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crusty
05-29-2008, 05:54 PM
Chardon Students refuse to trade dress blues for robes

(Chardon) - A high school east of Cleveland is saying “no” to two teens who want to wear their military uniforms on stage at their high school graduation.

Will McDonnell, an active duty marine, and Tony Workman, an Army National Guardsman, are graduating from Chardon High School in Geauga County.

McDonnell took extra classes and met his graduation requirements last fall so he could attend a 13-week Marine Boot Camp in February. Workman went through the Army's 10-week basic training last summer.

Link (http://www.wtam.com/cc-common/news/sections/newsarticle.html?feed=122520&article=3749994)

CLibertarian
05-29-2008, 06:31 PM
Chardon Students refuse to trade dress blues for robes

(Chardon) - A high school east of Cleveland is saying “no” to two teens who want to wear their military uniforms on stage at their high school graduation.

Will McDonnell, an active duty marine, and Tony Workman, an Army National Guardsman, are graduating from Chardon High School in Geauga County.

McDonnell took extra classes and met his graduation requirements last fall so he could attend a 13-week Marine Boot Camp in February. Workman went through the Army's 10-week basic training last summer.

Link (http://www.wtam.com/cc-common/news/sections/newsarticle.html?feed=122520&article=3749994)

I dare them to show up in uniform anyway with some Conservative press.

noonwitch
06-02-2008, 11:27 AM
I've never been in the military, but my dad was in the Army. I was told that if one is a member of the service, on leave to attend a formal ceremony of any sort, that he or she was required to wear the dress uniform for that occasion-like the way those in the service wear the uniform when they appear on game shows (which is why we asked dad about it to begin with).

Why would the school have a problem with this? Shouldn't they be proud that some of their grads are already pursuing their career goals?

enslaved1
06-03-2008, 11:09 AM
Why would the school have a problem with this? Shouldn't they be proud that some of their grads are already pursuing their career goals?

No because it may damage the self-esteem of all the students who have no clue as to what they will do with the rest of their lives and haven't been taught the skills to find out by the school they are graduating from.

Rules against costumes and decorations on gowns and caps are common and common sense. But these guys are wanting to wear their recognized, worthy of respect, and hard earned official uniforms. They deserve that honor. The school needs to shove it.

Odysseus
06-04-2008, 02:31 PM
No because it may damage the self-esteem of all the students who have no clue as to what they will do with the rest of their lives and haven't been taught the skills to find out by the school they are graduating from.
Rules against costumes and decorations on gowns and caps are common and common sense. But these guys are wanting to wear their recognized, worthy of respect, and hard earned official uniforms. They deserve that honor. The school needs to shove it.

If the rule is that everyone wears the same robe, that's the rule. If other students were allowed to personalize their outfits, they'd have a case. On the other hand, there is no rule about what you have to wear under the robe, and I see no reason why they can't wear their uniforms. Once the ceremony is over, the robes come off, anyway.

enslaved1
06-05-2008, 10:59 AM
If the rule is that everyone wears the same robe, that's the rule. If other students were allowed to personalize their outfits, they'd have a case. On the other hand, there is no rule about what you have to wear under the robe, and I see no reason why they can't wear their uniforms. Once the ceremony is over, the robes come off, anyway.

By the rules you are correct. I'm arguing the stupidity of the rule in it's application to this particular case. The school should have the common sense and respect to say "you guys busted your butts, you gained a position of respect, and we give you the right to display that position in a dignified manner i.e. wearing dress uniforms at during the graduation."

And my high school said no shorts on graduation day, because it looks like you ain't got nothing on underneath your robe.

biccat
06-05-2008, 11:08 AM
And my high school said no shorts on graduation day, because it looks like you ain't got nothing on underneath your robe.
My wife graduated with a guy who cut the bottoms off of a pair of pants and sewed them into his robe so that it looked like he was wearing something underneath.

LibraryLady
06-05-2008, 11:08 AM
If the rule is that everyone wears the same robe, that's the rule. If other students were allowed to personalize their outfits, they'd have a case. On the other hand, there is no rule about what you have to wear under the robe, and I see no reason why they can't wear their uniforms. Once the ceremony is over, the robes come off, anyway.

My daughter just graduated and they had very stringent rules about what was worn under the gowns. Girls had to wear a white dress, boys black slacks, white shirt and dark tie.

This is a very conservative town - we had a class prayer and a benediction but I have no idea what would happen if someone had requested to wear a uniform.

newshutr
06-05-2008, 11:19 AM
I live six miles south of Chardon. The boys decided to appear in the honor guard, go to commencement with their classmates in Uniform but not walk across the stage.

I applaud them for their stance.

enslaved1
06-05-2008, 02:05 PM
My wife graduated with a guy who cut the bottoms off of a pair of pants and sewed them into his robe so that it looked like he was wearing something underneath.

One of my friends did that, but he didn't sew them on to the robe. May in Kansas is too bloody hot to sit there in a black robe, outside, all zooted up underneath the robe.

LibraryLady
06-05-2008, 04:16 PM
This was a high school but the American Council of Education has a Rule Book:

An Academic Costume Code and An Academic Ceremony Guide: (http://www.acenet.edu/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Search&template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=10625#Exceptions)
Some Permissible Exceptions

Only members of the governing body of a college or university, whatever their degrees, are entitled to wear doctor's gowns (with black velvet), but their hoods may be only those of degrees actually held by the wearers or those especially prescribed for them by the institution.
The chief marshal may wear a specially designed costume approved by the institution.
It is customary in many large institutions for the hood to be dispensed with by those receiving bachelor's degrees.
Persons who hold degrees from foreign universities may wear the entire appropriate academic costume, including cap, gown, and hood.
Members of religious orders may suitably wear their customary habits. The same principle applies to persons wearing military uniforms or clad in special attire required by a civil office.
It is recommended that collegiate institutions that award degrees, diplomas, or certificates below the baccalaureate level use caps and gowns of a light color, e.g., light gray.

Odysseus
06-05-2008, 09:28 PM
By the rules you are correct. I'm arguing the stupidity of the rule in it's application to this particular case. The school should have the common sense and respect to say "you guys busted your butts, you gained a position of respect, and we give you the right to display that position in a dignified manner i.e. wearing dress uniforms at during the graduation."
And my high school said no shorts on graduation day, because it looks like you ain't got nothing on underneath your robe.

I assume that you've seen the Porky's movies. :D

Normally, I'm extremely sensitive to the issue of disrespect to the uniform, but in this case, I don't see it. The issue is uniformity and the school was enforcing a common uniform standard, a cap and gown for crossing the stage. The school also offered to let them lead the honor guard in uniform, which tells me that they weren't discriminating against military personnel or showing disrespect for the uniform. Unfortunately, if the school had given in, the following year, some moonbat would have sued for the right to wear a Code Pink outfit. It's the times that we live in, unfortunately.

enslaved1
06-06-2008, 10:29 AM
I assume that you've seen the Porky's movies. :D

Normally, I'm extremely sensitive to the issue of disrespect to the uniform, but in this case, I don't see it. The issue is uniformity and the school was enforcing a common uniform standard, a cap and gown for crossing the stage. The school also offered to let them lead the honor guard in uniform, which tells me that they weren't discriminating against military personnel or showing disrespect for the uniform. Unfortunately, if the school had given in, the following year, some moonbat would have sued for the right to wear a Code Pink outfit. It's the times that we live in, unfortunately.

That possibility did cross my mind. I do think that it would be very easy to allow the service men their uniforms this year, and make it a priority in the next school board meeting to lay down a very, very strict definition of what uniforms may be worn at graduation. Odds are the school will get sued for something, they may as well pick what it will be and stand up for something right.

And no, I never have actually sat down and watched Porky's. I've seen bits and pieces, but never the whole thing at once. And I think I can live with that. :)