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Rockntractor
12-20-2012, 02:12 PM
But, as I say, there is no need for secrecy any longer. And now the poor creature is dead, it seems to me worth while to tell a little of his story, by way of showing young Americans of to-day what it is to be A MAN WITHOUT A COUNTRY.
Read More>http://www.bartleby.com/310/6/1.html
We read this story in 4th grade in a little school with 4 grades per room, one teacher all day for all subjects.
I wonder how many teachers give this as an assignment today?

Odysseus
12-20-2012, 03:12 PM
But, as I say, there is no need for secrecy any longer. And now the poor creature is dead, it seems to me worth while to tell a little of his story, by way of showing young Americans of to-day what it is to be A MAN WITHOUT A COUNTRY.
Read More>http://www.bartleby.com/310/6/1.html
We read this story in 4th grade in a little school with 4 grades per room, one teacher all day for all subjects.
I wonder how many teachers give this as an assignment today?

Very few, I'm sure. Most teachers today would applaud Nolan's initial outburst against the United States, and understand his change of heart. They consider themselves citizens of the world, you see...

Rockntractor
12-20-2012, 03:27 PM
http://librivox.org/librivox-short-story-collection-vol-017/

xbow
12-20-2012, 09:08 PM
But, as I say, there is no need for secrecy any longer. And now the poor creature is dead, it seems to me worth while to tell a little of his story, by way of showing young Americans of to-day what it is to be A MAN WITHOUT A COUNTRY.
Read More>http://www.bartleby.com/310/6/1.html
We read this story in 4th grade in a little school with 4 grades per room, one teacher all day for all subjects.
I wonder how many teachers give this as an assignment today?

Great stuff..Thanks for the link!

Not long ago I re read a couple of outstanding short stories we all had to read back in middle school. One was by O.Henry..."The Ransom of Red Chief" http://www.online-literature.com/o_henry/1041/

and the other was "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" by James Thurber http://bnrg.cs.berkeley.edu/~randy/mitty.html

classy and funny, both of them.

Retread
12-20-2012, 11:18 PM
One of the wonderful, wonderful advantages of Kindles. Fans gathering up novels, short stories and novellas that are by the early classic writers but are both out of print and out of copyright. They scan them into ebook format and offer them up en mass all in one volume for anything from totally free to maybe 99 cents.

H Beam Piper, Burroughs, etc,

Rockntractor
12-20-2012, 11:30 PM
One of the wonderful, wonderful advantages of Kindles. Fans gathering up novels, short stories and novellas that are by the early classic writers but are both out of print and out of copyright. They scan them into ebook format and offer them up en mass all in one volume for anything from totally free to maybe 99 cents.

H Beam Piper, Burroughs, etc,

My wife sure likes her Kindle

Retread
12-20-2012, 11:30 PM
BTW Rock - a little mixed metaphors there Hale's work is "The Man Without a Country". "A Man Without a Country" is by Kurt Vonnegut.

Retread
12-20-2012, 11:32 PM
My wife sure likes her Kindle

You can register your laptop on her account and read the same books there. I've got one book running on the laptop, another on my Kindle and a third borrowed from the library by the bed.

Rockntractor
12-20-2012, 11:50 PM
You can register your laptop on her account and read the same books there. I've got one book running on the laptop, another on my Kindle and a third borrowed from the library by the bed.

I do, I have it on my dell tablet too.

Odysseus
12-21-2012, 09:48 AM
One of the wonderful, wonderful advantages of Kindles. Fans gathering up novels, short stories and novellas that are by the early classic writers but are both out of print and out of copyright. They scan them into ebook format and offer them up en mass all in one volume for anything from totally free to maybe 99 cents.

H Beam Piper, Burroughs, etc,
I've got a bunch of classics on mine. Alexander Dumas' works (the Musketeers series is available as one collection, I'm currently starting the Man in the Iron Mask, and the Count of Monte Cristo), Victor Hugo (Les Miserables and The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Charles Dickens (there are a number of collections available for a buck, or free), Xenophon (Anabasis), Thucydides, Herodotus, Tacitus, Kipling, Machiavelli, Burke, Bastiat, Winston Churchill (The River War, The Story of the Malakand Field Force) and a slew of others. I've also found a few straight to Kindle books that are worth a look. If you like science fiction, try the Wool series (http://www.amazon.com/Wool-Omnibus-Edition-ebook/dp/B0071XO8RA/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1356097567&sr=8-3&keywords=wool)


I do, I have it on my dell tablet too.

I've got it on my BlackBerry (I have the Storm, with the big screen). I've busted too many Kindles in cargo pockets to get another, but when I get my Windows tablet, I'll put it on there, too.

Retread
12-22-2012, 10:28 PM
I'm trying out the Wool series. They had the first 5 in a compendium for $5.