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Elspeth
07-14-2014, 12:48 AM
Son Skips Church, Father Arrested for Child Endangerment
http://dailysignal.com/2014/07/07/son-skips-church-father-arrested-child-endangerment/?utm_source=heritagefoundation&utm_medium=email&utm_term=headline&utm_content=1400712&utm_campaign=saturday

What started out as a normal Sunday morning for Jeffrey Williamson of Blanchester, Ohio, turned into a nightmare when police officers showed up to his front door and arrested him in front of his family. His crime? Child endangerment—as the authorities described it—because his son skipped church to go play with friends. He now faces up to six months in jail.

According to Williamson, the local Woodville Baptist Church sends a van to his neighborhood twice a week to offer free transportation to those interested in attending services. Williamson’s children ride the van regularly on Wednesdays and Sundays. This morning was no different, as his eight-year-old son Justin and siblings said goodbye to their father and left their house to board the van.

One problem: Justin skipped church and went to play instead.

The young boy stayed in the neighborhood to play with friends and then later ended up at the local Family Dollar store down the road. After police officers were called to the store by a customer who recognized Justin, they took him back to his neighborhood where they proceeded to arrest his father for child endangerment.

Williamson recounted his interaction with the police officer, stating, “The next thing you know, he comes up to me and he says, ‘You’re under arrest.’ My kids start crying their eyes out wondering why I’m getting arrested.”

To make matters worse, as a result of local news coverage of the event, Williamson was fired from his job and remained unemployed for a period of time.

The police action had a traumatic impact on Williamson’s children as well. “Every time that we leave in our car or drive down the street or something like that, every time they see a cop in Blanchester, they freak out and say, ‘Daddy, Daddy, Daddy, are they going to arrest you?’” Williamson said.

Child endangerment is prohibited in Ohio under R.C. 2919.22(A), which states: “No person, who is the parent of achildunder eighteen years of age, shall create a substantial risk to the health or safety of thechild, by violating a duty of care, protection, or support.” This means that if Williamson created or ignored a situation where a substantial risk of danger existed for his son, he would be liable under the code provision.

However, Ohio case law specifically requires the element of mens rea (guilty mind) in order to convict a defendant for endangering a child. Significantly, in 1997, the Ohio Supreme Court held in State v. McGee that the existence of a culpable mental state of recklessness is an essential element of the crime of endangering children under the statute. Thus, only if prosecutors can prove that Williamson acted recklessly due to his son’s behavior could a conviction be possible.

But should this case even make it to court?....

RobJohnson
07-14-2014, 01:24 AM
Once the child was found and was safe, that should of been the end to it. The kid was a half mile from home, big deal.

When I was that age I was going on four mile bike rides and our walk to school was over a mile and we crossed two highways.

Apache
07-14-2014, 02:48 AM
Once the child was found and was safe, that should of been the end to it. The kid was a half mile from home, big deal.

When I was that age I was going on four mile bike rides and our walk to school was over a mile and we crossed two highways.

Highways? Really?


so you had three fish that could walk... and you call that a highway???? ( I know how old you are:biggrin-new:)





Seriously... I'm on the same page you are...

What endangerment?

The kid did EXACTLY what we did, at that age :cold:




6 mos???? whiskey tango foxtrot?

RobJohnson
07-14-2014, 03:50 AM
It's sucks the dad lost his job. He worked at McDonald's but it did not say what his job title was, no matter what, he was doing what ever it took to raise those kids. I'm sure there are real cases of abuse that are being over looked.

JohnnyJeb
07-14-2014, 09:05 AM
There is no commonsense in liberalism.

SVPete
07-14-2014, 10:08 AM
The conversation with the police officer should have gone something like this:

Police officer: Is this your son?

Father: Yes.

Police officer: He was found several blocks away, unattended.

Father: Oh? I sent him to church in the church van.

Police officer: He didn't get on. Next time be with him until he gets on. And maybe attend with him.

Father: OK

Police officer: Have a nice day.

Father: Thank you officer!

Lanie
07-14-2014, 10:19 AM
It's sucks the dad lost his job. He worked at McDonald's but it did not say what his job title was, no matter what, he was doing what ever it took to raise those kids. I'm sure there are real cases of abuse that are being over looked.

There are real cases of abuse being purposely overlooked. I don't see why they can't let this go and then see if it keeps happening. BTW, if I had done that, my mom would have whipped the crap out of me (or scared the crap out of me with the prospect of one). I might have thought twice after that.

DumbAss Tanker
07-14-2014, 11:06 AM
The only way this makes any kind of sense is if the father has a huge track record with the local authorities already, and this was one of those 'Last straw' deals...even then, it sounds like a piss-poor case for the Prosecutor to choose for his Stalingrad moment.

noonwitch
07-14-2014, 12:56 PM
Total over-reaction on the cops' part.

Where's mom? Is she using the police and the child protection system to get even with a dad who got custody over her? Women do crap like that to dads who have custody all the time.

NJCardFan
07-14-2014, 01:28 PM
Once the child was found and was safe, that should of been the end to it. The kid was a half mile from home, big deal.

When I was that age I was going on four mile bike rides and our walk to school was over a mile and we crossed two highways.

I was the same. We used to go hiking in the woods near my house all the time. No one died or got hurt too badly(scrapes, scratches, insect bites). We were also left home alone a lot as my parents were divorced and we lived with my dad who was a cop who worked shift work. Again, nothing bad ever happened. Hell, we never locked our doors. Today, something like this is a product of an overreaching government.

NJCardFan
07-14-2014, 01:29 PM
It's sucks the dad lost his job. He worked at McDonald's but it did not say what his job title was, no matter what, he was doing what ever it took to raise those kids. I'm sure there are real cases of abuse that are being over looked.

Tell my something I don't know.

Rockntractor
07-14-2014, 01:52 PM
Common sense needs to be redefined, this officer was using the sense common to people today, this would be the sort of 'sense' prevalent today that we see in every branch of government and bureaucracy.
Perhaps we need to develop uncommon sense today.

Retread
07-14-2014, 05:37 PM
"Common sense" is nowhere near as common as it used to be........

Elspeth
07-15-2014, 11:19 AM
And here's another story just like it:

Mother jailed for letting her daughter play unsupervised in a park
http://americanthinker.com/blog/2014/07/mother_jailed_for_letting_her_daughter_play_unsupe rvised_in_a_park.html

A South Carolina mother is in jail because she allowed her 9 year old daughter to play in a park - unsupervised.

Hit and Run:



Hours at a time? At a park? In the summer? Gosh! That certainly sounds normal and fun like a reason to throw a mom in jail—and place the child in state custody.

Here are the facts: Debra Harrell works at McDonald's in North Augusta, South Carolina. For most of the summer, her daughter had stayed there with her, playing on a laptop that Harrell had scrounged up the money to purchase. (McDonald's has free WiFi.) Sadly, the Harrell home was robbed and the laptop stolen, so the girl asked her mother if she could be dropped off at the park to play instead.

Harrell said yes. She gave her daughter a cell phone. The girl went to the park—a place so popular that at any given time there are about 40 kids frolicking—two days in a row. There were swings, a "splash pad," and shade. On her third day at the park, an adult asked the girl where her mother was. At work, the daughter replied.

The shocked adult called the cops. Authorities declared the girl "abandoned" and proceeded to arrest the mother.

Watch the news: It sounds like Debra Harrell committed a serious, unconscionable crime. The reporter looks ready to burst with contempt. But what are the facts? She let her daughter play at the park for several hours at a time—like we did as kids. She gave her a daughter a phone if she needed to call. Any "danger" was not only theoretical, it was exceedingly unlikely.

But, "What if a man would've come and snatched her?" said a woman interviewed by the TV station.

To which I must ask: In broad daylight? In a crowded park? Just because something happened on Law & Order doesn't mean it's happening all the time in real life. Make "what if?" thinking the basis for an arrest and the cops can collar anyone. "You let your son play in the front yard? What if a man drove up and kidnapped him?" "You let your daughter sleep in her own room? What if a man climbed through the window?" etc.

These fears pop into our brains so easily, they seem almost real. But they're not. Our crime rate today is back to what it was when gas was 29 cents a gallon, according to The Christian Science Monitor. It may feel like kids are in constant danger, but they are as safe (if not safer) than we were when our parents let us enjoy the summer outside, on our own, without fear of being arrested.



The fear that our children are at risk is real. It's the danger that is overblown. When I was 9 years old, my friends and I would meet at a park about 3 blocks from my house and play baseball all day - from 9 in the AM until 5. In the fall we'd play football. The thought that we needed parental supervision never crossed our minds.

Today, we have become a nation of "Helicopter Parents," hovering over our children, planning their day down to the minute. We tell them when to be creative, when to be serious, and when they are allowed to run around and play. We obsess about our parenting skills; it's all about me. Am I doing it right? What more could I be doing to raise my child correctly?

Our children are growing up less independent than previous generations. We are cocooning them to protect them from horrible things like thinking creatively on their own, or participating in competitive endeavors where there's a chance they will lose. No one knows what kind of adults these kids will make, but if college campuses are any indication, these helicopter children are becoming scared, timid, dependent adults who don't know what to do if things aren't going 100% their way.

I think of Charles Adams going abroad with his father John to Paris at the age of 9. He went to school on the continent and then returned to America later that year by himself. I wonder how many parents today would let their 9 year old kid travel alone around Europe and then take passage back to America by themselves.