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Puro Fan
11-30-2008, 06:11 PM
Born to Run? Little Ones Get Test for Sports Gene
By JULIET MACUR
Published: November 29, 2008

BOULDER, Colo. — When Donna Campiglia learned recently that a genetic test might be able to determine which sports suit the talents of her 2 ½-year-old son, Noah, she instantly said, Where can I get it and how much does it cost?

“I could see how some people might think the test would pigeonhole your child into doing fewer sports or being exposed to fewer things, but I still think it’s good to match them with the right activity,” Ms. Campiglia, 36, said as she watched a toddler class at Boulder Indoor Soccer in which Noah struggled to take direction from the coach between juice and potty breaks.

“I think it would prevent a lot of parental frustration,” she said.

It isn't about parental frustration. It's about the kids. Who cares if the kid sucks at a particular sport; as long as they are having fun.

One of my neighbors is an overbearing ass when it comes to youth sports. As he puts it, "my son(age 11) is going to be in the NFL someday." He has fought(not psychically) with coaches and staff in three different youth football leagues. Not surprisingly, he has been asked not to register his son for any of those leagues again. According to him, "They're all too stupid see my sons talent."

I swear it is the amount of money that professional athletes make that has driven parents to act this way. These parents see their kids involvement in youth sports as a potential meal ticket.



http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/30/sports/30genetics.html?pagewanted=1&no_interstitial

Bubba Dawg
11-30-2008, 06:15 PM
If you've ever been a coach or an assistant on a youth sports team, you know that you have more problems (usually) with the parents that you do the kids.

It can really take the fun out of it.

Bubba Dawg
11-30-2008, 06:16 PM
And it's good to see ya, man. :)

Jumpy
11-30-2008, 07:03 PM
When I read about that, I gathered that it will tell you if your kid will be better at endurance type sports, or strength sports. Pretty much a rich person fad, and no brainer. It leaves no room for the "heart" of the athlete, and the desire.

When my son was 2 years old, and low in weight, yet still off the charts in height, and taller than everybody else in elementary school, and jumped out of the gym, it was obvious to everybody that he would play a sport that required him to jump high. No special testing needed to tell us that he was not going to be a star wrestler.

It is a lame test, and as I understand it, it will not tell mommy if the kid could excel in soccer vs hockey.

Space Gravy
11-30-2008, 07:20 PM
If you've ever been a coach or an assistant on a youth sports team, you know that you have more problems (usually) with the parents that you do the kids.

It can really take the fun out of it.

No shit. I did it when I was 16 years old. It was an absolute nightmare.

Puro Fan
11-30-2008, 07:30 PM
If you've ever been a coach or an assistant on a youth sports team, you know that you have more problems (usually) with the parents that you do the kids.

It can really take the fun out of it.

I helped a different neighbor coach his 8yo sons baseball team. He had a few lefties on the team and thought, since I'm a lefty and played baseball in high school, I could help them with a few things. After the fourth or fifth practice, before we even played a game, I told him I would finish the season but wouldn't comeback the following season. The parents were total dicks.:mad:

Bubba Dawg
11-30-2008, 09:48 PM
I helped a different neighbor coach his 8yo sons baseball team. He had a few lefties on the team and thought, since I'm a lefty and played baseball in high school, I could help them with a few things. After the fourth or fifth practice, before we even played a game, I told him I would finish the season but wouldn't comeback the following season. The parents were total dicks.:mad:


Yep. Been there and done that. Sad, really. (I mean for the kids.)

Phillygirl
11-30-2008, 09:55 PM
2 years ago while watching my nephew play baseball I was absolutely mortified at how the parents on his team acted. They kept yelling every time a kid threw a bat after hitting. I get the safety issue there. But it was more than that. They viewed it as a way to get the best kids on the other team benched. They looked in horror at me when I cheered a run made by the other team, or clapped on a good play.

They were 10 years old! There is no need for that kind of behavior from the adults. And the poor sportsmanship that they were teaching their kids was abominable.

BigTone
11-30-2008, 10:06 PM
I see the problems with youth sports. I believe that youth sports are meant to be for fun and recreation, not for competition. When I played Little League, the games were fun. Sure, the team wants to win, but I was learning the game. To me, it is all about having fun. No coaches should yelll at their players for committing errors or costing the game. I realize that in high school sports, the competition was stiffer and tougher. This is when the players learn to stop fooling around and get bet into business. It is when discipline, responsibilty, and perseverence takes more importance. And high school sports created my character and become a hard worker.

noonwitch
12-01-2008, 11:20 AM
My dad was a really good Little League coach back in the day, mostly because he could deal with obnoxious parents. He played every kid on the team, and more than the required 2 innnings. He believed that the team doesn't really win if all the kids didn't play.

He would tell the parents who objected that all the kids paid the same amount to play, so all the kids get to play. Even the kid who had crooked legs.

Gingersnap
12-01-2008, 12:02 PM
Removing parents from the equation would be a step in the right direction. Amazingly, there was a time when parents seldom bothered to show up for any youth sporting activity that didn't involve a tournament or a playoff. They didn't show up for every game and practice, scrutinize the players in terms of tactics, or debate the coaches. Parents who did do that sort of thing were considered nuts, not "involved".

Children themselves were not thrilled when their parents did hang around for practice. Bad enough to screw up in front your team and your coach, adding Dad to the mix just caused more anxiety.

All those kids coming up under that system of benign parental neglect (in sports terms) had perfectly normal experiences in sports and almost none of them got sports scholarships or became professional athletes.

Just exactly like right now except we don't have the "normal" part.