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Retread
07-15-2014, 06:53 PM
I have often had the thoughts that the language - broken English - was intentional but did not consider just how intentional,


Here (http://research.microsoft.com/pubs/167719/WhyFromNigeria.pdf) is a Microsoft research paper on the subject.


The Abstract:
The scam involves an initial email campaign which has almost zero cost per recipient. Only when potential victims respond does the labor-intensive and costly effort of following up by email (and sometimes phone) begin. In this view everyone who enters into email communication with the scammer is “attacked” (i.e., engenders a cost greater than zero). Of these, those who go the whole distance and eventually send money are true positives, while those who realize that it is a scam and back out at some point are false positives.

If we assume that the scammer enters into email conversation (i.e., attacks) almost everyone who responds his main opportunity to separate viable from non-viable users is the wording of the original email. If the goal is to attack as many people as possible, then the email should be designed to lure as many as possible. However, we’ve seen that attacking the maximum number of people does not maximize profit. Operating at the OOP involves attacking only the most likely targets. Who are the most likely targets for a Nigerian scammer? Since the scam is entirely one of manipulation he would like to attack (i.e., enter into correspondence with) only those who are most gullible. They also need, of course, to have money and an absence of any factors that would prevent them from following through all the way to sending money.

Since gullibility is unobservable, the best strategy is to get those who possess this quality to self-identify. An email with tales of fabulous amounts of money and West African corruption will strike all but the most gullible as bizarre. It will be recognized and ignored by anyone who has been using the Internet long enough to have seen it several times. It will be figured out by anyone savvy enough to use a search engine and follow up on the auto-complete suggestions. It won’t be pursued by anyone who consults sensible family or friends, or who reads any of the advice banks and money transfer agencies make available. Those who remain are the scammers' ideal targets. They represent a tiny subset of the overall population. In the language of our analysis the density of viable victims, d, is very low: perhaps 1-in-10,000 or 1-in-100,00 or fewer will fall for this scam.

Rockntractor
07-15-2014, 07:05 PM
and then their is the Kenyan scam that over 50% of the US population fell for.

Retread
07-15-2014, 07:38 PM
and then their is the Kenyan scam that over 50% of the US population fell for.

Well..... Over 50% of the folks who actually went to the polls.

RobJohnson
07-15-2014, 08:57 PM
Someone with a pig persona on facebook keeps sending me private messages that he is in big trouble and needs my debit card number to get out of jail. His truck was overweight from hauling too many Krispy Kermes.

Retread
07-15-2014, 09:21 PM
Someone with a pig persona on facebook keeps sending me private messages that he is in big trouble and needs my debit card number to get out of jail. His truck was overweight from hauling too many Krispy Kermes.

:pig::rotfl::rotfl::rotfl: