that out.

Arroyo_Doble
11-28-2012, 09:20 AM
I have only done rescue or quasi-rescue (taken ownership of a dog who would soon be without a home). My next will probably be a military working dog rescue if possible although the list of potential homes for war dogs is long, I believe.

I say this because I want to promote the rescue route. Since you are Air Force, you might look into the MWD program at Lackland AFB. That is where they process retiring dogs. I do not know if they have Rotties, though. We are a Malinois family.

SaintLouieWoman
11-29-2012, 11:32 PM
I have only done rescue or quasi-rescue (taken ownership of a dog who would soon be without a home). My next will probably be a military working dog rescue if possible although the list of potential homes for war dogs is long, I believe.

I say this because I want to promote the rescue route. Since you are Air Force, you might look into the MWD program at Lackland AFB. That is where they process retiring dogs. I do not know if they have Rotties, though. We are a Malinois family.

Thanks to you and Madisonian for promoting rescue dogs. I've found they are the best, might take a bit of training in some cases to correct a lack of training by the original owner, but worth it in the long run.

You must get some awesome rescue dogs from Lackland, I lived in San Antonio for 7 years and used to compete in obedience trials with my schnauzer. I never had a chance competing against some of the trainers from Lackland wo did the obedience trials with their own personal dogs.

DJones, you might try Purina Farms, but I think they have a long waiting list of dogs for adoption west of St Louis at the Farm.

djones520
11-29-2012, 11:38 PM
We'll have moved before we get a new dog. I want Anna to be atleast about a year old before I take on the task of training a new puppy.

Eupher
11-30-2012, 12:43 PM
Pet stores are the outlet malls for every puppy mill in the country, so unless that is what you choose to support, they should be avoided like an Islamic terrorist wearing a heavy coat in August.
Most AKC aligned breeders aren't a lot better in my experience.
If they will sell you a dog without questions or concern, walk away. They won't care if the dog rips your kids faces off as long as they get their cash.

If you do not want a rescue, then look for a breeder that breeds "working" dogs that breeds for function, not for appearance. They will try to match the temperment of the sire, dam and litter to your requirements and situation.

^^^^This.

The list of Rottie breeders is extensive and only by doing some homework are you going to be able to whittle that list down to something that you can manage.

Eventually, logistics comes into play at some point. You may have a bitchin' breeder up in Nome, Alaska, but getting there to visit the pup prior to pickup might be challenging.

A conscientious breeder will want to know a boatload about YOU. Your background, your intentions, your family situation, your environment (fenced yard? If not, that's a showstopper for some breeders.)

The more picky they are regarding YOU, the better your chances for getting the pup that fits you and your family best.

(There are also lots of Rottie rescue sites, and presumably you could find a pup or young dog still very much trainable.)

noonwitch
12-03-2012, 02:08 PM
That's why we will be getting a puppy, so she grows up with the other animals and kids. Obediance training will be necessary as well. Rottie's are definitely not your standard dog, they've gotta be handled differantly, but the pay off is well worth it. Very smart, very loyal, very lovable breed. And there is no other dog I'd rather have to keep my children safe.


Rotts are great with kids. My neighbors in the city had one named Max, and he was an awesome dog. Nobody messed with his kids.

He did get in the garbage cans, though.

xbow
12-15-2012, 11:39 AM
I do have some suggestions when it comes to picking the dog that is right.

Pick the puppy up. Hold him right in front of your face. When you find a dog who focuses on you, he is a possible candidate. Most dogs will squirm around and not even notice you. Don't get one of those.

Next, blow gently in the dog's face. The dog you want will try to bite your breath and play with you...

Those are the steps that have worked so well for us over the years.:smile-new:

G'LUCK!

Those shouldn't be the only criteria. Much depends on the age of the pups. Don't just choose one based on a single visit.
Go visit with them several times...watch how they interact with each other and with you.

When you see a possible candidate, get some nail polish and paint the nails on one of his feet. Then when you come back a week later you can determine which one you were looking at previously.