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Elspeth
08-01-2014, 03:10 PM
There's some idea that this might be connected with the NSA revelations. However, a non-American in such a high military position seems like a watershed--and a negative portent.

German officer to serve as U.S. Army Europe's chief of staff
http://www.armytimes.com/article/20140731/NEWS08/307310070/German-officer-serve-U-S-Army-Europe-s-chief-staff


A German Army brigadier general who recently served with NATO forces in Afghanistan is assuming duties as the chief of staff of U. S. Army Europe, the first time a non-American officer has held that position.

Brig. Gen. Markus Laubenthal, most recently the commander of Germany’s 12th Panzer Brigade in Amberg, and chief of staff of Regional Command North, International Security Assistance Force Afghanistan, will be stationed at USAREUR headquarters, Wiesbaden, Germany. He could report to duty as early as Monday.

Laubenthal also has served as military assistant to the deputy commander of operations and assistant chief of staff of operations for NATO forces in Kosovo.

As the major staff assistant to USAREUR commander Lt. Gen. Donald Campbell, Laubenthal will synchronize the command’s staff activities much as American predecessors have in the past.

“This is a bold and major step forward in USAREUR’s commitment to operating in a multinational environment with our German allies,” said Campbell.

“U. S. and German senior military leaders have been serving together in NATO’s International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan for years. Sustaining the shared capability from this experience will benefit both the U. S. and German armies,” said Campbell who has headed the Army’s largest and oldest overseas command since 2012....

txradioguy
08-02-2014, 07:37 AM
Perhaps it's just me...but this is a bad idea.

DumbAss Tanker
08-02-2014, 12:32 PM
Meh. 'Chief of Staff' is still just a staff position, not a command one. From Division staffs upward, there are allied officers from NATO integrated into staff positions and not just as liaison officers, not many, but they're around and if you work at that level, you'll run into them. Senior Bundeswehr officers are so politically correct that they'd fit right into the Beltway circuit. I don't see much in this to worry about in direct terms, but indirectly I see it as a portent of edging even more US forces out of Europe over time, to the point that the US gives up on anything but a symbolic participation in NATO, with an order of battle more or less like US Army South and its joint/combined HQ, US Southern Command...a paper force of units that are elsewhere but supposedly available in emergencies and unmobilized Reserve and Guard formations whose readiness and actual availability are completely unpredictable more than six months out.

Elspeth
08-03-2014, 12:43 AM
Meh. 'Chief of Staff' is still just a staff position, not a command one. From Division staffs upward, there are allied officers from NATO integrated into staff positions and not just as liaison officers, not many, but they're around and if you work at that level, you'll run into them. Senior Bundeswehr officers are so politically correct that they'd fit right into the Beltway circuit. I don't see much in this to worry about in direct terms, but indirectly I see it as a portent of edging even more US forces out of Europe over time, to the point that the US gives up on anything but a symbolic participation in NATO, with an order of battle more or less like US Army South and its joint/combined HQ, US Southern Command...a paper force of units that are elsewhere but supposedly available in emergencies and unmobilized Reserve and Guard formations whose readiness and actual availability are completely unpredictable more than six months out.

Thanks for your take on this. I didn't quite know what to make of it.