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View Full Version : Laura Ingraham, The Day After: Lessons Learned



ralph wiggum
11-05-2008, 09:22 PM
First, let no one tell you that this election was a failure of conservatism--it was the product of failed Republican leadership. Conservatism gave way to "compassionate" big-government Republicanism, which failed big time. Too many on Capitol Hill abandoned first principles like fiscal discipline, and failed to connect with middle class economic anxiety that has been brewing for two years, not two months. When one loses one's sense of purpose, so too goes moral clarity and credibility.

Despite all this, and despite Obama's huge money and media advantage, 56 million Americans still pulled the lever for the Republican ticket. That is not nothing. It certainly is a base we can build on.

Second, we are moving into a new era that demands new leadership. You who were not lulled into complacency and stood for conservatism are going to have more influence over the GOP going forward than you've had during the Bush years. So take heart.

Third, after Inauguration Day, President Obama will have to finally start making some hard choices that no liberal has had to make. Is he really willing to trash the economy in an effort to stop global warming? Is he really willing to let terrorists reign in the Middle East? Is he really willing to go along with the casual anti-Americanism of most Europeans? If he does, his popularity will erode quickly. Conservatives, in the meantime, will be rebuilding, and refreshing their message and messengers.

Fourth, communications skills matter. Laugh all you want about Obama's soaring rhetoric (and we do), there is no doubt that we got beaten in the PR department. We must cultivate a new generation of leaders who are both proud of their conservative beliefs and comfortable articulating them with vision, clarify and optimism.

Fifth, too many Americans -- younger people especially -- don't understand conservatism. Obama advertised everything under the sun (health care, tax cuts, expanded government services, compassionate judges, peace in our time). Those who've never learned the basics of American history or conservative philosophy have a hard time grasping how anyone could oppose this bill of goods. Part of the answer is taking back our schools and universities. We also need to stop relying on ineffective slogans ("legislating from the bench," "class warfare," "socialism!") and start conveying broader principles and truths through direct, pithy language.

Let the rebuilding begin!

Lager
11-05-2008, 10:00 PM
I agree, especially with the communication part. None of the recent candidates have done anything to defend or help define conservatism to new, younger voters. We have writers like George Will, but no one in politics. Every time in the last 12 years, when the democrats assailed tax policies as a give away to the rich, no one had the balls to explain the fallacy of that accuasation. Who are the conservative leaders? At least liberals can look to Pelosi and Kennedy, but who are ours? Newt? Who else?
Maybe some new blood like Pawlenty will rise to lead. I hope so, because if the dems follow the same path they followed after their major victory in 1964, when they launched the great society programs, we need to be ready.

Hawkgirl
11-05-2008, 11:16 PM
I get a good feeling about Bobby Jindal, he's well spoken and young. Someone who can educate the public about the roots of conservatism and why it IS the better way to a healthy nation.

GenYConservative
11-06-2008, 05:20 AM
I get a good feeling about Bobby Jindal, he's well spoken and young. Someone who can educate the public about the roots of conservatism and why it IS the better way to a healthy nation.
+1 on Jindal. From what I've seen of him, he is a VERY bright and well spoken person, who holds true conservative ideals.

Joe Q. Public hears "Republican Party", and they think "Old gray haired white man" party. As untrue as it is, its all about perception here.

I did tell my parents last night in a semi-joking manner, when the commentators were talking about how Conservativism needs a new young face, that 2 years from now I will be 25, which is the legal minimum age to be a member of the House of Representatives... :p

marinejcksn
11-06-2008, 05:39 AM
+1 on Jindal. From what I've seen of him, he is a VERY bright and well spoken person, who holds true conservative ideals.

Joe Q. Public hears "Republican Party", and they think "Old gray haired white man" party. As untrue as it is, its all about perception here.

I did tell my parents last night in a semi-joking manner, when the commentators were talking about how Conservativism needs a new young face, that 2 years from now I will be 25, which is the legal minimum age to be a member of the House of Representatives... :p

Gearing for a House run, Gen? ;)

Second that also on Jindal, he's good. The only thing I don't like is his extremely pro-life stance, it's the same thing I disliked about Palin. I'm against abortion but I think it's none of government's business (except for partial-birth, that should be outlawed imo).

Also contemplating a run for Congress when I retire from the Corps, I'll be 38 so that's still young right? :p