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ginad3248
11-09-2008, 12:05 AM
looking for some good books to read on the constitution anyone have any suggestions??
would like to start reading some books on the history of our country.
Guess I should have paid more attention in my History classes........

linda22003
11-09-2008, 12:47 PM
Start with the Federalist Papers, and see the thought process that went into it, as it was happening.

noonwitch
11-10-2008, 09:54 AM
In the bargain section at Barnes and Noble, you can usually find a copy of the Constitution in book form. I gave my Grandpa a copy of it one year for his birthday.

ltjvt1026
11-10-2008, 01:46 PM
looking for some good books to read on the constitution anyone have any suggestions??
would like to start reading some books on the history of our country.
Guess I should have paid more attention in my History classes........

"Men in Black" by "the Great One",Mark Levin
"Not a Suicide Pact,the Constitution in a Time of ational Emergency" Richard A. Posner
Not a book about the Constitution,but it shows where we're heading, "the Road to Serfdom" F.A. Hayek

wiegenlied
11-11-2008, 05:27 AM
I read Federalist Paper, Thomas Paine's, Benjamin Franklin's, Thomas Jefferson's, and Founding Fathers: The Essential Guide to the Men Who Made America

ginad3248
11-11-2008, 07:26 PM
Thanks for the suggestions. if anyone has any other "suggested reading" on politics/goverment please reply.Thanks!!!

Molon Labe
11-11-2008, 08:03 PM
Judge Andrew Napolitano - "Constitutional Caos" And then "Nation of Sheep";)
He's a strict constitutionalist.

megimoo
11-11-2008, 08:20 PM
Thanks for the suggestions. if anyone has any other "suggested reading" on politics/goverment please reply.Thanks!!!

The American Revolution: It's start in Boston and spread through out the colonies !

Try reading about some of the events that led up to the revolt in various parts of the original thirteen colonys.The mood and feelings of the people in Boston just before the initial acts of disobedience to the English rule.How England took a formerly loyal people who's leaders were mostly English born and loyal to the crown and turned them into a rebelous and angry crowd.One book to start is 'Three Men of Boston by John R. Galvin,

'Three Men of Boston .A Review :

Author John R. Galvin explores the personalities of three key figures whose actions and discourses constituted the roots of the American Revolution. Galvin's admirable scholarly discipline and his keen analysis deserve praise. His scope is very precise: it begins and ends with the period where Hutchinson, Adams, and Otis were interacting. Readers interested in Hutchinson, Adams, or Otis should read this book to gain a deeper insight into their personal philosophies and into the political struggles and challenges which made or defeated them, and which ultimately constituted the unyielding backdrop of their social existence and historical judgement. Readers interested in mid-18th century Massachussetts or American politics will learn much about the many groups and organizations of the period.
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James Otis the pre-Revolutionist - 1903 ,by John Clark Ridpath .

Two other, better references for those interested in the legacy of James Otis, might want to try "Three Men of Boston" by John Galvin, and the Library of America book of "American Speeches" by Ted Widmer. Both are excellent sources.

Through my far removed grandfather James Otis, my family goes back to the American Revolution - which is the primary reason I had for buying the book. This book has photographs, one of James himself, which, taken in tandem with the other book "James Otis - the pre-revolutionist" by G Mercer Adam and John Clarke Ridpath, make a good pair thus far in my searches. I have also ordered "Orators of the American Revolution" which I understand gives reference to him also.

It has taken me awhile indeed, to to become interested in my ancestor - well into the mature stages of my life. It is a major regret for me that I took so long to honor him. This man, by the sheer courage of his convictions, backed by no one at the time, was one of the major catalysts for the American Revolution. John Adams was witness to the speech against the "Writs of Assistance" which were broad-power based search warrants. (Being such witness quite probably fanned the flame of Adam's own emerging sentiments toward supporting the American Revolution.) James Otis, acting as a legal counsel was to argue FOR the writs, but his true feelings found outlet and he did an amazing "about-face" that could have cost him his neck, and argued "against" them. Quite possibly, he coined the phrase "A man's home is his Castle", since it appears that way within the speech denouncing the "writs". If anyone is interested in this truly great American, I highly recommend reading the speech itself in "American Speeches" by Ted Widner.

Mercer Adam and John C. Ridpath don't possess the literary power of a David McCullough, thus these dedicated reference books will never give Otis the historical recognition he surely merits - but they are a wonderful reference for persons interested in this great American - and they are to be commended for writing them. Personally, I would hope his story someday will attract the attention of an historian of McCullough's calibre because it reads better than any fiction. Otis ultimately would have lost his position over the resulting furor after his very public stand against the writs, which happened in the court room itself - but he did not give them a chance, "renouncing" his position instead. In retrospect, considering the immense courage THAT took, when his very neck was on the line, is truly astounding, perhaps even more courageous than the Revolutionist movement itself, since it pre-dated it, and this man had little or no backing of friends when he spoke out, as did the signers of the Declaration. This made his stand, in my eyes, even more remarkable.

Further, he actually lost his mind eventually, which may have been directly related to the stress of the "times that try men's souls" (Tom Paine) or perhaps to other causes not readily diagnosed or helped by medicine in those early times. Mental illness was of course, looked upon much differently by society then too, and this may be one reason why this courageous man never received the historical attention he so richly deserved.

Rest high on that mountain, James Otis. You will some day be remembered for the contribution you made to this great land, before the decision to revolt had been fully formed in the minds and hearts of your fellow countrymen.
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megimoo
11-11-2008, 08:23 PM
Cradle of Violence: How Boston's Waterfront Mobs Ignited the American Revolution

Editorial Reviews:They did the dirty work of the American Revolution

Their spontaneous uprisings and violent actions steered America toward resistance to the Acts of Parliament and finally toward revolution. They tarred and feathered the backsides of British customs officials, gutted the mansion of Lieutenant Governor Thomas Hutchinson, armed themselves with marline spikes and cudgels to fight on the waterfront against soldiers of the British occupation, and hurled the contents of 350 chests of British East India Company tea into Boston Harbor under the very guns of the anchored British fleet.

Cradle of Violence introduces the maritime workers who ignited the American Revolution: the fishermen desperate to escape impressment by Royal Navy press gangs, the frequently unemployed dockworkers, the wartime veterans and starving widows--all of whose mounting "tumults" led the way to rebellion. These were the hard-pressed but fiercely independent residents of Boston's North and South Ends who rallied around the Liberty Tree on Boston Common, who responded to Samuel Adams's cries against "Tyranny," and whose headstrong actions helped embolden John Hancock to sign the Declaration of Independence. Without the maritime mobs' violent demonstrations against authority, the politicians would not have spurred on to utter their impassioned words; Great Britain would not have been provoked to send forth troops to quell the mob-induced rebellion; the War of Independence would not have happened.

One of the mobs' most telling demonstrations brought about the Boston Massacre. After it, John Adams attempted to calm the town by dismissing the waterfront characters who had been killed as "a rabble of saucy boys, negroes and mulattoes, Irish teagues, and outlandish jack tars." Cradle of Violence demonstrates that they were, more truly, America's first heroes.

From the Inside Flap
Before John Adams and John Hancock, beforethe Sons of Liberty and the Committees of Correspondence, before Paul Revere's midnight ride, there were the rebellious maritime poor of Boston. Although these fishermenand merchant seamen had sweated and died to produce the vast wealth of America's preeminent port, they were cut off from its benefits. Impressed by the Royal Navy and slaughtered in Great Britain's imperial wars, they were the first to feel the pain and privation of the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, and other measures imposed by Parliament and King George III. And they were the first to take violent action against them.

Cradle of Violence tells the story of these sailors and their families and the rest of the oppressed maritime populace: the exploited apprentices and runaway slaves, the career smugglers and sometime pirates, the laid-off dockworkers and seasonal ropewalk spinners. Casually dismissed by political leaders, but with a salty heritage of crewing and fighting together against all challengers, they were the ones with the down and dirty strength to gather in the streets of Boston and resist the authority of the British Empire.

Bourne demonstrates that galvanizing events such as the destructive Stamp Act riots, theBoston Massacre, and the Boston Tea Party could not have happened anywhere else in America. He shows how independent-minded merchants and ambitious craftsmen like Samuel Adams and Paul Revere made common cause with waterfront workers like cordwainer Ebenezer Mackintosh and Captain Henry Smith. In a communal rage, they started a sea swell of opposition to Great Britain that ultimately engulfed the land, resulting in the "shot heard 'round the world" of 1775.

The names of those rioters from Boston's North and South Ends don't appear on the Declaration of Independence or in the roll of delegates to the Continental Congress. These working-class rebels are more likely to show up on the list of seamen liberated from the town's jails at the time of the waterfront uprisings—on the rosters of those who died in the Boston Massacre—or in the pages of Cradle of Violence.
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Samuel Adams:American patriot and Ringleader of the American Revolution !

Part 1: Early Years
The name that comes to mind for most people who talk about the American Revolution is Samuel Adams. Described as a firebrand, a revolutionary, and a patriot, the young Adams was perhaps the most vocal of his generation to demand independence from Great Britain. He believed in the higher cause of independence, and he didn't often let laws that he thought unjust stand in his way.

Born in Quincy, Mass., in 1722, in the same neighborhood that produced his cousin, the future President John Adams, and John Hancock, who bankrolled much of the Revolution, Samuel Adams grew up in a family that was respected and privileged. After an unremarkable childhood, he went to Harvard University and then to law school. Not finding it to his liking (or to his mother's liking), Samuel turned to business. He wasn't much good at that either and managed to lose all the money his father had given him.

Now that he was free of his parents' obligations, he turned to the thing that he really loved: politics. He proved quite good at it, too, especially at making speeches and working long hours in the name of the causes he believed in. He published articles in newspapers. He wrote broadsheets with his views. He led meetings in taverns and houses, all demanding the right for Americans to govern themselves. When the British government announced in 1763 that it would begin to tax America's trade, the response was swift and defiant, with a statement written by Samuel Adams. It said, in part,

"If our trade may be taxed, why not our lands? Why not the produce of our lands, and every thing we possess, or use? This we conceive annihilates our charter rights to govern and tax ourselves."

Adams gained much fame for his actions and for this statement. He was soon at the center of the patriotic movement, the drive for America to have its own representation in the British government, the drive to avoid "taxation without representation," and what became the drive for independence. He also formed what came to be called the Country Party, which included farmers who supported his ideas.

He was also, during this time, a founder and major player in the activities of the Sons of Liberty, a secret organization designed to foster the cause of independence. It was this group that participated in the Boston Tea Party.
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megimoo
11-11-2008, 08:23 PM
John Hancock: Merchant King and American Patriot

Editorial Reviews
From Publishers Weekly
In a biography awash in early American history, Unger celebrates the career of John Hancock, whose life was as large as his legendary signature. A successful merchant and accomplished politician, Hancock became the first signatory of the Declaration of Independence by virtue of his election as president of the Continental Congress.

And when he served as a delegate to the Federal Convention of 1787, it was his suggestion to entertain amendments to the proposed Constitution that later became the basis for the Bill of Rights. Hancock lived at the center of late 18th-century Boston politics and commerce, and his life is an engaging prism through which to view Revolutionary New England.

Unger, a journalist and a biographer of Noah Webster, effectively uses letters, newspaper articles and first-hand accounts by Hancock and other preeminent Americans to make immediate the events and controversiesAthe Stamp Act, the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea PartyAthat culminated in the Revolutionary War.

He adds a human and remarkably contemporary impression of the rough-and-tumble nature of revolutionary politics through his descriptions of the innuendo and outright attacks directed at Hancock by fellow Bostonian Samuel Adams (though to better understand Adams's enmity, more discussion of the nuances of the men's respective political views would have been useful).

Unger devotes substantial energy to Hancock's private life and habits (Hancock's fondness for almost regal accoutrements was controversial), but his marriage to Dorothy Quincy, as handled by Unger, remains frustratingly enigmatic.

Review
In a biography awash in early American history, Unger celebrates the career of John
Hancock, whose life was as large as his legendary signature. A successful merchant and
accomplished politician, Hancock became the first signatory of the Declaration of Independence by virtue of his election as president of the Continental Congress. And when he served as a delegate to the Federal Convention of 1787, it was his suggestion to entertain amendments to the proposed Constitution that later became the basis for the Bill of Rights.

Hancock lived at the center of late 18th-century Boston politics and commerce, and his life is an engaging prism through which to view Revolutionary New England. Unger, a journalist and a biographer of Noah Webster, effectively uses letters, newspaper articles and first-hand accounts by Hancock and other preeminent Americans to make immediate the events and controversies--the Stamp Act, the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party--that culminated in the Revolutionary War.

He adds a human and remarkably contemporary impression of the rough-and-tumble nature of revolutionary politics through his descriptions of the innuendo and outright attacks directed at Hancock by fellow Bostonian Samuel Adams (though to betterunderstand Adams's enmity, more discussion of the nuances of the men's respective political views would have been useful).

Unger devotes substantial energy to Hancock's private life and habits (Hancock's fondness for almost regal accoutrements was controversial), but his marriage to Dorothy Quincy, as handled by Unger, remains frustratingly enigmatic.

Unger's writing is generally straightforward, rich and satisfying biography that should see only modest success, though it could get a boost from two other fall titles on Revolutionary leaders: H.W. Brands's big bio of Benjamin Franklin and Joseph Ellis's Founding Brothers.

Try this document also.
http://wsu.edu/~dee/AMERICA/REV.HTM

PoliKat
11-12-2008, 01:05 AM
WoW!! I'm glad that question was asked. Now I have a list, too. Especially the Federalist Papers. Now THOSE I have never gone all the way through from start to finish. :rolleyes:

jazztech
11-12-2008, 10:53 AM
I have been reading Liberal Fascism for the last couple months. Almost done. I hadn't been too involved with politics until Gore kept spinning the revolving doors on all the courts in Fla trying to steal the 2000 election. I had always wondered "Well, who's thoughts are correct? Democrats. Republicans? And, why? It seemed like both sides had good points. Now I know why I couldn't decide - all the lies coming from the left. After reading L.F., I can see the entire arc of their ascendence from the French Revolution to today. Trivia: who was the first fascist leader of the 20th century?

linda22003
11-12-2008, 02:48 PM
WoW!! I'm glad that question was asked. Now I have a list, too. Especially the Federalist Papers. Now THOSE I have never gone all the way through from start to finish. :rolleyes:

I do it every few years. I do the same with Moby Dick. Both provide new insights each time. I don't generally do them in the same year.

Molon Labe
11-12-2008, 04:18 PM
I have been reading Liberal Fascism for the last couple months. Almost done. I hadn't been too involved with politics until Gore kept spinning the revolving doors on all the courts in Fla trying to steal the 2000 election. I had always wondered "Well, who's thoughts are correct? Democrats. Republicans? And, why? It seemed like both sides had good points. Now I know why I couldn't decide - all the lies coming from the left. After reading L.F., I can see the entire arc of their ascendence from the French Revolution to today. Trivia: who was the first fascist leader of the 20th century?

I know it's probably too easy to be true....but I'll go with Mussolini as the first. ?