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ReaganForRus
11-21-2008, 06:38 PM
1. The American Revolution began in what year and ended in what year?
2. The major military turning point in the war was what battle?
3. Which American Revolution figure was sentenced to death in the French Revolution?
4. What happened on July 4th, 1826?
5. The first US President born after the American Revolution?
Bonus question

What country furnished the model for their republican government?

Let me know if you want more questions

marinejcksn
11-21-2008, 07:22 PM
1. The American Revolution began in what year and ended in what year?
2. The major military turning point in the war was what battle?
3. Which American Revolution figure was sentenced to death in the French Revolution?
4. What happened on July 4th, 1826?
5. The first US President born after the American Revolution?
Bonus question

What country furnished the model for their republican government?

Let me know if you want more questions

1. 1775-1783. Victory on the Battlefield was achieved in 1781.

2. This is tough. Without cheating and looking it up, I'll go with the Battle of Yorktown. :o

3. I know Thomas Paine was influential in both wars but I don't think he was sentenced to death, was he?)

4. Both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died. ( I know for a fact they both died on the Fourth of July, just can't remember if it was 1826.)

5. Andrew Jackson?

Bonus: I should know this but I'll guess the dutch. :confused:

Constitutionally Speaking
11-21-2008, 08:10 PM
1. The American Revolution began in what year and ended in what year?

1775-1783

2. The major military turning point in the war was what battle?

Saratoga - which convinced the French to join us.

3. Which American Revolution figure was sentenced to death in the French Revolution?

I would guess Lafayette - But that is just a guess

4. What happened on July 4th, 1826?

Both Jefferson and Adams died.


5. The first US President born after the American Revolution?

Van Buren???

Bonus question

What country furnished the model for their republican government?

Rome

Constitutionally Speaking
11-24-2008, 05:53 AM
Bump for answers, more questions or more participants!

Sonnabend
11-24-2008, 08:49 AM
3. Which American Revolution figure was sentenced to death in the French Revolution?

Thomas Paine.

Celtic Rose
11-24-2008, 08:55 AM
1. The American Revolution began in what year and ended in what year?
2. The major military turning point in the war was what battle?
3. Which American Revolution figure was sentenced to death in the French Revolution?
4. What happened on July 4th, 1826?
5. The first US President born after the American Revolution?
Bonus question

What country furnished the model for their republican government?

Let me know if you want more questions

1. 1775-1783
2. Saratoga, I think
3. This, I do not know. Probably one of our French Allies.
4. Thomas Jefferson Died.
5. Andrew Jackson

Bonus: Greece

Sonnabend
11-24-2008, 09:05 AM
1. For what two specific things is Paul Revere remembered?
2. What was the parallel between the Revolutionary War and the battle at Valmy?
3. What notable event occurred at the Battle of Charleston?

linda22003
11-24-2008, 09:16 AM
3. This, I do not know. Probably one of our French Allies.


I think it was the Marquis de Lafayette.

Celtic Rose
11-24-2008, 09:37 AM
I think it was the Marquis de Lafayette.

So, do I get half credit :p

ReaganForRus
11-24-2008, 09:42 AM
Answers

1. 1775-1783
2. Saratoga
3. Tom Paine
4. Both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died
5. John Tyler took office in 1841.

Bonus question

none, There was no existing or historical model, it shows just how brilliant the Fpunding Fathers were.

Next questions,

While Washington is called the "the father of his country", what well known Revolutionary leader staked his claim by having 17 children? Hint: it isn't Ben Franklin

In the first census in 1790, what was the most populous state was?

Which key backer of the Declaration of Independence opposed the Constitution?

What did William Dawes do?

Name the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence

Bonus question

Postwar Revolutionary leaders pursued a policy of silience on what issue lest it destroy the new union?

Sonnabend
11-24-2008, 04:26 PM
Name the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence

None, they're all dead now.:D

ReaganForRus
11-24-2008, 06:10 PM
LOL........no let me re-phrase, Name the signer of the Declaration of If Independence who was last to die.

Lars1701a
11-24-2008, 06:16 PM
Answers

1. 1775-1783
2. Saratoga
3. Tom Paine
4. Both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died
5. John Tyler took office in 1841.

Bonus question

none, There was no existing or historical model, it shows just how brilliant the Fpunding Fathers were.

Next questions,

While Washington is called the "the father of his country", what well known Revolutionary leader staked his claim by having 17 children? Hint: it isn't Ben Franklin

In the first census in 1790, what was the most populous state was?

Which key backer of the Declaration of Independence opposed the Constitution?

What did William Dawes do?

Name the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence

Bonus question

Postwar Revolutionary leaders pursued a policy of silience on what issue lest it destroy the new union?

The answer to your last question is Slavery

THE RESISTANCE
11-24-2008, 09:07 PM
1. The American Revolution began in what year and ended in what year?
2. The major military turning point in the war was what battle?
3. Which American Revolution figure was sentenced to death in the French Revolution?
4. What happened on July 4th, 1826?
5. The first US President born after the American Revolution?
Bonus question

What country furnished the model for their republican government?

Let me know if you want more questions



The battle that turned the tide in the Revolutionary War was none of the earlier great Victorys.

By 1781 these battles importance had waned.

The battles that turned the tide were at Kings Mountain and more importantly at Cowpens.

At Kings mountain 1000 tories under Ferguson were soundly defeated robbing Cornwallis of their help near the end of 1980.
Morgans Victory at Cowpens in January of 1781 robbed Cornwallis again of another thousand. Those are small numbers of men but at the time they were a lot.

If Morgan, Greene had lost a thousand and Cornwallis had kept the thousand he lost, then the Battle at Giulfords Courhouse would have never happen. Cornwallis would have marched into Virginia and together with the traitor Benidict Arnold now commanding British forces there swept Virginia and maybe captured Jefferson. The South would have been completely lost and there would have been no York Town Seige.
Washington would have then been between the British in the North and the British under Cornwallis in the South. Probably to surrender, though he didn't Know that words meaning or retreating into New England.

ReaganForRus
11-24-2008, 09:42 PM
The battle that turned the tide in the Revolutionary War was none of the earlier great Victorys.

By 1781 these battles importance had waned.

The battles that turned the tide were at Kings Mountain and more importantly at Cowpens.

At Kings mountain 1000 tories under Ferguson were soundly defeated robbing Cornwallis of their help near the end of 1980.
Morgans Victory at Cowpens in January of 1781 robbed Cornwallis again of another thousand. Those are small numbers of men but at the time they were a lot.

If Morgan, Greene had lost a thousand and Cornwallis had kept the thousand he lost, then the Battle at Giulfords Courhouse would have never happen. Cornwallis would have marched into Virginia and together with the traitor Benidict Arnold now commanding British forces there swept Virginia and maybe captured Jefferson. The South would have been completely lost and there would have been no York Town Seige.
Washington would have then been between the British in the North and the British under Cornwallis in the South. Probably to surrender, though he didn't Know that words meaning or retreating into New England.
No, nice try..........Maybe the answer for the significance of the Battle of Charleston...but no, the victory at Saratoga was the turning point of the American Revolution for three distinct reasons;

(1.) It destroyed the British plan to divide the northern colonies from the southern colonies and effectively end the War.,

(2.) The loss of the British Army was so acute that it forced Whitehall to accept the ill fated southern strategy that led to Yorktown., and

(3.) Benedict Arnold's victory at Saratoga convinced the French to enter the War on the side of the Americans in order to siphon additional British military forces into the British Colony from the Continent. England was in a world war with France for colonies, so the French wanted to stretch Great Britain both militarily and economically, Remember, the English American colonies were Great Britain's greatest trading colonies contributing the equivalent of 40% to the GDP in trade goods, The East India Company in India by comparison contributed only 23%. Great Britain needed to retain control over her American colonies,

That is why Saratoga is considered the turning point of the American Revolution.

THE RESISTANCE
11-24-2008, 09:44 PM
Answers

1. 1775-1783
2. Saratoga
3. Tom Paine
4. Both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died
5. John Tyler took office in 1841.

Bonus question

none, There was no existing or historical model, it shows just how brilliant the Fpunding Fathers were.

Next questions,

While Washington is called the "the father of his country", what well known Revolutionary leader staked his claim by having 17 children? Hint: it isn't Ben Franklin

In the first census in 1790, what was the most populous state was?

Which key backer of the Declaration of Independence opposed the Constitution?

What did William Dawes do?

Name the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence

Bonus question

Postwar Revolutionary leaders pursued a policy of silience on what issue lest it destroy the new union?

1.?

2. Massachusetts

3. Samuel Adams. Though Patrick Henry though he smelled a rat.

4.Dawes was the other rider that sounded the alarm on that night pf April 19. 1775. While Paul Revere was captured Dawes was able to continue on sounding the alarm.

5. . Charles Carroll was the last Declaration Of Independents signers to die

THE RESISTANCE
11-24-2008, 09:55 PM
No, nice try..........Maybe the answer for the significance of the Battle of Charleston...but no, the victory at Saratoga was the turning point of the American Revolution for three distinct reasons;

(1.) It destroyed the British plan to divide the northern colonies from the southern colonies and effectively end the War.,

(2.) The loss of the British Army was so acute that it forced Whitehall to accept the ill fated southern strategy that led to Yorktown., and

(3.) Benedict Arnold's victory at Saratoga convinced the French to enter the War on the side of the Americans in order to siphon additional British military forces into the British Colony from the Continent. England was in a world war with France for colonies, so the French wanted to stretch Great Britain both militarily and economically, Remember, the English American colonies were Great Britain's greatest trading colonies contributing the equivalent of 40% to the GDP in trade goods, The East India Company in India by comparison contributed only 23%. Great Britain needed to retain control over her American colonies,

That is why Saratoga is considered the turning point of the American Revolution.

Oh I full well Know what the accepted Saratoga was rated but you tell me what would have happened different than my post if the Battle of Cowpens had been lost. The French has always proven that they cannot fight their way out of a wet paper sack on sea and on land even when they have the numbers in their favor. They were happy to stay camped out in New England and ignoring the crys to do something to help Washington . The locals Patriots though they were just stinking up the place from what I have read.
There would have been no York Town again without the action in the South. Wake Washington up and ask him he will tell you.

THE RESISTANCE
11-24-2008, 10:04 PM
The Battle of Charlestown , the loss by Lincoln and 5000 troops captured made the British believe that the South was lost. That the British could now turn direct attention on defeating Washington in the North. But they were far from right. With people like Francis Marion,the Swamp Fox the British could never complete total suppression of the South.

Phillygirl
11-24-2008, 10:09 PM
Great thread!! You're making me want to go read some Revolutionary war history.

noonwitch
11-25-2008, 09:37 AM
Great thread!! You're making me want to go read some Revolutionary war history.


When I was in high school, our American History classes tended to focus on the 20th century, especially WWII. Maybe it was because in the late 70s and 80s, that was a time period most of my teachers had lived through and had a major effect on their generations views and attitudes.

ReaganForRus
11-25-2008, 09:51 AM
Oh I full well Know what the accepted Saratoga was rated but you tell me what would have happened different than my post if the Battle of Cowpens had been lost. The French has always proven that they cannot fight their way out of a wet paper sack on sea and on land even when they have the numbers in their favor. They were happy to stay camped out in New England and ignoring the crys to do something to help Washington . The locals Patriots though they were just stinking up the place from what I have read.
There would have been no York Town again without the action in the South. Wake Washington up and ask him he will tell you.

Again, and I'll use little words, Cowpens is a moot point if the British succeeded in dividing the Northern colonies from the southern colonies as originally designed, The French were never in New England, so you'd have to provide actual documentation as to what French units fought in the Northern theater of operations. Yes, Lafayette was an aide de camp to Washington, but I'm sure you'll agree that it would have taken time for the French to mass forces and resources for an expeditionary force to the Americans. Remember France was fighting England on multiple fronts.

As to the southern campaign, the hit and run tactics of Daniel Morgan and Francis Marion proved far more than effective in handling the British in the swampy, low lying region in South Carolina. Are you not aware that more British soldiers died of yellow fever, malnutrition, and disease in the southern theater than your vaunted Cowpens? Couple that with a major logistics problem that Cornwallis had and the withdrawal to Yorktown to be evacuated by the British fleet, and you have an alignment of events that made the surrender at Yorktown inevitable. Cowpens was an important battle, but again it wasn't the turning point of the War......nice try, see Vanna for your parting gifts.

THE RESISTANCE
11-25-2008, 04:38 PM
Again, and I'll use little words, Cowpens is a moot point if the British succeeded in dividing the Northern colonies from the southern colonies as originally designed, The French were never in New England, so you'd have to provide actual documentation as to what French units fought in the Northern theater of operations. Yes, Lafayette was an aide de camp to Washington, but I'm sure you'll agree that it would have taken time for the French to mass forces and resources for an expeditionary force to the Americans. Remember France was fighting England on multiple fronts.

As to the southern campaign, the hit and run tactics of Daniel Morgan and Francis Marion proved far more than effective in handling the British in the swampy, low lying region in South Carolina. Are you not aware that more British soldiers died of yellow fever, malnutrition, and disease in the southern theater than your vaunted Cowpens? Couple that with a major logistics problem that Cornwallis had and the withdrawal to Yorktown to be evacuated by the British fleet, and you have an alignment of events that made the surrender at Yorktown inevitable. Cowpens was an important battle, but again it wasn't the turning point of the War......nice try, see Vanna for your parting gifts.


Maybe you should look up where Newport, Rhode Island and Rochambeau fit together. He broke camp with his Army there and joined Washington in the march through Pennsylvania to Chesapeake Bay. The French fleet under DeGrasse arrived with an additional 3000 French troops and ferried the combined armys of Washington and Rochambeau to Williamsburg, Virginia. Then they march nine miles to York Town to to set up their seige.

biccat
11-25-2008, 05:40 PM
At Kings mountain 1000 tories under Ferguson were soundly defeated robbing Cornwallis of their help near the end of 1980.
Yikes!

Was that before, after, or during the Iran hostage crisis?

ReaganForRus
11-25-2008, 06:23 PM
Maybe you should look up where Newport, Rhode Island and Rochambeau fit together. He broke camp with his Army there and joined Washington in the march through Pennsylvania to Chesapeake Bay. The French fleet under DeGrasse arrived with an additional 3000 French troops and ferried the combined armys of Washington and Rochambeau to Williamsburg, Virginia. Then they march nine miles to York Town to to set up their seige.

Thank you, you made my point for me............Now, name the battles before your vaunted Cowpens that the French fought in? The point is, the French did not enter the War until after the turning point of the War at Saratoga. Yes, French units arrived and trained in the colonies, but you have yet to quantify how the mighty battle of Cowpens supersedes Saratoga as the turning point of the American Revolution. Remember, without Saratoga there can be no Charleston, no Cowpens, no Guilford Courthouse and more importantly, no Yorktown.

ReaganForRus
11-25-2008, 06:24 PM
Yikes!

Was that before, after, or during the Iran hostage crisis?

LOL....sshhhhh you'll offend our friends googling skills.:D

Constitutionally Speaking
11-25-2008, 07:15 PM
1. For what two specific things is Paul Revere remembered?

He was an exceptional silversmith and of course his ride warning of the British invasion.

2. What was the parallel between the Revolutionary War and the battle at Valmy?

Tactical defeat/stalemate but overall victory???

3. What notable event occurred at the Battle of Charleston?

The scuttling of the naval fleet at the mouth of the harbor??

THE RESISTANCE
11-25-2008, 08:35 PM
Thank you, you made my point for me............Now, name the battles before your vaunted Cowpens that the French fought in? The point is, the French did not enter the War until after the turning point of the War at Saratoga. Yes, French units arrived and trained in the colonies, but you have yet to quantify how the mighty battle of Cowpens supersedes Saratoga as the turning point of the American Revolution. Remember, without Saratoga there can be no Charleston, no Cowpens, no Guilford Courthouse and more importantly, no Yorktown.

Maybe you should reread your post about the the French never being in New England . Rhode Island is a part of New England and the French had to cross Connecticut to march with Washington. They had been there more than a year arriving in July of 1780. No one made any point for you at all Reagan, except in your own mind maybe.

The French General would not help Washington in his plan to attack New York but was all for Yorktown for some reason.

The turning point in the Revolution would be the battle that let to the end of the Revolutionary War. The battle at Saratoga only prolonged the fighting allowing the Revolution to continue no matter what benifits came to the United States . After all it had been fought in October of 1777.

While Yorktown which lead the King of England to realize that the colonies had won and Lord North to Exclaim "Oh God, it"s all over." was fought in 1881. The trail to it being all over, leads through Kings Mountain, Cowpens, Guilford Courthouse, Wilmington encampment then to Yorktown. Of the three of these that where battles before Yorktown then Cowpens would have to be considered the turning point that ended the War.

THE RESISTANCE
11-25-2008, 08:41 PM
Yikes!

Was that before, after, or during the Iran hostage crisis?


I think it was just a bit before the Iran hostage crisis, just a bit. LOL

THE RESISTANCE
11-25-2008, 09:02 PM
I am not sure of the notable event you are thinking of at Charles Town but General Lincoln was treated badly by the British General Clinton. Instead of allowing his surrender to be the typical one of the day for the troops to march out with colors flying playing a tune in the band of the victors choice, colors were bound and no tune was given to them for that "ceremony."

Lincoln was later exchanged and was at Yorktown and when the British surrendered there Washington made them do the exact same that is why the British band played " The World Turned Upside Down " as they marched out and piled their muskets rudely in a pile and marched back. Washington also told the subordinate that surrendered Cornwallis' Sword give it to Lincoln. Both instances Charles Town and York Town were considered an insult to the different vanquished.

Cornwallis pretended illness and didn't come out to surrender with his troops. He also protested saying he had nothing to do with Lincolns treatment at Charles Town.

ReaganForRus
11-26-2008, 07:37 AM
Maybe you should reread your post about the the French never being in New England . Rhode Island is a part of New England and the French had to cross Connecticut to march with Washington. They had been there more than a year arriving in July of 1780. No one made any point for you at all Reagan, except in your own mind maybe.

The French General would not help Washington in his plan to attack New York but was all for Yorktown for some reason.

The turning point in the Revolution would be the battle that let to the end of the Revolutionary War. The battle at Saratoga only prolonged the fighting allowing the Revolution to continue no matter what benifits came to the United States . After all it had been fought in October of 1777.

While Yorktown which lead the King of England to realize that the colonies had won and Lord North to Exclaim "Oh God, it"s all over." was fought in 1881. The trail to it being all over, leads through Kings Mountain, Cowpens, Guilford Courthouse, Wilmington encampment then to Yorktown. Of the three of these that where battles before Yorktown then Cowpens would have to be considered the turning point that ended the War.

Again, you evade the most important point, Saratoga led directly to France recognizing the Americans as an independent country, France was one of two world powers at the time (England being the other) and without the financial and military resources France provided, it would have been highly unlikely of the Colonies ever attaining independence.

Saratoga forced Whitehall to the ill fated Southern campaign. The battles you mentioned were important to the American Revolution no doubt, However, Saratoga was the turning point of the American Revolution, not not your vaunted Cowpens. Without the Saratoga victory, it is highly doubtful that the British would have even gone South since they would have effectively split the colonies in two, controlled the major cities, and would have used the navy to blockade the remaining ports.

THE RESISTANCE
11-26-2008, 11:02 AM
Again, you evade the most important point, Saratoga led directly to France recognizing the Americans as an independent country, France was one of two world powers at the time (England being the other) and without the financial and military resources France provided, it would have been highly unlikely of the Colonies ever attaining independence.

Saratoga forced Whitehall to the ill fated Southern campaign. The battles you mentioned were important to the American Revolution no doubt, However, Saratoga was the turning point of the American Revolution, not not your vaunted Cowpens. Without the Saratoga victory, it is highly doubtful that the British would have even gone South since they would have effectively split the colonies in two, controlled the major cities, and would have used the navy to blockade the remaining ports.


Well then you tell me, subtracting all these string of American Victorys I mentioned and that would have to include York Town for it would have never happened.

What is the likelihood that any battle won four years before, as Saratoga would have been anything more than a footnote in How the British Empire put down the Rebellion in the Colonies?

The turning point is the point that a tide turns that those winning begin to lose and lose quickly. It is like four Touchdowns( these four battles) just after ten minutes left to go in the four quarter when trailing 30 to 3.