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View Full Version : “I took three or four more steps and I fell,” he said, “The bear was on top of me.”



megimoo
10-10-2008, 02:21 PM
Father's bow shot kills grizzly attacking his son

A bloodied Ron J. Leming, 37, bends over the 11-year old grizzly bear
A Cody bowhunter in search of an elk found a grizzly bear instead in a Sept. 12 mauling incident on the South Fork......................Picture of bear

And Ron J. Leming, 37, attributes his father's lifetime of bowhunting for saving his life.

“There are not many people who could stand their ground like that, especially with a bow and arrow,” Leming said Wednesday.

“I would have been mauled way worse, if not killed, if Dad hadn't had the nerve to stand his ground and shoot that bear with his bow. There's not many people who could have done that.”

Leming said his father's shot with a compound bow severed a major artery in the bear and hit his heart. The bear then moved about 80 yards down hill after being shot before falling dead over a log.

Leming's father, Ron G. Leming, 62, rushed to his son after the grizzly's initial attack, and managed the compound bow shot as both his son and the bear were running down the hill.

“Dad had missed two shots at elk” earlier in the several-day hunting trip to the family's favorite spot, Leming said.

“The night before, Dad said a prayer for God to guide his arrow.”

Leming added that while his father had elk, not bears, in mind as he prayed, he's glad the right arrow found divine intervention.

“If my Dad hadn't been there, who knows?” Leming said. “The look the bear had, the way he was doing ... I could have done absolutely nothing.”

Leming and his father had taken their gear 15 miles up the trail from the Boulder Basin trailhead for their annual bowhunting outing. Though they had spotted a black bear and her cubs, there had been no sign of grizzlies, which Leming said was unusual.

On Friday morning they headed out from camp, located at about 9,500 feet in elevation, and spotted a good elk.

The elder Leming was standing about 30 yards down the hill when his son heard a noise behind him and turned to see the bear standing there.

“He was king of the woods,” Leming said. “He thought there was an elk in there and he would bring it down.”

Leming yelled at the bear, but it charged him.

Trying to pull the trigger release string on his bow, Leming realized there was no time to shoot the bear himself, so he moved behind a tree and began running around it to buy time. Then he ran down hill, figuring he could move faster in that direction.

“I passed my dad and I saw an arrow fly right by my leg, about two feet away,” Ron said. He realized his father had shot at the bear, but he was unsure if the arrow went home.

“I took three or four more steps and I fell,” he said, “The bear was on top of me.”

Leming was kicking at the grizzly and possibly put his hands out defensively.

“It's kind of blurry,” he said.

The bear grabbed Leming's arm and, “I felt like I was in a vice, with the power that thing had,” he said.

He managed to rise and head for a forked tree, where the bear again jumped on his back.

“It was pretty scary,” the long-time hunter said.

The bear attacked again and Leming was hitting him with his bow as well as struggling with the animal, who suddenly moved away.

“He took a few steps toward Dad, then he started walking down the hill. I told Dad to kill him, but he (bear) was already starting to check out,” Leming said.

snip

http://www.codyenterprise.com/articles/2008/09/24/news/news3.txt

3rd-try
10-11-2008, 01:30 PM
A very basic suggestion. If you're going to where Grizzly's live, whether you're bow hunting, or collecting butterflies, carry a gun big enough to kill a grizzly bear. If you're not a "gun person" don't go there. Sort of like, stay out of deep water if you can't swim.

megimoo
10-11-2008, 02:14 PM
A very basic suggestion. If you're going to where Grizzly's live, whether you're bow hunting, or collecting butterflies, carry a gun big enough to kill a grizzly bear. If you're not a "gun person" don't go there. Sort of like, stay out of deep water if you can't swim.First of all damn few handguns will even slow down a Grizzley never mind kill one .A 45/70 long gun would probably kill one if hit in the head but forget killing one with a single chest shot.Even a small caliber military rifle wouldn't kill unless it were full auto and even them perhaps not depending where it was hit !

Bubba Dawg
10-11-2008, 03:35 PM
A very basic suggestion. If you're going to where Grizzly's live, whether you're bow hunting, or collecting butterflies, carry a gun big enough to kill a grizzly bear. If you're not a "gun person" don't go there. Sort of like, stay out of deep water if you can't swim.

That's exactly what i would do whether it was legal or not. Thing is, in a lot of places, it is illegal to have a firearm at all, and in certain hunting seasons, such as primitive weapons only, I don't know if it is legal to carry a sidearm.

That said, they guy made an amazing shot with the bow.

Bubba Dawg
10-11-2008, 03:49 PM
First of all damn few handguns will even slow down a Grizzley never mind kill one .A 45/70 long gun would probably kill one if hit in the head but forget killing one with a single chest shot.Even a small caliber military rifle wouldn't kill unless it were full auto and even them perhaps not depending where it was hit !

There are .44 magnum and 50 caliber handguns handguns which are said to be capable of handling a grizzly bear. In a case of if that is the only choice of what i could have with me then heck yes I'd have one of those with hot loads.

Thing is, there is a difference between killing a grizzly and stopping a grizzly. When a large dangerous animal is close to you, you need enough energy from the shot to drop the animal as quickly as possible, i.e., before he gets to you. The grizzly that the dad killed was hit in a major artery and in the heart, and it still went 80 yards.

Most people shoot dangerous game at longer distances for that reason. A wound will take the animal down before it can travel the distance to get to them. But when you come face to face with any animal at close range, especially something as big and dangerous as a grizzly, it can be very dangerous whatever gun you have.

expat-pattaya
10-11-2008, 03:55 PM
I think if I ever have to travel in Grizzley country I will carry something. I won't debate what caliber is needed to kill one. I'd be happier with a .44 magnum than nothing. ;)

megimoo
10-11-2008, 03:58 PM
There are .44 magnum and 50 caliber handguns handguns which are said to be capable of handling a grizzly bear. In a case of if that is the only choice of what i could have with me then heck yes I'd have one of those with hot loads.

Thing is, there is a difference between killing a grizzly and stopping a grizzly. When a large dangerous animal is close to you, you need enough energy from the shot to drop the animal as quickly as possible, i.e., before he gets to you. The grizzly that the dad killed was hit in a major artery and in the heart, and it still went 80 yards.

Most people shoot dangerous game at longer distances for that reason. A wound will take the animal down before it can travel the distance to get to them. But when you come face to face with any animal at close range, especially something as big and dangerous as a grizzly, it can be very dangerous whatever gun you have.I've read stories of Indians trying to kill a grizzly that attacked them after they has killed a dear with a bow.Those damn things can smell fresh blood at great distances and come running.

The Indians know this and gut and haul the deer away from the kill site as quick as possible but sometimes they aren't fast enough .The bear came at them and the only chance they had was a lance and knives.They finally killed it after it had crippled several Indians and ripped one wide open .

3rd-try
10-11-2008, 04:00 PM
megimoo, This is the key phrase,


If you're going to where Grizzly's live, whether you're bow hunting, or collecting butterflies, carry a gun big enough to kill a grizzly bear

If I can't legally carry a weapon that large into a place where grizzlys live, I'm only going if it's an emergency. And hell no, I don't want a pistol for that job. Even though there are some that could do the job, I'd prefer a really, really, REALLY big rifle. I'm always reluctant in giving up my perch at the top of the food chain.

Bubba, you're right about that shot. Good to see it turn out so well. A grizzly is a bad mamma jamma. To remain safe, requires much respect of their ability to destroy. They have mine.

LibraryLady
10-11-2008, 04:11 PM
The comments at the site are interesting. I love this one:


Well I live and work in griz country and I find it amusing how PETA tells all the tourist coming up here to hike and camp to wear bells and carry pepper spray. How is that amusing you say, well the way we tell the difference between black bear poop and griz poop is the griz poop has bells in it and stinks of pepper spray.
saw this:


FYI in 2007, WY passed a law where bow hunters can carry a fire arm.

Bubba Dawg
10-11-2008, 04:19 PM
megimoo, This is the key phrase,



If I can't legally carry a weapon that large into a place where grizzlys live, I'm only going if it's an emergency. And hell no, I don't want a pistol for that job. Even though there are some that could do the job, I'd prefer a really, really, REALLY big rifle. I'm always reluctant in giving up my perch at the top of the food chain.

Bubba, you're right about that shot. Good to see it turn out so well. A grizzly is a bad mamma jamma. To remain safe, requires much respect of their ability to destroy. They have mine.

Bears are amazingly fast. I've never been out west but I have had several bear encounters in the mountains in North Georgia and North Carolina/Tennessee.

Now a black bear is nowhere near as big as a grizzly, at least the eastern black bears aren't, but they are still large and strong and fast. I was hiking with my wife and mother-in-law in the Smokies a few years ago, on a fairly well used trail, and almost got between a mama bear and her 2 cubs. Heavy cover. The cubs were below the trail, mama bear was uphill on the other side of the trail. Here comes Bubba.

The mama bear saw or hear me and charged down the hill and across the trail a few feet in front of me. By the time I heard and saw her, she was right in front of me. Luckily, she went to the cubs and did not go after me. Thing was, I could not believe how fast she was.

Scared the tar out of me. And, yes, they have my respect too.

Bubba Dawg
10-11-2008, 04:21 PM
The comments at the site are interesting. I love this one:

saw this:

Bear scat has bells in it. That's priceless. :D

When my wife and I are hiking back country we have bells on our packs. They drive me nuts but they keep us from surprising a bear in dense cover.

I also carry a handgun.

Good news about the law in Wyoming. I hope other states have or pass similar laws.

Bubba Dawg
10-12-2008, 10:25 AM
I think if I ever have to travel in Grizzley country I will carry something. I won't debate what caliber is needed to kill one. I'd be happier with a .44 magnum than nothing. ;)

I agree. The best gun for any situation is the one you hav with you. A .44 magnum with full house loads is nothing to sneeze at. I have never lived or traveled in grizzly country but I have read that many ther carry a revolver in .44 magnum, that new 50 caliber Smith and Wesson makes, or 454 Casul as protection. Sometimes you can't be seen carrying a long gun so it's a handgun or nothing.

noonwitch
10-13-2008, 08:40 AM
When I visited bear country (Yellowstone), I was in a group on a bus and we only went to safer areas. We did see brown bears from the bus, but the rangers said that the grizzleys stayed away from the visitor center areas. They were cute, but they were big-nothing that I'd want to mess with.


My brother went on a canoe/camping trip in Algonquin Provinical Park, in northeastern Ontario. They tied all their food up in a sack, and hung it from a tree, a safe distance from their tents. One morning they got up and found a big, long scratch down the side of the sack, and all the food gone, and they knew a bear had gotten it. That was probably a brown bear, though.


I'm glad there aren't any bears near Detroit. No lions, for that matter, either. Just pussy cats at Ford Field.