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EricMartin
12-10-2008, 05:48 AM
This is an interesting and thought-provoking dramatization of John Galt's Speech, from Atlas Shrugged. The first part is an interlude, while the speech itself starts after a couple of minutes. Both Democrats and Republicans will be challenged.

I advise you to watch in in full screen.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luKo_w-EVmU

Arroyo_Doble
12-10-2008, 09:16 AM
Reading the speech was torture enough.

What a blowhard.

Constitutionally Speaking
12-10-2008, 10:16 AM
Although I believe that Rand has much relevance to today's issues, I also believe she grossly misunderstands Christianity and therefore, misrepresents it in her writings.

wilbur
12-10-2008, 10:37 AM
Good stuff... I really should read that book.

FlaGator
12-10-2008, 03:13 PM
Good stuff... I really should read that book.

You aren't missing all that much.

EricMartin
12-10-2008, 04:36 PM
Good stuff... I really should read that book.

You really should. It's become a tradition for me to read it (or listen through the audiobook by the wonderful narrator Christian Hurt) every Christmas – it's a life-changer. Here's a great lecture from the 50th anniversary of Atlas Shrugged, where the millionaire Ed Snider (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Snider) speaks about his first meeting with Rand, and of how Atlas influenced his life. It starts at 01:05.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jb88qt1XTsI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7R3BDgLqhE

EricMartin
12-13-2008, 09:05 AM
I found a passage from the Bible, which illustrates the point made in Galt's Speech.


The First Letter of John, ch. 2: 15 - 17
"Love not the world, neither the things that are in the world. If any man love the world, the love of the Father is not in him. For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world. And the world passeth away, and the lust thereof: but he that doeth the will of God abideth for ever."

St. Augustine pointed out, over 1500 years ago, that "the lust of the eyes" does not refer to sexual desire, which is already condemned in the previous phrase, ("the lust of the flesh"), but to something worse: intellectual curiosity about reality for its own sake. Here's his commentary from his Confessions 10.35.54 (transl. from Catholic Encyclopedia website):


"In addition to this there is another form of temptation, more complex in its peril. For besides that concupiscence of the flesh . . . there pertains to the soul, through the same senses of the body, a certain vain and curious longing, cloaked under the name of knowledge and learning, not of having pleasure in the flesh, but of making experiments through the flesh. This longing, since it originates in an appetite for knowledge, and the sight being the chief amongst the senses in the acquisition of knowledge, is called in divine language, " the lust of the eyes." (1 John 2:16) For seeing belongs properly to the eyes; yet we apply this word to the other senses also, when we exercise them in the search after knowledge. . . . "

I find this celebration of ignorance, and condemnation of the intellect, both suppressive and anti-life.

wilbur
12-13-2008, 11:58 AM
I found a passage from the Bible, which illustrates the point made in Galt's Speech.

St. Augustine pointed out, over 1500 years ago, that "the lust of the eyes" does not refer to sexual desire, which is already condemned in the previous phrase, ("the lust of the flesh"), but to something worse: intellectual curiosity about reality for its own sake. Here's his commentary from his Confessions 10.35.54 (transl. from Catholic Encyclopedia website):

I find this celebration of ignorance, and condemnation of the intellect, both suppressive and anti-life.

Great find!