PDA

View Full Version : New California Law to Monitor every Toilet flush and Shower



Elspeth
06-05-2018, 10:59 AM
Every flush will be monitored, while tons of fresh water is pumped out to sea because of the Delta Smelt.

New California Law Limits How Much Water People Can Use – Including Monitoring Toilet Flushes, Showers
https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2018/06/new-california-law-limits-how-much-water-people-can-use-including-monitoring-toilet-flushes-showers/


California Governor Jerry Brown signed a new law that would severely restrict the amount of water people can use inside of their homes.

The government of California will now be monitoring people’s toilet flushes, showers and laundry use.

Under the new water use limits, each person will barely have enough ‘daily water allowance’ to do one load of laundry and take an 8 minute shower.

This also covers outdoor use so no watering your lawns or gardens, peasants.

CBS Sacramento reported:


...California is now the first state in the nation to enact tough new water-efficiency standards. The controversial rules limit how many gallons a person can use inside their home per day.

“So that everyone in California is at least integrating efficiency into our preparations for climate change,” said Felicia Marcus, Chair of the State Water Resources Control Board.

So, what are the new rules?

In 2022, the new indoor water standard will be 55 gallons per person, per day. by 2030, it will fall to 50 gallons.

Just how many gallons do household chores take?

An 8-minute shower uses about 17 gallons of water, a load of laundry up to 40, and a bathtub can hold 80 to 100 gallons of water.

...Water districts who don’t comply face fines up to $10,000 a day.

The ultimate goal is to make conservation a way of life in California. Outdoor water use is also covered by the new laws.

Rockntractor
06-05-2018, 11:09 AM
San Francisco has found a way around this.

https://theminorityreportblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/illegal_pooping.jpg

FlaGator
06-05-2018, 11:42 AM
California seems to be on the cutting edge of the creation of a total dystopian society.

Elspeth
06-05-2018, 11:44 AM
California seems to be on the cutting edge of the creation of a total dystopian society.

I have GOT to get out of here.

I do have plans to be out by next summer. Cross your fingers.

Angry Old White Man
06-05-2018, 12:22 PM
Good news, that silly governor is passed the age he has a lot of time left on this planet, one day we'll all wake up and see he died of disease associated to non bathing and poor hygiene. Maybe they will keep the lid closed on him when they pack him off to his next job. Of course we all know he does use all the water he likes, and his politburo surrounding him. This could be a great thing for California and really make people mad enough to put this guy where he belongs. They're all morons in the democratic party in California, I seriously doubt many of them take bathes :biggrin-new:

Elspeth
06-05-2018, 12:30 PM
Good news, that silly governor is passed the age he has a lot of time left on this planet, one day we'll all wake up and see he died of disease associated to non bathing and poor hygiene. Maybe they will keep the lid closed on him when they pack him off to his next job. Of course we all know he does use all the water he likes, and his politburo surrounding him. This could be a great thing for California and really make people mad enough to put this guy where he belongs. They're all morons in the democratic party in California, I seriously doubt many of them take bathes :biggrin-new:

You KNOW these laws won't apply to Democrat politicians!

FlaGator
06-05-2018, 01:00 PM
I have GOT to get out of here.

I do have plans to be out by next summer. Cross your fingers.

Give Florida a try. It's like California just hotter, more conservative and we have hurricanes instead of earthquakes.

Elspeth
06-05-2018, 01:02 PM
Give Florida a try. It's like California just hotter, more conservative and we have hurricanes instead of earthquakes.

Good thought. At the moment, I'm looking at Virginia. I have friends there. Will need to get work though.

Retread
06-05-2018, 03:14 PM
Good thought. At the moment, I'm looking at Virginia. I have friends there. Will need to get work though.

I keep telling ya, come to Texas. You can try Austin to begin with. It’s a lib city surrounding a conservative government but that do tolerate well. You would fit right in with the Austin motto “Keep Austin weird”.

Elspeth
06-05-2018, 03:18 PM
I keep telling ya, come to Texas. You can try Austin to begin with. It’s a lib city surrounding a conservative government but that do tolerate well. You would fit right in with the Austin motto “Keep Austin weird”.

I don't know about Austin, although it's supposed to be artsy. I don't have friends there, though. I do have friends in VA and in NJ. I do not have any interest in going to NJ, and I feel like VA is being destroyed by the Clinton scum running it right now. However, southern VA looks good.

It's really about getting work.

Retread
06-05-2018, 03:21 PM
I don't know about Austin, although it's supposed to be artsy. I don't have friends there, though. I do have friends in VA and in NJ. I do not have any interest in going to NJ, and I feel like VA is being destroyed by the Clinton scum running it right now. However, southern VA looks good.

It's really about getting work.

Southern is definitely better than northern unless you’re at Front Royal with the mountains 3 blocks away. I’d say anywhere in the western portion would be the best of all the state.

Elspeth
06-05-2018, 04:22 PM
Southern is definitely better than northern unless you’re at Port Royal with the mountains 3 blocks away. I’d say anywhere in the western portion would be the best of all the state.

Like Charlottesville? (I'm trying to avoid university towns because they tend to be very liberal.)

Retread
06-05-2018, 04:55 PM
I’d say Front Royal or Roanoke would be my first two choices. But I do love the mountains. Roanoke does have three schools but with a total enrollment of about 10k. Front Royal has one with an enrollment of about 500.

You could do Newport News, Chesapeake or Norfolk if you want near the Atlantic coast. That also gets you neighbors with the Great Dismal Swamp Wildlife Refuge.

Lynchburg seems to be a nice little place but has at least a half dozen colleges, teaching hospitals and the like.

Of course the entire state is a historical treasure trove.

Elspeth
06-05-2018, 05:24 PM
I’d say Front Royal or Roanoke would be my first two choices. But I do love the mountains. Roanoke does have three schools but with a total enrollment of about 10k. Front Royal has one with an enrollment of about 500.

You could do Newport News, Chesapeake or Norfolk if you want near the Atlantic coast. That also gets you neighbors with the Great Dismal Swamp Wildlife Refuge.

Lynchburg seems to be a nice little place but has at least a half dozen colleges, teaching hospitals and the like.

Of course the entire state is a historical treasure trove.

I'm going to bookmark this post. I don't know the Atlantic coast well. It's nice to have a little guidance.

noonwitch
06-06-2018, 09:30 AM
Good thought. At the moment, I'm looking at Virginia. I have friends there. Will need to get work though.

VA is nice, you have ocean and mountains in driving distance.

I would suggest MI-not Detroit, too liberal for you, but West Michigan, where I grew up. Grand Rapids is a nice city, although its more liberal than when I was a kid. Holland and the GR suburbs are pretty conservative. There are lots of thriving businesses in the area and the beach is 30 miles away from GR. The medical field is a growing one in the area, and in MI in general. This time of year, it's wonderful. The landscape of the area is nice, as there is a river and lots of creeks that feed it, although some areas are prone to spring flooding. GR is the home of Christian Publishing-Baker, Zondervan, Eerdman all have their headquarters there. There are also a lot of local businesses and restaurants, national chains don't do well in the core city and are mostly in the suburbs. GR has a symphony, an opera company, good schools both in city and burbs, and the area is fairly inexpensive compared to SE MI as far as housing, food, etc. are concerned. No hurricanes, and only occasional quakes of 3.5 or less, centered around the fracking in Kalamazoo, which is also a nice area. If your kid graduates from K-zoo public schools, he or she gets free tuition at WMU or KVCC.


But there is winter.

Old n Grumpy
06-06-2018, 12:28 PM
New homes will be required to have these new water saving toilets:

https://www.bing.com/th?id=OIP.Ln27jx1Qs4hubVVIG45bcQHaJc&w=196&h=250&c=7&o=5&pid=1.7

Dlr Pyro
06-06-2018, 12:38 PM
New homes will be required to have these new water saving toilets:

https://www.bing.com/th?id=OIP.Ln27jx1Qs4hubVVIG45bcQHaJc&w=196&h=250&c=7&o=5&pid=1.7Yeah, that's progress, I guess....

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

FlaGator
06-06-2018, 01:09 PM
Good thought. At the moment, I'm looking at Virginia. I have friends there. Will need to get work though.

Like Texas, we have no state income tax

Retread
06-06-2018, 02:34 PM
Like Texas, we have no state income tax

So how come my daughter in Arlington has to file every year?

Elspeth
06-06-2018, 03:16 PM
VA is nice, you have ocean and mountains in driving distance.

I would suggest MI-not Detroit, too liberal for you, but West Michigan, where I grew up. Grand Rapids is a nice city, although its more liberal than when I was a kid. Holland and the GR suburbs are pretty conservative. There are lots of thriving businesses in the area and the beach is 30 miles away from GR. The medical field is a growing one in the area, and in MI in general. This time of year, it's wonderful. The landscape of the area is nice, as there is a river and lots of creeks that feed it, although some areas are prone to spring flooding. GR is the home of Christian Publishing-Baker, Zondervan, Eerdman all have their headquarters there. There are also a lot of local businesses and restaurants, national chains don't do well in the core city and are mostly in the suburbs. GR has a symphony, an opera company, good schools both in city and burbs, and the area is fairly inexpensive compared to SE MI as far as housing, food, etc. are concerned. No hurricanes, and only occasional quakes of 3.5 or less, centered around the fracking in Kalamazoo, which is also a nice area. If your kid graduates from K-zoo public schools, he or she gets free tuition at WMU or KVCC.


But there is winter.

I'll bookmark this as well. But, as you said, there is winter. That's the downside of moving from the West coast. Retread's suggestion of Texas sounds good for that reason and it's why I've tried to stay in a temperate southern climate.

Elspeth
06-06-2018, 03:17 PM
Like Texas, we have no state income tax

Forgot about that. We are about to have our state income tax skyrocket with Gavin Newsom,

Elspeth
06-06-2018, 03:18 PM
New homes will be required to have these new water saving toilets:

https://www.bing.com/th?id=OIP.Ln27jx1Qs4hubVVIG45bcQHaJc&w=196&h=250&c=7&o=5&pid=1.7

An environmentalist's dream. :apologetic:

Elspeth
06-07-2018, 04:05 PM
Tammy Bruce has a great article on this. She points out who is the BIGGEST water waster (and it ain't the people):

Tammy Bruce: Will California's new water rules push people out of the Golden State?
http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2018/06/07/tammy-bruce-californias-new-water-rules-are-making-people-flee-golden-state.html


....To give you perspective on how much water basic chores require, the station noted an eight-minute shower uses about 17 gallons of water, a load of laundry up to 40, and a bathtub can hold 80 to 100 gallons of water.

Felicia Marcus, chair of the State Water Resources Control Board, explained this is happening, “So that everyone in California is at least integrating efficiency into our preparations for climate change.” That’s nice. This same bureaucrat then noted to CBS-13, “Right now we lose up to 30 percent of urban water just to leaks in the system.”

As the state rations the water of the average of family, making it impossible for everyone to shower and wash clothes, let alone use water to wash the dishes, and perform any myriad of other efforts to keep a home clean and a family healthy, it’s the state itself and its crumbling infrastructure that is the biggest waster of water.

In 2014, during the drought, Californians found out what happens when policy focuses on controlling people, which is much easier than actually governing and maintaining infrastructure.

The Pasadena Star-News reported, “As 20 million gallons of drinking water rushed down Sunset Boulevard and flooded the UCLA campus this summer, drought-conscious residents threw up their hands. How are three-minute showers going to make a difference, they asked, when the city’s pipes are bursting? Turns out the UCLA flood was just a drop in the sea of potable water that leaks or blows out of underground pipes. California’s water distribution systems lose up to 228 billion gallons a year, the state Department of Water Resources estimates — more than enough to supply the entire city of Los Angeles for a year.”

The wasted water isn’t relegated to local areas in Southern California. The San Jose Mercury News reported about the Bay Area at the time, “Aging and broken pipes, usually underground and out of sight, have leaked enough water annually to submerge the whole of Manhattan by 5 feet — enough to meet the needs of 71,000 families for an entire year.”...