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View Full Version : Funding for Golden Gate Bridge suicide barrier approved



Lanie
06-30-2014, 11:14 PM
On one side of the debate were those who believe a suicide barrier will detract from the bridge's beauty. On the other side were mental health and other advocates, some of whom bore an intimate sense of the potential benefits of such a barrier.
One of the barrier proponents is Kevin Berthia. He stood on the precipice of the Golden Gate Bridge on a cold afternoon in March 2005. He was unemployed, drowning in a sea of medical bills, and distraught.

"I was hurting a lot," said Berthia. "I was dealing with a lot of issues, and I felt like I was dealing with them by myself."

Almost as soon as he hopped over the 4-foot barrier (which many argued makes jumping too easy) to the bridge's outer railing, he was approached by Sergeant Briggs.
An artist\'s rendering from the proposal shows the orange barrier extending from the structure below deck.

Briggs had been there before. During his 23-year career, he coaxed more than 200 people back from that same railing. Two people he wasn't able to save.

"When someone goes over on the other side of that rail, it's like having a gun to their head, their finger on the trigger, and the hammer pulled back," said Briggs, founder of Pivotal Points, a crisis management and suicide prevention organization.

"They're ready to go. The pain is great -- they see no hope."
For more than 90 minutes, Briggs listened while Berthia talked, the biting wind swirling around them. As the minutes passed, Berthia says the burdens he was carrying slowly lifted.

Eventually he decided to come back over the barrier.

"I knew things would get 10 times worse when I came back over, but I wanted to give it another shot," said Berthia, who says it took another eight years to get help for his mental health problems.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/27/health/golden-gate-suicide-barrier/

Lanie
06-30-2014, 11:15 PM
I never knew that many people had jumped over that bridge. While people can still find other places, I hope the barriers encourage people to think twice.

SaintLouieWoman
06-30-2014, 11:27 PM
I never knew that many people had jumped over that bridge. While people can still find other places, I hope the barriers encourage people to think twice.

Hopefully they will but if someone is determined, they'll find another way. We knew a lady whose husband had died. She was worn out dealing with his long bout with cancer and faced many unexpected bills. She ended taking his leftover pain meds. It was hard to deal with for her friends.

Here's hoping that barrier will get people to think it over and not give in to despair.

Rockntractor
06-30-2014, 11:40 PM
l would have to see the demographics, if a proportionally equal number of every group is jumping it's okay, if not we need to make it easier for groups with lower numbers to be represented.

noonwitch
07-01-2014, 10:16 AM
I never knew that many people had jumped over that bridge. While people can still find other places, I hope the barriers encourage people to think twice.


We get one every once in a while off the Ambassador Bridge. It's pretty rare, compared to the Golden Gate. I don't think people want to die in the filthy Detroit River.


If you don't want anyone to stop you, I'd recommend the Mackinaw Bridge. It's 5 miles long, even with security cameras, it's going to take the cops a few minutes to get there. One really doesn't even have to jump, just drive a Yugo on it during a windstorm (that actually happened-the driver was also drunk and had taken cold medicine).

RobJohnson
07-01-2014, 11:04 AM
Hopefully they will but if someone is determined, they'll find another way. We knew a lady whose husband had died. She was worn out dealing with his long bout with cancer and faced many unexpected bills. She ended taking his leftover pain meds. It was hard to deal with for her friends.

Here's hoping that barrier will get people to think it over and not give in to despair.

How sad. Depression is so common after death of a spouse and very hard to treat.

I deal with my above statement and on a professional level have dealt with several overdose situations. Every one breaks my heart.

RobJohnson
07-01-2014, 11:10 AM
[QUOTE= I hope the barriers encourage people to think twice.[/QUOTE]

So do I.

One of my past employees had a father that was not ready to leave a mental health facility after his wife left him (she was cheating) slit his throat in front of the family right after they brought him home while eating pizza. The family still goes to support meetings, it was really hard on the grandchildren. The father's parents insisted on "getting him out of that place."

Lanie
07-01-2014, 12:00 PM
We get one every once in a while off the Ambassador Bridge. It's pretty rare, compared to the Golden Gate. I don't think people want to die in the filthy Detroit River.


If you don't want anyone to stop you, I'd recommend the Mackinaw Bridge. It's 5 miles long, even with security cameras, it's going to take the cops a few minutes to get there. One really doesn't even have to jump, just drive a Yugo on it during a windstorm (that actually happened-the driver was also drunk and had taken cold medicine).

Giving people advice? Sheesh? j/k

noonwitch
07-01-2014, 02:26 PM
So do I.

One of my past employees had a father that was not ready to leave a mental health facility after his wife left him (she was cheating) slit his throat in front of the family right after they brought him home while eating pizza. The family still goes to support meetings, it was really hard on the grandchildren. The father's parents insisted on "getting him out of that place."


Why did his parents have the right to get him out of that place? Shouldn't his wife have been the one?


Unless it was a voluntary hospitalization and the parents talked him into signing himself out. A lot of people don't understand mental health problems, and think that depression that leads to suicidal thoughts and behavior can just go away with some happy pills and a few days of rest.

I'm sorry for your friend's family.