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Odysseus
07-26-2013, 09:26 AM
July 24, 2013Legalized Prostitution: A Failed ExperimentBy Janice Shaw Crouse (http://www.americanthinker.com/janice_shaw_crouse/)

A recent National Review Online article (http://www.nationalreview.com/article/352932/legalize-prostitution-charles-c-w-cooke/page/0/1?splash) by Charles C.W. Cooke argued that legalizing prostitution is a good idea because, "There is really no good philosophical justification for forbidding a prostitute and a 'John' - 'Jane,' sometimes, too - from entering into whatever victimless agreement they so wish."

If only the world of prostitution were that simple. The sad fact is, where there is prostitution there is also sex trafficking, for when the demand for prostitutes exceeds the supply, pimps and traffickers create more supply by force.

In a 2003 study (http://www.prostitutionresearch.com/pdf/Prostitutionin9Countries.pdf), Melissa Farley and colleagues interviewed 854 people in nine countries who were currently or recently involved in prostitution. Do you think they found women, children, and men happy to have participated in a "victimless crime?" The answer is "no," they did not. Here is what they did find about the multiple traumas suffered by the victims:


71 percent were physically assaulted in prostitution
63 percent were raped
89 percent wanted to escape prostitution but did not have other options for survival
75 percent had been homeless at some point in their lives
68 percent met the criteria for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Mr. Cooke also proclaims that prostitution is the world's oldest profession; that is, all prostitutes must have chosen to be prostitutes, because it has been going on since the dawn of time. The line about prostitution being the oldest profession has always been a puzzler. If the first specialized occupation was to sell sex, how did the first johns pay for it?

Mr. Cooke mentions the "moral majority" and Christians a few times in the article and is evidently skeptical of the efforts of Christians to seek the abolishment of prostitution. Christians in the fight against sexual exploitation believe no one should be bought and sold for sex. By the way, the Bible shows that prostitution was not the first profession. In Genesis 4:2, Abel became a shepherd and Cain became a farmer. Obviously, agriculture was the first profession.

Another problem with the article is the thought that legalizing prostitution will make all the nasty consequences related to prostitution - like pimps, traffickers, and organized crime networks - disappear. Having a government imprimatur to prostitution does not suddenly make it safe and crime free.

Take a look at what happened in The Netherlands, Germany, and Victoria, Australia (http://www.cwfa.org/images/content/CWA_Decriminalization-of-Prostitution-for-Minors2012.pdf). In Australia, after the legalization of prostitution, there was a 300 percent increase in illegal brothels. The Netherlands saw an increase in the number of trafficking victims, and 40 percent of the victims were Dutch girls pimped by their boyfriends. In Germany, 63 percent of the 400,000 prostitutes were from other countries, meaning German women did not want to take jobs as prostitutes, so Germany had to import women from other countries to meet the demand of German men.

Julie Bindel detailed (http://www.cwfa.org/articledisplay.asp?id=21969&department=BLI&categoryid=pornography&subcategoryid=blitraf) all the problems seen in the Netherlands:


Since the Netherland's grand experiment began in 2000, Bindel points out that women are still abused, the commercial sex industry is expanding, prostitutes are not joining the government-funded union created to "protect" them (because they are "too scared to complain"), sex tourism is on the rise, women are being imported (read "trafficked") into the country to meet the increasing demand created by legalization, children are being exploited in the industry, and only five percent of the women signed up to pay taxes "because no one wants to be known as a whore," even if the government condones it.

Paying taxes? Yes, that is what happens when a government legalizes prostitution. Brothel owners, pimps, and traffickers, now known as "business managers," and prostitutes all must pay taxes on their earnings, because it is just another job. "Business managers" were raking in a lot of tax-free money before by engaging in criminal enterprise, and it is nave of a government to think that just because they make prostitution legal those people are suddenly going to abandon their criminal ways and start paying taxes.

Germany is also seeing disastrous results (http://www.examiner.com/article/german-s-legalized-prostitution-brought-more-exploitation-than-emancipation-to-women):


Initially, the German government thought that legalization would lead to the decrease in sex trafficking, safer conditions for prostitutes, and removal of "some of the stigma from the industry." But in reality, legalization not only increased sex trafficking of women and children but also failed to change the stigma attached to prostitution for the past few years. A study shows that the majority of prostitutes in Germany prefer to "do the job secretly because they still experience discrimination." The same study also shows that even the government agencies are not willing to broker jobs or offer retraining as they do for employees in other industries. Further, the health insurance company does not provide special health provisions for prostitutes. In terms of their rights, many prostitutes in Germany still live in poor conditions and are exploited by the pimps and the landlords who take the majority of the prostitutes' earnings.

In fact, government sponsorship helps to drive victims of sexual exploitation deeper into the shadows. Legalizing prostitution provides a government stamp of approval to the exploitation of women, children, and men - and charges them taxes while doing it.

Mr. Cooke says the government should recognize its failure to eliminate prostitution and admit legalization is the way to go. He points to an article by Jacob Sullum (http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/odious-unjust-prostitution-sting-article-1.1364301), who is mightily offended by Nassau County, New York's, public effort to go after johns in their "Operation Flush the Johns" campaign. The name alone should garner Nassau County an award. Cooke and Sullum bemoan the loss of liberty when people cannot purchase sex. Part of the reason it appears the government has failed to eliminate prostitution is precisely because law enforcement agencies do not see fit to enforce the laws.

In the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 (http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-110publ457/pdf/PLAW-110publ457.pdf), Concerned Women for America (CWA) requested a provision be added (Section 237 - commonly called the "Zurita Amendment," because it was authored by CWA's Brenda Zurita) that changes the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Report "Prostitution and Commercialized Vice" category to reflect who exactly is being arrested: prostitutes, johns, or pimps and traffickers. It is CWA's contention that when the first report is finally published in 2014, it will show a disproportionate number of prostitutes being arrested and very few johns, pimps, or traffickers.

If law enforcement all across the nation went after demand like Nassau County, there would be a big drop in people trying to buy sex. Without demand, the commercial sex industry would shrink, and the government would be winning its war against the commercial sexual exploitation of women, men, and children.

Legalizing prostitution has proved a failure in the countries that have tried it and led to an increase in crime and exploitation. Groups like Concerned Women for America will continue to fight for the abolition of the commercial sex industry, because it boils down to a human rights issue; further, it is morally right to combat modern-day slavery and the exploitation of women.

Janice Shaw Crouse, Ph.D., a former Presidential Speech Writer for President George H. W. Bush, is now Senior Fellow for Concerned Women for America's Beverly LaHaye Institute.



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It is not a victimless crime.

Elspeth
07-26-2013, 10:39 AM
Legalizing prostitution provides a government stamp of approval to the exploitation of women, children, and men - and charges them taxes while doing it.

There's the money quote. And I agree.

Artois
07-26-2013, 03:12 PM
While at the same token, the strongest argument for legalized prostitution could likely be entitled "Illegal Prostitution: A Failed Experiment". As just because we've criminalized it, hasn't slowed the "oldest profession" down much, just sent it quasi-underground. There's even some more disturbing statistics, that it's more prevalent in some locales where it's illegal than in places where it is legal.

I'm not sure what the ideal answer is...

Well, I actually believe I know that answer. Perhaps I should state, I'm not sure what the ideal implementable solution is.

Elspeth
07-26-2013, 03:12 PM
While at the same token, the strongest argument for legalized prostitution could likely be entitled "Illegal Prostitution: A Failed Experiment". As just because we've criminalized it, hasn't slowed the "oldest profession" down much, just sent it quasi-underground. There's even some more disturbing statistics, that it's more prevalent in some locales where it's illegal than in places where it is legal.

You have those stats?

Odysseus
07-26-2013, 03:16 PM
While at the same token, the strongest argument for legalized prostitution could likely be entitled "Illegal Prostitution: A Failed Experiment". As just because we've criminalized it, hasn't slowed the "oldest profession" down much, just sent it quasi-underground. There's even some more disturbing statistics, that it's more prevalent in some locales where it's illegal than in places where it is legal.

I'm not sure what the ideal answer is...

Well, I actually believe I know that answer. Perhaps I should state, I'm not sure what the ideal implementable solution is.

The solution is to recognize that the prostitutes are victims, and that the johns and the pimps are colluding in slavery, and to prosecute the perpetrators.

Artois
07-26-2013, 03:30 PM
The solution is to recognize that the prostitutes are victims, and that the johns and the pimps are colluding in slavery, and to prosecute the perpetrators.

From what I've read, that's essentially the only method which has ever proven to be effective. One of the Scandinavian countries has regularly made the news for successfully implementing a similar course. I'm not sure how we'd go about implementing that here in the states though, as the typical mindset is to prosecute the victims while giving a mere slap on the wrist to those involved in sex trafficking.

Artois
07-26-2013, 03:54 PM
You have those stats?

Yes.

Odysseus
07-26-2013, 05:32 PM
From what I've read, that's essentially the only method which has ever proven to be effective. One of the Scandinavian countries has regularly made the news for successfully implementing a similar course. I'm not sure how we'd go about implementing that here in the states though, as the typical mindset is to prosecute the victims while giving a mere slap on the wrist to those involved in sex trafficking.

The DOD has led the way with this. Patronizing prostitutes now constitutes a UCMJ offense, even if it is legal in the host nation. In addition, US law criminalizes sexual exploitation of minors, even if the act occurred outside of US jurisdiction.

The best way to reverse the mindset is to ensure that as many vice-squad cops as possible are parents and that they are trained to see the victims as somebody's child.


Yes.

It is customary to provide links when asked.

Artois
07-26-2013, 06:15 PM
The DOD has led the way with this. Patronizing prostitutes now constitutes a UCMJ offense, even if it is legal in the host nation.

That's actually great to hear, and certainly places them at the forefront of changing the mindset within the US.


In addition, US law criminalizes sexual exploitation of minors, even if the act occurred outside of US jurisdiction.

From some recent cases which have made the news, it sounds like they've been rather vigorous as of late with prosecuting sex tourists overseas. Which is certainly good.


The best way to reverse the mindset is to ensure that as many vice-squad cops as possible are parents and that they are trained to see the victims as somebody's child.

I'm not certain about that. I really think that it comes down more so to the prosecutors office. Getting away from the publicity grabbing "prostitute roundup mugshots" which are always good news feeds. Instead, focusing on proving counseling, drug treatment, etc. services to the prostitutes versus arresting them. Not to mention, that in many jurisdictions, they're still prosecuted more heavily than their Johns.


It is customary to provide links when asked.

I understand, typically do.

RobJohnson
07-26-2013, 11:11 PM
My sheriff's office does not have to worry about the crimes associated with red light districts or prostitutes hanging out in front of the casinos and restaurants due to the legalization of brothels.

People from all over the world fly in to work there for weeks at a time. They all seem to love it.

No one there is being forced into sex slavery that is for sure. Many have families. I know a few personally and their backgrounds. Many have professional careers and do this during their time off. (Think school teachers)

I think it's an "out of sight, out of mind" thing for law enforcement in my town.

noonwitch
07-29-2013, 10:18 AM
The solution is to recognize that the prostitutes are victims, and that the johns and the pimps are colluding in slavery, and to prosecute the perpetrators.



When I was a new worker in the foster care system, I was amazed when I placed a teenaged girl at one of the shelters, which at the time was located on Woodward AVE in Highland Park, in a neighborhood known state-wide for prostitution-there was even a serial killer at the time who was picking up women, offering them crack, then strangling them in abandoned buildings.

The pimps would circle the block, waiting for the girls to run away, so they could welcome them into their cars and the business. The shelter is no longer in that location, thankfully.

Women who end up as prostitutes usually didn't have happy childhoods. They learned at a young age that they could profit from their sexuality. The pimps get hold of them and convince them that at least as prostitutes, they have some choice in the matter- until they are introduced to drugs and then beaten as badly as they were by mom's boyfriend when they say no.


The things I have seen over the past 26 years....

RobJohnson
07-29-2013, 10:45 AM
When I was a new worker in the foster care system, I was amazed when I placed a teenaged girl at one of the shelters, which at the time was located on Woodward AVE in Highland Park, in a neighborhood known state-wide for prostitution-there was even a serial killer at the time who was picking up women, offering them crack, then strangling them in abandoned buildings.

The pimps would circle the block, waiting for the girls to run away, so they could welcome them into their cars and the business. The shelter is no longer in that location, thankfully.

Women who end up as prostitutes usually didn't have happy childhoods. They learned at a young age that they could profit from their sexuality. The pimps get hold of them and convince them that at least as prostitutes, they have some choice in the matter- until they are introduced to drugs and then beaten as badly as they were by mom's boyfriend when they say no.


The things I have seen over the past 26 years....

How sad.